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Old 09-29-2009, 01:29 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,847 posts, read 30,369,034 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dave nz View Post
At the age of 31 would you? If not why not? and if so what would you get upto with your free time?
in a heartbeat.

Nothing would make me happier than being a stay at home wife 24/7 and be able to pursue my INTERESTS which, sadly, does not involve making a living. I do that only because I have to.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 09-29-2009, 01:52 PM
 
71,637 posts, read 71,777,271 times
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I only want to work to fill the time between weekends
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Old 09-29-2009, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,371 posts, read 9,866,638 times
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For me, there's a big difference between retiring from 'work' and retiring from 'right livelihood.'

If I hated my job I'd be happy to have quit of it. But if I loved my livelihood, if it were my passion, then I couldn't imagine retiring from it--why would I want to?

For me, it's important that I also feel I'm making a contribution to society, so I divide my time between my livelihood--which I love--and community work, which I also love.

Lolling about in a beach chair or too much skiing would get very old, very quickly. I need to feed my mind and my spirit by doing endeavors that feed both...then I really appreciate both the beach chair and skiing.

It's about balance, isn't it??
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Old 09-29-2009, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Finally escaped The People's Republic of California
11,119 posts, read 7,570,795 times
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At 31, I'd have to have something to ocupy alot of my time. I'd want to be busy doing something.
I'm 49 now and have pulled out of the fast lane, but not out of the race
At 55 I'll be ready to retire....
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Old 09-29-2009, 08:15 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,550,538 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tesaje View Post
...Living with no job does not need to be a lot more expensive. You have more time to pursue things that could be expensive but also more time to do things from scratch that would save a lot of money...
These are Words of Wisdom. That is exactly how I am able to life on much less than many people and I have not worked since my mid 40s, about 15 years ago.

The only difference with me is that I did not choose to not work--it was forced upon me by a sudden disability. I now live just on Social Security Disability.

I may not have much money but what I do have is time; time to think; time to see life go by slowly; time to do my own cooking and not eat in restaurants; time to read; time to absorb knowledge.

Yes, I have time to do home maintenance but unfortunately my health is poor and some tasks are too difficult--I cannot climb a ladder but I do what I can do.

I live simply and enjoy the inexpensive pleasures that life has to offer. I now have time to explore all the parks in the Denver area. With these simple pleasures, I have no debt in my own little home which is mortgage free.

Retirement does not mean you have to to spend, and buy, and have expensive activities--it means time to enjoy and relish your life...slowly. It is amazing when you have time that you discover so many free and inexpensive activities. You can revisit areas of the city that you have explored too quickly. You can go back to museums and art galleries and absorb the experience at a slower pace. You can take up new pursuits and you can just BE and
Livecontent
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Old 09-30-2009, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,685 posts, read 49,462,974 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dave nz View Post
At the age of 31 would you? If not why not? and if so what would you get upto with your free time?
At 31?

Very hard to do.

I have known many men who got their pensions at 38, most continued working. Simply because even though they had a pension, they had no other assets or portfolio setup. A small pension is great if you own your home, or plan to settle in an extremely low-cost area. But generally such was not the case.

I got my pension at 42. I did own a few properties at that time, and I had been building my portfolio. So I was able to retire at that time. I have been retired for 8 years now.

I have 150 acres of forest land with river frontage, I built a house, I have been starting orchards and gardens, and marketing veggies in a Farmer's Market.

I hunt, I fish, I garden and I herd some livestock.



To answer your question; it depends on what your plans are, and how you have set yourself up for it.
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Old 10-01-2009, 05:21 AM
Ode
 
298 posts, read 686,720 times
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I would have bought some acreage, built a home on it, and started living life without the need to go somewhere else to work besides the place I really wanted to work on. Sometimes what you do for yourself (gardening, raising animals, etc) can seem like work to an outsider but be a completely different thing to the one living that way.

