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Old 06-03-2010, 09:39 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,487,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yankinscotland View Post
Those are the official years, yes. I agree, just too broad.
I also agree. I was born in 1946, placing me in the vanguard of the Boomers. I graduated from high school in 1964. People born in that year have nothing in common with me; to include a war in which I fought. Theirs have been far different.

So now two months from age 64, retired with grown children and a passle of grandchildren, I'm glad I experienced the end of the 40's, came of age in the 50's and survived the 60s and 70s. Best of all, now I get to rest!
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Old 06-04-2010, 06:32 AM
 
Location: DC Area, for now
3,517 posts, read 12,052,621 times
Reputation: 2141
64 seems much too late. I had heard the cutoff was 62 - still too late. I think a cutoff of 1959 makes more sense. I was born in the 2nd peak year 54. 55 was the peak. I have a sibling born in 43 and the last was in 57. It was a big and long generation.
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Old 06-04-2010, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,668,169 times
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First "peaker" here. I was born in 1946. The boomer title was bestowed by the media. It really doesn't mean a whole lot as far as I am concerned.
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Old 06-05-2010, 01:53 AM
 
2,024 posts, read 2,987,604 times
Reputation: 1812
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tesaje View Post
64 seems much too late. I had heard the cutoff was 62 - still too late. I think a cutoff of 1959 makes more sense. I was born in the 2nd peak year 54. 55 was the peak. I have a sibling born in 43 and the last was in 57. It was a big and long generation.
In my family it was sister '50, me 52, brothers 56 and 61. And we're supposedly all boomers.
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Old 06-05-2010, 05:11 AM
 
Location: zippidy doo dah
895 posts, read 1,331,660 times
Reputation: 1928
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestCobb View Post
I'm 33. This quote by FDR provides some insight into how I feel about the Boomers: "There is a mysterious cycle in human events. To some generations much is given. Of other generations much is expected. This generation of Americans has a rendezvous with destiny."

Your generation was given much, and I look around and wonder: where's it at? I don't resent you guys. I hope you enjoyed the blessed day in the sun you got to live. I don't identify with you guys though. As a soldier, I have spent the last nine years at war. I have been away from my family about 50 percent of that time.

Both of my parents also died at an early age, leaving me with nothing but bills. No worries. It was a pleasure to pay for their funeral expenses. They were good people. My sisters and I gave them the burial respects they deserved. (Their parents paid for their own funerals and left modest inheritences... I suppose the hardships that the FDR generation endured taught them the flaws of "na na na live for today" .. or rather, they realized that those who live for today leave bills for others to pay.)

I paid for my own college education, of course. I am now saving to pay for my daughter's college education. (I don't want her to have to spend her 20s working off thousands of dollars of debt, as I did... it gives me joy to think that she won't begin life with a debt hanging over her head as I had to.)

As I save for my daughter's college education, I am also saving for my wife's parents' retirement who are now pushing 60. In true Booomer fashion, they didnt' save a dime, of course. I am currently trying to figure out how I am going to afford building an addition on to my house without sacrificing my daughter's future or my wife's. I am a little bit resentful, but I actually love my in-laws. They are good, open-hearted, sincere people. They have the childlike innocence of those who think that watching a person get shot on television brings wisdom. There is something charming about this. Besides, as my grandpa (the guy who came of age in the Depression, grew up to fight WWII and then spent his adulthood working hard with his head down to raise a family) would say: blood is blood. It makes my wife very happy to know that we will be able to keep her parents from destitude in their old age. I don't mind driving a 14-year-old car and spending months away from home to make her happy.

I also shake my head and think about the .75 on the dollar I'm going to collect in social security (if I'm lucky). I think about the pensions that were wiped out in the 70s and 80s, the unions that fell into disarray, the off-shoring of jobs due to global trade agreements, the erosion of manufacturing, etc. I wonder how a generation that showed brilliance in one area and one area only -- political activism -- could have allowed this to happen, and I just think: wow. You Boomers were given a very rich field. It's a shame you didn't tend it better. Some days, I wonder if I will ever be able to get back to where grandpa started, but I'm going to try. I suppose that's my rendezvous with destiny.

