U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-05-2009, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,687 posts, read 49,462,974 times
Reputation: 19134

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
Aren't some of the military hospitals around the nations capital considered world class? Isn't that where some of the government elite go for treatment? I always thought the one in Bethesda was great.
Could be. I have no idea.

I did my Ad career and never was near DC [except once on a family vacation].

My medical treatment was done almost entirely by Hospital Corpsmen [HMs], 18 to 22 year olds with 6 weeks of training.

Mostly by IDCs [senior HMs who have attended a special 1-year school]; they perform blood work-ups, minor surgeries, set broken bones, write scripts, and whatnot. As well as treat our dependant spouses and children.

I was treated once by a doctor with a medical school diploma; I needed to swallow a video camera so they could video my ulcer. The doctor was the only guy who had access to the camera. It was mounted inside the end of a yard-long garden-hose looking thing. He was actually an Ob/Gyn, but he it was his camera so I had to go to him to get the pictures taken.

Our children were treated by HMs, for each of their growing scrapes and broken bones.

My Dw was treated by HMs for any of her issues.

I have had bones set, stitches, pretty much all of my medical treatment during my AD career was done by HMs.
[with the exception of those pictures of my ulcer].

I have been treated at Naval Hospitals as well as regular Navy Base 'MilMed's and onboard subs.

The Navy has a good budget, so I would think that they would have some fairly good equipment.

I only have a finite set of experiences dealing with the US military. I first enlisted in 1976 and I retired in 2001, so my experience with military medicine is not all inclusive.

The last time that I was in a Navy Hospital was in 2002, so it has been ages since then. No doubt it has all changed in the last few years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-05-2009, 04:48 PM
 
11,256 posts, read 43,421,010 times
Reputation: 14939
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iwillthink4u View Post
living in the U.S. has proven to be almost always about one thing! Retirement!
everyone is "living to retire!"....it's an ultimate goal and you better be ready for it!!! how silly! People don't understand that there needs to be a balance! live well now, prepare so you can live well later also! that's what i believe it should be!

i wanted to know if people here are overly concerned about retirement.....or have they found that balance. I'd also be interested in hearing about how much you've stashed away and at what age....

i'm 28, working for 6 years, 42k in 401k, 20k stocks, 75k equity in houses, and that's about it. most calculators put me at the bottom to midle of the chart as far as saving for retirement. I don't want to kill myself now with saving just so that i can have money in retirement (and then die at 75! lol)
I think you're on the right track that "retirement" isn't everything. The target is "freedom". Save your energy for what counts in life.

If you spend your working life doing things that you hate to do, and counting the days until you can "retire" from that occupation, then ... it's not worth it. Better, IMO, to find the things you love to do and your avocation and your vocation will be something to look forward to every day, even if the price you pay is a lower income (and then again, it might not be ....).

I loved cars and mechanical equipment. Put myself through school for a EE degree working my own business, catering to the college kids around me with all their cars and motorcycles. When it came time to get serious about a "career" in my field of study, I discovered that I already had a "career" and was very happy with it. At the time, I was making as much (or nearly so) money as I would have made working in a typical corporate job, only without all the "benefits". Screw it, I said, I'm having too much fun and living the life I wanted ... which may not have been the life that my folks wanted for me. But it was my life, and I settled in an area that they didn't like, I worked at a profession they didn't like, etc. etc. Too flippin' bad for their expectations, I was a poster child for a misguided and errant youth, but I built my business up to something that was adequate for my needs and investment goals.

I didn't save for a "rocking chair on the porch" retirement. Instead, I saved for the situation we wanted .... a paid-off ranch and farm, where we have a lot of work & business that can last as long as we want it to. Along the way, I acquired investment real estate and became a property manager. And cars, boats, motorcycles, airplanes, horses, livestock, and other "stuff".

