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Old 10-28-2009, 05:31 AM
 
2,845 posts, read 3,934,653 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boompa
Forbes Lists seem to be made up by first year journalism students
Quote:
Kevxu:

No, the Forbes list is made up for its readership, and that readership is not composed of Joe Sixpacks or any of his near relatives.
Ah, check out the different prepositions:

Boompa said the list seems to be made up by first year journalism students.

You say that is is made up for its readership.

Both of you could be correct, eh?

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Old 10-28-2009, 05:41 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by somwhathip View Post
Interesting comments, all. The Forbes article is pretty interesting, and obviously aimed at pretty affluent crowd. My pick for people with more normal resources would be Panama -they use the US dollar, very stable government, lots of places to live for expats.

If you are thinking about the expat life, check out my 10 tips to consider before you retire abroad,which was inspired by the Fortune article
You wrote that? Is that your website? Interesting. I am taking liberty to copy your ten items (without the additional comments). This is a pretty good list IMHO for evaluating foreign retirement locations.

1. Investigate the crime rate.
2. Can you take living far away from friends and family?
3. Consider what medical care is available, and at what cost.
4. Will you have to live in a gated enclave?
5. Check out the tax situation.
6. Evaluate the political situation.
7. Are you OK with widespread poverty.
8. Will you be welcome as a resident?
9. How will you get money sent to yourself.
10. Just how adventurous are you.

Using these 10 criteria, I can say that Malaysia is a plus in all columns except for #2: Living far away from friends and family. Any trip back to the USA will be expensive since it entails at least 5 flights, one-way, for me. Five airline tickets. Expensive.

In Malaysia, there is no need to live in a gated enclave. Neither is there widespread poverty. One is not really welcome to become a Permanent Resident, but the government has made it fairly easy to obtain a retirement visa (good for up to 10 years at a time).

Thanks for the link.
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Old 10-28-2009, 06:29 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by somwhathip View Post
Interesting comments, all. The Forbes article is pretty interesting, and obviously aimed at pretty affluent crowd. My pick for people with more normal resources would be Panama -they use the US dollar, very stable government, lots of places to live for expats.

If you are thinking about the expat life, check out my 10 tips to consider before you retire abroad,which was inspired by the Fortune article
Will Panama still be using the US dollar when it 10cents against the Euro?
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Old 10-28-2009, 06:47 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wingfoot View Post
Will Panama still be using the US dollar when it 10cents against the Euro?
Yeah, I am not a big fan of the printing presses either, but the Wall Street Journal just today came out with an article ("Globally, the Greenback Remains King") about the continuing popularity of the greenback on the world's black markets. It is a subscriber-only article, so I will not post the link, but here are some key quotes:

"Typically, dollars are king in the black markets of the world," says Kenneth Rogoff, professor of economics at Harvard University and former chief economist at the International Monetary Fund.

Prof. Rogoff estimates that as much as 75% of U.S. notes in circulation, or more than $600 billion, are held outside the U.S. Most of that is likely in what he calls the underground economy, where transactions are made beyond the oversight of government -- much of which is juiced by the black market.

"This money is not in cash registers, it's not in bank vaults," Prof. Rogoff says.

At the end of the day, people vote with their feet, i.e., they pick up the currency that they feel is safest.
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Old 10-28-2009, 06:47 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob-666 View Post
I think Forbes assumes its readership to be rich ! To qualify for a retiree's visa to Australia for example, you need to invest A$500,000 in government bonds, have an additional A$500,000 in assets, have a pension of A$50,000 pa and comprehensive private medical insurance. After all that the visa is only good for 4 years then you have to re-qualify to extend it. Piece of cake if you're a millionaire otherwise forget it !
No one in their right mind whose income/assets are in US dollars will retire overseas.

Of course if can exchange a few million $ for Euros or Swiss Francs even at current 3 for 2 a whole "nother ballgame.
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Old 10-28-2009, 06:50 AM
 
1,340 posts, read 2,491,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Teak View Post
Yeah, I am not a big fan of the printing presses either, but the Wall Street Journal just today came out with an article ("Globally, the Greenback Remains King") about the continuing popularity of the greenback on the world's black markets. It is a subscriber-only article, so I will not post the link, but here are some key quotes:

"Typically, dollars are king in the black markets of the world," says Kenneth Rogoff, professor of economics at Harvard University and former chief economist at the International Monetary Fund.

Prof. Rogoff estimates that as much as 75% of U.S. notes in circulation, or more than $600 billion, are held outside the U.S. Most of that is likely in what he calls the underground economy, where transactions are made beyond the oversight of government -- much of which is juiced by the black market.

"This money is not in cash registers, it's not in bank vaults," Prof. Rogoff says.

At the end of the day, people vote with their feet, i.e., they pick up the currency that they feel is safest.
Dumb Professor, 600 billion is an insignificant amount of total debt/deposit amounts of US dollars.
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Old 10-30-2009, 11:03 AM
 
2,024 posts, read 2,986,054 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wingfoot View Post
No one in their right mind whose income/assets are in US dollars will retire overseas.

Of course if can exchange a few million $ for Euros or Swiss Francs even at current 3 for 2 a whole "nother ballgame.
I have friends who retired to the UK from the US. One half of the couple is a UK citizen so they were entitled. All income is in dollars. So the house they bought here which was 200,000 pounds was actually (at the time) $400,000. Ouch.
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Old 11-05-2009, 06:26 PM
 
12,671 posts, read 21,050,646 times
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Thailand is great for Single Men.
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Old 11-06-2009, 06:01 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas User View Post
Thailand is great for Single Men.
......to lose their money.

Check out the true stories posted at (google) "Stickman Bangkok".
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Old 11-07-2009, 11:28 AM
 
12,671 posts, read 21,050,646 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Teak View Post
......to lose their money.

Check out the true stories posted at (google) "Stickman Bangkok".
I thought prostitution and massages were really cheap there?
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