Thank you sincerely for the music. It's good. I bet my daughter (whom you bet I'm going to do everything I can to give the moon) will identify with you guys more than I do. (Brats )
Just a thought - if you see the flaws in the upbringing of a generation/a generation whom "much was given", why would you continue the flawed philosophy of "giving the moon" to your daughter? I'm confused on that.
And honestly, if your in-laws are not yet sixty, I'm not completely sure why you are responsible for their retirement. Not to be mean but you seem to be complaining about what you enable. Sounds like it is time for you to set your bounderies or accept the fact that you are making a choice to act as some sort of patriarch to the greater family.

As a boomer, I have tended my field, not perfectly but I have paid my own way and don't expect anyone to take care of me (and they have rightfully not taken on that responsibility). I am not responsible for the real estate market or the stock market or the job market going bust, blowing my portfolio straight to hell but I'll survive.

But sometimes I do get a bit weary of hearing how the generation prior to us did it so right. They reared us/they formed the little world we stepped into - materialistic/concentrated on the nuclear family and the hell with everyone else/focused on attaining degrees and the best pay to achieve happiness/and a by-jingo attitude that no other country was quite like the USA. My generation, whether from a narrow definition of what a boomer is or from the more broad interpretation, did not create the post-war world we grew up in. We just got to come of age in it. (everyone cover your head and get under your school desk so the bomb won't hurt you when it drops................. )

PS - i think it's time to ask your in-laws what their plans are for retirement/why is that your responsibility? ask your daughter what she is doing with her college degree or is this the customary finishing school experience that many college degrees are providing? and as for spending the last nine years at war, I'm truly at a loss understanding why this country is pouring the money into one situation after another that has as much possibility of "positive" resolution as Vietnam.

Ok, now I'm going to search my car but again and see what happened to my medicine which probably explains my being less than my usually highly tactful and diplomatic self but I suppose I read this post and thought - exactly what are you complaining about?
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Old 06-05-2010, 06:53 AM
 
28,242 posts, read 39,901,543 times
Reputation: 36747
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestCobb View Post
I'm 33. This quote by FDR provides some insight into how I feel about the Boomers: "There is a mysterious cycle in human events. To some generations much is given. Of other generations much is expected. This generation of Americans has a rendezvous with destiny."

Your generation was given much, and I look around and wonder: where's it at? I don't resent you guys. I hope you enjoyed the blessed day in the sun you got to live. I don't identify with you guys though. As a soldier, I have spent the last nine years at war. I have been away from my family about 50 percent of that time.

Both of my parents also died at an early age, leaving me with nothing but bills. No worries. It was a pleasure to pay for their funeral expenses. They were good people. My sisters and I gave them the burial respects they deserved. (Their parents paid for their own funerals and left modest inheritences... I suppose the hardships that the FDR generation endured taught them the flaws of "na na na live for today" .. or rather, they realized that those who live for today leave bills for others to pay.)

I paid for my own college education, of course. I am now saving to pay for my daughter's college education. (I don't want her to have to spend her 20s working off thousands of dollars of debt, as I did... it gives me joy to think that she won't begin life with a debt hanging over her head as I had to.)

As I save for my daughter's college education, I am also saving for my wife's parents' retirement who are now pushing 60. In true Booomer fashion, they didnt' save a dime, of course. I am currently trying to figure out how I am going to afford building an addition on to my house without sacrificing my daughter's future or my wife's. I am a little bit resentful, but I actually love my in-laws. They are good, open-hearted, sincere people. They have the childlike innocence of those who think that watching a person get shot on television brings wisdom. There is something charming about this. Besides, as my grandpa (the guy who came of age in the Depression, grew up to fight WWII and then spent his adulthood working hard with his head down to raise a family) would say: blood is blood. It makes my wife very happy to know that we will be able to keep her parents from destitude in their old age. I don't mind driving a 14-year-old car and spending months away from home to make her happy.