I own CO resort area properties, and have the freedom to head up to the mountains when I choose for recreation, skiing, camping, fishing, hiking, sailing, and bicycling. But I learned years ago that you can't do those things every day (day-in, day-out) and keep them "special". So most of my time is spent farming, ranching ... and my travels as a manufacturer's rep.

I'm busier than ever in my life, working hard, and staying active. Still keeping my plane going and flying as much as I can for business and pleasure.
Absent a catastrophic illness or accident, I can see continuing doing this for another 30-40 years ... and having fun every lovely, gorgeous day.

IMO, it's not a case of working so your goal is to "stop and smell the roses" at the end of a career. Keep the roses accessible along the way and the fun factor in front of you. Do what you have to to earn a legitimate living, and consider how much of all the "stuff" you really need to have to impress yourself, not others. For some, a simple life is all it takes ... and I know a bunch of people who squeeze more fun out of a dollar than most ... they're pretty happy & healthy after a long ride in this life, still going strong. Interesting that so few of them have the ailments and infirmities that you see among so many people in retirement today ....


And yes, I'm past an age where I can draw SS.

Last edited by sunsprit; 10-05-2009 at 05:03 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2009, 05:08 PM
 
29,782 posts, read 34,876,173 times
Reputation: 11705
Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
Could be. I have no idea.

I did my Ad career and never was near DC [except once on a family vacation].

My medical treatment was done almost entirely by Hospital Corpsmen [HMs], 18 to 22 year olds with 6 weeks of training.

Mostly by IDCs [senior HMs who have attended a special 1-year school]; they perform blood work-ups, minor surgeries, set broken bones, write scripts, and whatnot. As well as treat our dependant spouses and children.

I was treated once by a doctor with a medical school diploma; I needed to swallow a video camera so they could video my ulcer. The doctor was the only guy who had access to the camera. It was mounted inside the end of a yard-long garden-hose looking thing. He was actually an Ob/Gyn, but he it was his camera so I had to go to him to get the pictures taken.

Our children were treated by HMs, for each of their growing scrapes and broken bones.

My Dw was treated by HMs for any of her issues.

I have had bones set, stitches, pretty much all of my medical treatment during my AD career was done by HMs.
[with the exception of those pictures of my ulcer].

I have been treated at Naval Hospitals as well as regular Navy Base 'MilMed's and onboard subs.

The Navy has a good budget, so I would think that they would have some fairly good equipment.

I only have a finite set of experiences dealing with the US military. I first enlisted in 1976 and I retired in 2001, so my experience with military medicine is not all inclusive.

The last time that I was in a Navy Hospital was in 2002, so it has been ages since then. No doubt it has all changed in the last few years.
Wow I guess the quality of service is tiered. Probably the best is in the nations capital from what you are saying. You would know from experience I just know about the ones in the capital.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2009, 01:06 PM
 
1,749 posts, read 3,988,190 times
Reputation: 4621
I'll turn 28 in two weeks, and sans an aggressive monthly savings rate, I got bupkus for retirement. I used to worry about it, but then I had an "office space" moment and sat down and crunched the numbers, and there's just no way in hell I'll be able to match my parents with their dual high three 75% pensions. If I'm lucky I'll make as much as they did in their last three years of employment, but even if I were to attain that status, I'm not going to forego life so that I can dump a bunch of cash into a 401K that will end up underfunded anyways (compared to a pension).

I'm totally embracing the "live a quality life now and let the chips fall where they may" strategy. I already forewent my twenties in college and grad school where I should have been dating and living with eyes wide open instead of couped up worrying about income and retirement calculation. I'm not talking about carpe diem, just about attempting to enjoy life today. The only thing that separates my parent's track to their finances and mine is the existence of a pension and an inflationary housing market. They had both, I got none. Where I'll have to make up the difference is in the child-bearing costs. I don't yet have children, but when I do, well.. they're just not going to get college paid for. The best they'll get is in-state tuition. If that's not good enough then good luck. Same with vehicles and downpayment assistance. My parents didn't have to save up for retirement/college funding out of their monthly salary, they had pension promises and cash-out refis; my future children are going to have to learn to do without. Take those pressures out of the equation and living comfortably becomes a heck of a lot more attainable for people my age then.

