U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-28-2009, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,745 posts, read 4,217,509 times
Reputation: 6866

Advertisements

Unless your husband's impairments meet a "listing" (unlikely) SSA will look to see if your husband can perform ANY occupation found in significant numbers in the national economy. If your husband's highest level of education is a high school diploma AND his impairments limit him to light work (can't lift more than 10 pounds frequently/20 pounds occasionally, walk for up to 6 hrs in 8 hr day) AND his skills are not transferable to other jobs - the grids direct a finding of disabled. However, if his physical limitations fall somewhere between light and medium, he will probably receive an initial denial. Depending on your state, he would either have to request a reconsideration (at the state level) or request a hearing before an administrative law judge. (Some states skip the reconsideration stage.) He does not need to go to the field office to apply - he can apply online. The file is now electronic. SSA, at his request, will provide him a CD of the exhibits prior to the hearing.

Listing of Impairments - Adult Listings (Part A)

The "grid" Appendix 2 to Subpart P (http://www.ssa.gov/OP_Home/cfr20/404/404-ap11.htm - broken link)
exertional levels:
20 CFR 404.1567
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-28-2009, 07:32 PM
 
Location: SE Florida
1,194 posts, read 3,689,701 times
Reputation: 754
An attorney is not a catch all for problems and sometimes a person can come across a really good one who will really work for their potential pay. After 5 years of arguing and several doctors providing SS with appropriate evidence that she cannot work now or in the future, my brother's wife was appproved for SSD.

She worked for 34 years prior and the last 5 years she was unable to work. Her claim was approved two days before the SS time element for accepting proof of work would have expired. Talk about close...

..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-30-2009, 06:16 PM
 
3,071 posts, read 7,718,533 times
Reputation: 1623
I can tell you this for sure. It takes up to three years to get to a judge to ok it. Its also very hard to prove you cant do anything. They dont care about what you used to do ,If you cant do anything but sit and answer a phone they will say you can work and you will be disapproved.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-31-2009, 08:52 PM
 
56 posts, read 165,247 times
Reputation: 46
SSD is ran by bureaucrats and the make decisions based on written guidelines.
If you apply and give them everything they ask for then you will be approved. Make follow up calls and make sure your Dr. returns there letter asap as that is important to the process.
Remember to follow their directions completely..and be sure your medical documentation is current.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-31-2009, 11:32 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,664,674 times
Reputation: 35449
You have to work for it and make certain all your i's are dotted and t's are crossed. I watched a friend of mine who had a major heart disease which she had since childhood go through all the SSI hoops. When the time came that she could no longer work at all she applied and suffered the bureaucratic obstacles put in her way. It took time but eventually she was successful. So the point is you have to be very patient, cooperative and be prepared to wait.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-01-2010, 05:38 AM
 
Location: Hawaii
1,685 posts, read 3,761,401 times
Reputation: 3053
Default Great Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
No, you are incorrect. It states:

"Disability under Social Security for an adult is based on your inability to work because of a medical condition. To be considered disabled:

* You must be unable to do work you did before and we decide that you cannot adjust to other work because of a medical condition.
* Your disability must last or be expected to last for at least one year or to result in death"

Essentially, it means if you can do any substantial work, you are not disabled. Obviously, as you get older, they types of jobs you can do become more limited and that is why age is taken into consideration.

It also does not mean because you are suffering from age related problems and degenerative conditions that you are automatically disabled because you no longer can do your current job, as good as when you where young. That would mean that a football player because he cannot longer play after age 40, is considered disabled. How about ballet dancers, are they disabled after they reach their prime??? No, if they can do other jobs. If you have problems standing, then you can do a job sitting down--answering a phone, doing assembly work in a workshop, office work etc. It is then that educational background is taken in consideration because you may not be able to adapt to some jobs; you may not have the ability to learn simple tasks etc.

Livecontent
Excellent information! I am beginning 'the process' to which you speak of and, may I say, your knowledge is quiet impressive. It saved me many steps. Thank-you.
tyvin















e
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-01-2010, 01:41 PM
 
13,319 posts, read 25,561,639 times
Reputation: 20505
I believe personal or employer disability claims are defined more specifically, like you can't do the job you've been doing. I have certainly heard tough stories about Soc. Sec. denying people who are in very tough shape. I think having a social worker involved can help- I see so many people who are mentally ill, somewhat emotionally troubled, or substance abusing on disability, and they are well under 55. What I don't get is I thought the claims were supposed to be reevaluated at some point. One guy I know, his 44-year-old wife has been on SSDI for four years (and plans to stay there for life) because she has panic attacks in interviews after a bad experience. In this economy, I can't think, "Get a job" but when there were or are jobs, I think someone like that should work.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-01-2010, 08:53 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,547,490 times
Reputation: 6928
Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
I believe personal or employer disability claims are defined more specifically, like you can't do the job you've been doing. I have certainly heard tough stories about Soc. Sec. denying people who are in very tough shape. I think having a social worker involved can help- I see so many people who are mentally ill, somewhat emotionally troubled, or substance abusing on disability, and they are well under 55. What I don't get is I thought the claims were supposed to be reevaluated at some point. One guy I know, his 44-year-old wife has been on SSDI for four years (and plans to stay there for life) because she has panic attacks in interviews after a bad experience. In this economy, I can't think, "Get a job" but when there were or are jobs, I think someone like that should work.
All recipients of Social Security Disability are reevaluated on a fixed schedule. The review period is based on the ability of improvement in the disability. The recipient does not determine the review dates, nor can the recipient "plan to stay there for life". Social Security will not state that a person in on permanent disability; you can only get a statement that you are receiving disability payments. Yes, there are some disabilities that are so severe that will never disappear, but they are still reviewed.

