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Old 02-03-2011, 07:22 AM
 
9,181 posts, read 9,265,199 times
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i'm going to laugh at all you people who think retirement communities are age discriminatory,because you're not very educated about them.a huge percentage of those retired people have medical problems that prevent them from living in normal apartment housing.many cannot tolerate living in noisy,boomcar environments.with 20 somethings partying and carrying on and you can argue with me all you want,MOST normal apartment complexes fall into that catagory.it's not acceptable that a 60 year old person should have to get up at 1am and get dressed to knock on someone's door to ask them to be quieter..most elderly people NEED quiet at all times or MOST of the time in order to live comfortabely.
My parents told me a story about what life was like for them in their twenties following World War II. They were both veterans who returned from the war, got married, and were trying to rent an apartment. Landlord after landlord turned them down. For a time, they had to reside in a cramped home with a relative. Why were they turned out when they applied for housing? Because they had one child at the time. There was a housing shortage in virtually all of America after WWII and landlords (many of whom hadn't fought in the war) could afford to be real picky and choosy when they selected tenants. This policy of discriminating against children when it came to housing sometimes left my parents in tears.

Dad died about two years ago, but my ninety-one year old mother still chooses to live in a home in a neighborhood surrounded by families of all types. Across the street is a family with two girls, ages 11 and 15. Around her, live other couples with children at home, families with children that have grown up, and even families that have recently had a baby. When the girl scouts come by to sell cookies my mother always buys a box or two. At 91, and blind, she remains an active and beloved member of her community. She knows about the problems of most of the people around her. She knows about the job losses, misbehaving adolescents, and the trials her neighbors face getting through life. Her neighbors help her and she, in turn, helps them by listening to many of their travails and offering advice.

My mother has taught me a great lesson. It is through surrounding ourselves with people of all ages, races, and sexes that we develop qualities like empathy, sense of community, and compassion for others. I know that when my mother leaves this earth that she will be missed by all those whose lives she has enriched.

Some of us are able to see the benefits of a diverse community and wish to participate in one. Some do not. I wish you luck, sir. I wouldn't want you to be disturbed by the "noise" that other generations make.
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Old 02-03-2011, 07:26 AM
 
7,338 posts, read 16,634,853 times
Reputation: 4567
Will TOTALLY agree with this posting!! Or, should I say......"You tell 'em!!"

Quote:
Originally Posted by DJTEEL View Post
i'm going to laugh at all you people who think retirement communities are age discriminatory,because you're not very educated about them.a huge percentage of those retired people have medical problems that prevent them from living in normal apartment housing.many cannot tolerate living in noisy,boomcar environments.with 20 somethings partying and carrying on and you can argue with me all you want,MOST normal apartment complexes fall into that catagory.it's not acceptable that a 60 year old person should have to get up at 1am and get dressed to knock on someone's door to ask them to be quieter..most elderly people NEED quiet at all times or MOST of the time in order to live comfortabely.normal complexes(for lack of a better term),don't support the type of environment that encourages "quiet" at all times.retirement communities DO!!! i'm living in a retirement community(my third month here) and living in a normal community of 20 somethings is something i'll never ever plan on again.having to get out of bed at any time of night to be forced to get dressed and bang on someone's door to ask them to shut their sh*t down is something i won't go through again.ie,too loud too often!! that describes most 'normal' complexes!! you 20 somethings can complain all you want about age discrimination.the point is moot..it ain't going to change.as long as the elderly exist there will be living communities especially made for them. to you people who don't like that..live with it goofballs!!
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Old 02-03-2011, 10:36 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,651,778 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by DJTEEL View Post
i'm going to laugh at all you people who think retirement communities are age discriminatory,because you're not very educated about them.a huge percentage of those retired people have medical problems that prevent them from living in normal apartment housing.many cannot tolerate living in noisy,boomcar environments.with 20 somethings partying and carrying on and you can argue with me all you want,MOST normal apartment complexes fall into that catagory.it's not acceptable that a 60 year old person should have to get up at 1am and get dressed to knock on someone's door to ask them to be quieter..most elderly people NEED quiet at all times or MOST of the time in order to live comfortabely.normal complexes(for lack of a better term),don't support the type of environment that encourages "quiet" at all times.retirement communities DO!!! i'm living in a retirement community(my third month here) and living in a normal community of 20 somethings is something i'll never ever plan on again.having to get out of bed at any time of night to be forced to get dressed and bang on someone's door to ask them to shut their sh*t down is something i won't go through again.ie,too loud too often!! that describes most 'normal' complexes!! you 20 somethings can complain all you want about age discrimination.the point is moot..it ain't going to change.as long as the elderly exist there will be living communities especially made for them. to you people who don't like that..live with it goofballs!!
I have to go along with this as well. When the law was passed stating that it was illegal deny any rental units to families, I saw what was once nice apartment complexes destroyed by rouge children. They wrecked the landscaping and destroyed items on peoples' patios. The buildings began to look like slums. There was overcrowding and destruction of property.