I would have had time to read more, paint, and enjoy more time with my spouse and children. We maybe could have traveled without worries that a job was calling us back before we wished to return, and visited relatives more often who lived too far away to visit on a more frequent basis with less pressing need to go home. We could have hired good help to care for our home and animals while we were away, so no worries about those things either.

In short, we could have done all the things we always wanted to do but couldn't because the responsibilities of a job kept us from doing them. My husband and I always thought it would have been interesting to volunteer on a Mayan archeology dig, take an eco vacation with the dolphins, sail around the world on a catamaran, visit all those countries with a rich history and ancient buildings, and go to school for the rest of our lives. Wouldn't it be great to be able to afford to take any classes that interested you in college and not have to worry about how to pay for it by getting a job after graduation? So many things we wanted to do, but couldn't. Responsibility kept us from them.
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Old 10-01-2009, 06:10 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,462,004 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
At 31?

Very hard to do.

I have known many men who got their pensions at 38, most continued working. Simply because even though they had a pension, they had no other assets or portfolio setup. A small pension is great if you own your home, or plan to settle in an extremely low-cost area. But generally such was not the case.

I got my pension at 42. I did own a few properties at that time, and I had been building my portfolio. So I was able to retire at that time. I have been retired for 8 years now.

I have 150 acres of forest land with river frontage, I built a house, I have been starting orchards and gardens, and marketing veggies in a Farmer's Market.

I hunt, I fish, I garden and I herd some livestock.



To answer your question; it depends on what your plans are, and how you have set yourself up for it.
Sounds like you have planned well.

I have to ask, do you have a spouse who is working, and if so, is her wages necessary to make the retirement work ?
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Old 10-01-2009, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,685 posts, read 49,462,974 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
Sounds like you have planned well.

I have to ask, do you have a spouse who is working, and if so, is her wages necessary to make the retirement work ?
My career included many transfers to different locations, during it all my Dw wanted to have a career [but it turned out as a series of dis-jointed jobs]. She did better with self-employed businesses [catering, laundromat, or apartment rentals] at each location.

She is now employed by the Federal government, part-time, at a local grocery store.

We bought our land, built the basic shell of a house and moved into it; before our savings ran-out.

My income is enough for us to live. Each year we expand our gardens, greenhouses, livestock and orchards.

Her p/t income means that our house gets furnished, a porch added on, a garage. A new tractor last winter that I would have never been able to afford on my pension alone.

My Dw likes having a 'career'.

She also likes to card wool, to make soaps, to can veggies, to butcher hogs [she loved taking classes on home butchering, and each of the cuts of meat. The grocery store put her into their meat department for 6-months where she learned more skills], grinding dry beans to make a wheat flour substitute is a big thing now.

She does not want to 'give-up' her involvement in the work-force. Nor does she want to give-up her farm-wife things either.

I suspect that she will continue with the government job until she gets her own pension.

Without her income our improvements would be much slower in evolving. The tractor alone has sped up many of the projects that I am doing.



"... to make the retirement work?" mmm, is a hard one.

We would be here. In our travels, we have seen there are few places stateside where the cost-of-living and taxes are low enough to allow anyone to retire on my pension.

Her income makes our retirement 'better'.

Her activity there makes it better for her. It is something that she needs to be doing.

Since December I have been stocking shelves at the grocery. It takes me one or maybe two hours each night. It pays me about $200/month. The pay is horrible, and I would not be doing it for so little pay. But it allows me to raid their dumpster for each day's rotted produce. I can bring home ~100 pounds of produce each day for our hogs.

Stocking shelves may not be an 'ideal' retirement pastime, does the cash help? Sure a small bit. The produce I gather allows me to feed our hogs for free. Which for us is a far greater benefit. It makes my retirement better.
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Old 10-02-2009, 06:17 AM
 
Location: DC Area, for now
3,517 posts, read 12,053,898 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
She is now employed by the Federal government, part-time, at a local grocery store.
I'm sorry, this caught my eye:

The Federal govt. runs a grocery store?
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