I'll continue searching for a job with a pension, but even those are watered down. Federal civil servants went from a 75% high three pension to the current FERS equivalent of 25-30% high three pension coupled to an optional TSP (401k), which I call a paycut. I figure I'll get a job like that and hope for the best, keep my monthly savings up and live within our means, and try to enjoy life as much as we can. If all else fails we'll work till we are physically unable to do so then we'll go on the dole. But I ain't worrying about it anymore that's for sure. I'm just loving waking up in the morning and breathing in without sweating the bills cause I'm not tying up my paycheck on a 401k.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2009, 02:46 PM
 
16,437 posts, read 19,142,944 times
Reputation: 9518
Forty years from now it'd be interesting to see how you feel about that decision.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2009, 03:02 PM
 
29,782 posts, read 34,876,173 times
Reputation: 11705
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bideshi View Post
Forty years from now it'd be interesting to see how you feel about that decision.
Yup it is almost as though he felt the need to be vindicated about it!

Was he looking for affirmation from us?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2009, 05:27 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,955,483 times
Reputation: 18050
For evey three people I run into that retired on their terms ;i run into one that was forced by somehting to retire either health or otherwsie. Always best to plan ahead for retirement IMO. Its hell being in a position that you can retire when this happens fro waht I have seen.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2009, 11:16 AM
 
8,204 posts, read 11,918,472 times
Reputation: 18019
Quote:
Originally Posted by hindsight2020 View Post
I'll continue searching for a job with a pension, but even those are watered down. Federal civil servants went from a 75% high three pension to the current FERS equivalent of 25-30% high three pension coupled to an optional TSP (401k), which I call a paycut.
Your comparisons are off a bit. FERS isn't as bad as you think. If your parents retired with a pension of 75%, that means that they worked for 39 1/2 years under CSRS. If a FERS employee works for 39 1/2 years, their basic pension would be 43.56%, not 25-30%. Moreover, in addition to the 43.56% basic annuity,FERS employees also get full Social Security credit, plus matching contributions on their TSP contributions up to 5% of salary.

All-in-all, a FERS employee can end up with a higher retirement income than a CSRS employee. The only difference is that a FERS employee must contribute to TSP to ensure a good retirement income. For CSRS employees, the TSP is a nice optional benefit.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2009, 01:08 PM
 
13,321 posts, read 25,569,771 times
Reputation: 20505
I do think the major speed bump for retirement and financial planning is wanting to be a parent and doing so. If you want to, of course, that's a major act in life and worth sacrificing for. But I see so many people just sort of lump into it, "isn't it normal?" or "That's what married people do" and they've set up the huge chunk of their working lives to necessarily go to children/family needs. It's a choice, not a given, and sure not a requirement. It's quite an expensive hobby, though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2009, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Alaska
5,356 posts, read 16,351,037 times
Reputation: 4023
Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
I do think the major speed bump for retirement and financial planning is wanting to be a parent and doing so. If you want to, of course, that's a major act in life and worth sacrificing for. But I see so many people just sort of lump into it, "isn't it normal?" or "That's what married people do" and they've set up the huge chunk of their working lives to necessarily go to children/family needs. It's a choice, not a given, and sure not a requirement. It's quite an expensive hobby, though.
For us, having a family just made a difference in how much we'll save before retirement and how we'll have to actively plan for taxes in the first couple of years, since we'll still have one finishing up college when I retire at 60. If my plan holds, saving more would just mean we have more to give away when we die, and we wouldn't have any kids to give it to.

The only reason I can say this is because we were lucky enough to stumble onto jobs with pension benefits. Had I continued on with jobs only offering a 401k, we would definitely be in a different position.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top