It wasn't so much the kids' fault since these apartment buildings were not designed for children and when kids are looking for a place to play or something to do they can wreck havoc. But the parents insisted upon squeezing too many kids in too small apartments because they were cheap.

I feel sorry for the OP but I wonder if he would be better served looking for a place that will take him and his wife (he never really said why he is being turned down for rentals or did I miss that?) than trying to change the rules put in place by people who choose to live a certain way.
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Old 02-04-2011, 12:37 PM
 
4,571 posts, read 7,054,651 times
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I live in a large apt complex where people of all ages and life situations live. I'm very lucky because management does try to group us "older" folks together and people with kids together in buildilngs as much as possible, which is nice of them and appreciated.

I do know, however, based on an experience with an elderly friend of mine who lived here...that when they felt she was "too old" to live by herself, they seem to have found a way to make her move out. I really thought it was none of their business and she was paying her rent and not bothering anyone. I don't think it's their responsibility, liability wise, if anything happened to her, if she falls down, etc. That could happen to anyone at any age, so I did think they were discriminating against her in that way.

I have some other friends who live there and the husband fell recently and may or may not be able to get up and down the stairs by himself anymore (depending on how his rehab goes), so I will be interested in seeing if management gets involved in their situation...I hope not!
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Old 02-02-2014, 06:57 AM
 
1 posts, read 577 times
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What if you have a property that is 55+ due to parent passing away still trying to sell it son lives their now maintains it pays me the housing fees.now he has to move out because of the age rules now iam stuck with the housing fees and lot maintance does he qualify for the 20% in the80/20 rule. The problem is he works minutes from this place and can't afford the rent in the area he would wind up traveling 30+ minutes to and from
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Old 02-02-2014, 07:14 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,141,087 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stormycat View Post
What if you have a property that is 55+ due to parent passing away still trying to sell it son lives their now maintains it pays me the housing fees.now he has to move out because of the age rules now iam stuck with the housing fees and lot maintance does he qualify for the 20% in the80/20 rule. The problem is he works minutes from this place and can't afford the rent in the area he would wind up traveling 30+ minutes to and from
Maybe someone else can decipher what you mean by the 80/20 rule. ????

I have no idea what you are referring to.

However, if the home is located in a 55+ community, then yes, the person you have rented it to, regardless of whether he is your son or a stranger off the street, must be 55 or older.

You may also be in conflict with the covenants of the 55+ community by renting the property. This varies from community to community.

I would assume when you write that "he has to move out," that you have received notice from the HOA that you are in violation of the covenants.

Your solution would be to rent the house to someone over 55 until such time as you can sell it (assuming your HOA allows owners to rent their property).
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Old 02-02-2014, 02:21 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,093 posts, read 13,225,721 times
Reputation: 14870
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stormycat View Post
What if you have a property that is 55+ due to parent passing away still trying to sell it son lives their now maintains it pays me the housing fees.now he has to move out because of the age rules now iam stuck with the housing fees and lot maintance does he qualify for the 20% in the80/20 rule. The problem is he works minutes from this place and can't afford the rent in the area he would wind up traveling 30+ minutes to and from
Your son needs a roommate.
Over the age of 55.
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Old 02-02-2014, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Florida
19,776 posts, read 19,880,941 times
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The 80/20 rule refers to the fact that 20% of the properties may be used by those under 55 ...or have under 55 person(s)that don't qualify living with a resident .
If the community has that 20% been used no more allowances can be made.
Generally, if the son had been the one to inherit, more consideration might be given to him, but in this case, you inherited and are renting it out. There's not going to be a lot of leeway given for an inheritor that rents it out.
Only the board or management company in charge can answer the question in any particular instance

A roommate over 55 would not make it OK. An over 55 owner must live there .
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Old 02-02-2014, 03:41 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,847 posts, read 30,345,392 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by superk View Post
I'm not sure this is the right forum for this topic, but I'm not sure where else to post it.

Is it legal to be excluded from housing options strictly because of your age? Why is the age, and not the circumstances, more important?
The only 100 percent protected class is race. There are circumstances where people can be discriminated against in housing with regard to age, religion, family status, etc. You would have to review the statutes of your state to determine if your situation is applicable to laws governing this matter.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 02-02-2014, 09:13 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,890,268 times
Reputation: 18049
Why would public or private invest in special needs housing at expense and then rent to non-special needs person even based on age needs. Makes no sense at all.
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