Disability determined under insurance policies are not determined in the same way as Social Security Disability. One does not guarantee the determination for the other.

Mental disorders are one of the largest claims for social security disability and consequently one of the largest approved. However, be assured that determination of mental disability is very specific and codified. You cannot make a judgmental statement that "somewhat like that should work". You would not know that specifics and the extent of their mental disability. In additional determination of disability covers many factors as to the effects of multiple disabilities, age, education, the effects of medications to control disabilities etc. There is much that goes into the decisions.

Livecontent
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-03-2010, 04:22 AM
 
Location: zippidy doo dah
895 posts, read 1,331,326 times
Reputation: 1928
Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
Mental disorders are one of the largest claims for social security disability and consequently one of the largest approved. However, be assured that determination of mental disability is very specific and codified. You cannot make a judgmental statement that "somewhat like that should work". You would not know that specifics and the extent of their mental disability. In additional determination of disability covers many factors as to the effects of multiple disabilities, age, education, the effects of medications to control disabilities etc. There is much that goes into the decisions.

Livecontent
interesting thread here -I do appreciate the quote above because there is so much we don't know about the complexity of anyone's case. I've always been a "buck-up and deal with it person". Perhaps that is why "stuff happens". we find through our own experiences or the experiences of those close to us that situations are so much more multi-dimensional than we could ever comprehend. Experience is a "dear" teacher, as Ben Franklin once said.

for the original poster, i actually applied for disability on the advice of a counselor at age 55 approaching 56. when i was turned down (which i had been assured would happen), i did not appeal - just threw up my hands and said "figures". several months later, i realized that not dealing with things was actually a choice, albiet not a good one, and i decided to pick up the task again and re-apply, which of course meant the process started again -a hideous thought. at that point, i was 56 approaching 57. because it was technically a new claim, an attorney was not involved (they generally do not become involved until one is appealing).

while i assumed that the process would involve hiring an attorney at a point, i didn't end up going that route. long story short, i was approved and placed on disability or whatever the proper term is/retired on disability perhaps? the process is arduous in some ways because it feels like you are answering the same questions again and again - while i found the people in most offices were very decent people, the people who conducted on-phone interviews coupled with some office experiences were beyond description. i attempted to rationallze that curtness and exasperation were part of the weeding-one-out process and that some employees of social security should be retired on social ineptness disability. but of course it could be perhaps a tendency to be overly-sensitive and just too darn southernly-gracious on my part. ( i don't think so but i'll consider that, bless their hearts).

Again, i actually was one of those who did not have to use an attorney to get approved. I was very honest with the process/probably verbal to a fault to get my points across. I should not have allowed the first time limit to appeal lapse but that actually in some ways was an illustration of what was going on within my life. I assume that will cost me financially but I'm not entirely certain of that since I did pick up the process shortly thereafter. At the time, it was just what was to be. The question of course would remain what the cost would have been had i had an attorney on appeal compared to handling the painful process on my own through two separate applications. Either way, I am relieved to be done with the process. It was very frustrating/taxing emotionally/but it was resolved. If this gives someone else the resolve to be vigilant, then my experience is of increased intrinsic value.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-24-2013, 10:43 PM
 
3 posts, read 6,873 times
Reputation: 10
This is an old thread but after reading the posts I wanted to put my 2 cent question in lol

Here's the story - I honestly believe this started in 1976 with a high fever from the flu. I have chronic vertigo that began in 1979,yes 1979 and not a day or even an hour passes that i'm not dizzy or off balance to some degree.Never worked except helping parents farm (milk cows,hay,corn,tobacco) but never had a weekly or monthly paycheck. I can't drive (since 2000) but I do keep my license up to date. I signed up for ssi about a month ago at age 55. With medical records going back at least 15 years at the same clinic and possibly more going back to 79. From what I understand SSA wants positive proof of a disability,i've not had any scans but have had a lot of tests,blood,oxy,hearing, common standing sitting bending - all that stuff for the doc's reports. I was denied medicaid a few weeks ago. I guess what i'm asking is - do I have a chance at ssi?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top