I also shake my head and think about the .75 on the dollar I'm going to collect in social security (if I'm lucky). I think about the pensions that were wiped out in the 70s and 80s, the unions that fell into disarray, the off-shoring of jobs due to global trade agreements, the erosion of manufacturing, etc. I wonder how a generation that showed brilliance in one area and one area only -- political activism -- could have allowed this to happen, and I just think: wow. You Boomers were given a very rich field. It's a shame you didn't tend it better. Some days, I wonder if I will ever be able to get back to where grandpa started, but I'm going to try. I suppose that's my rendezvous with destiny.

Thank you sincerely for the music. It's good. I bet my daughter (whom you bet I'm going to do everything I can to give the moon) will identify with you guys more than I do. (Brats )
This is a situation that is not new at all. I grew up living in my grandfathers house because my parents had six children and lost everything in the Great Depression. They had nothing but the house he left them when he died. They both worked until the day they died.

Just because we keep hearing that everything was peaches and roses for the Boomer generation doesn't mean it's true. It just means someone has to be blamed for the troubles those complainers are experiencing. Funny thing, though. I don't remember my parents ever blaming some previous generation for their woes. They just worked to stay afloat.

I agree with the previous poster that you are an enabler.
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Old 06-05-2010, 08:08 AM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,943,432 times
Reputation: 18050
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
You reminded me of when we used to hide under our desks in school so the giant nuclear fire ball didnt get us..

how funny is that, hiding under a wooden desk ha ha ha

guess we were the tinder....
duck and cover. Strange by the time you got in the military they chnaged it to get in a hole and cover with your Poncho. We always figured it was to melt the poncho as a body bag over you and just have to shovel in some dirt.Much neater and less messas our parents taught us.My guess is that came from being the child of a parent that alwsy made you change to clean underwear before going to the doctor even if you just put new ones on three hours ago.
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Old 06-05-2010, 05:47 PM
 
12,050 posts, read 11,150,163 times
Reputation: 10009
Quote:
Originally Posted by triciajeanne View Post
Just a thought - if you see the flaws in the upbringing of a generation/a generation whom "much was given", why would you continue the flawed philosophy of "giving the moon" to your daughter? I'm confused on that.
And honestly, if your in-laws are not yet sixty, I'm not completely sure why you are responsible for their retirement. Not to be mean but you seem to be complaining about what you enable. Sounds like it is time for you to set your bounderies or accept the fact that you are making a choice to act as some sort of patriarch to the greater family.

As a boomer, I have tended my field, not perfectly but I have paid my own way and don't expect anyone to take care of me (and they have rightfully not taken on that responsibility). I am not responsible for the real estate market or the stock market or the job market going bust, blowing my portfolio straight to hell but I'll survive.

But sometimes I do get a bit weary of hearing how the generation prior to us did it so right. They reared us/they formed the little world we stepped into - materialistic/concentrated on the nuclear family and the hell with everyone else/focused on attaining degrees and the best pay to achieve happiness/and a by-jingo attitude that no other country was quite like the USA. My generation, whether from a narrow definition of what a boomer is or from the more broad interpretation, did not create the post-war world we grew up in. We just got to come of age in it. (everyone cover your head and get under your school desk so the bomb won't hurt you when it drops................. )

PS - i think it's time to ask your in-laws what their plans are for retirement/why is that your responsibility? ask your daughter what she is doing with her college degree or is this the customary finishing school experience that many college degrees are providing? and as for spending the last nine years at war, I'm truly at a loss understanding why this country is pouring the money into one situation after another that has as much possibility of "positive" resolution as Vietnam.

Ok, now I'm going to search my car but again and see what happened to my medicine which probably explains my being less than my usually highly tactful and diplomatic self but I suppose I read this post and thought - exactly what are you complaining about?
Thank you for taking the time to write this lengthy response. I'm not really complaining about anything. I realize after a certain age we all make our own beds. (And choosing to support my in-laws in their old age is my choice.)

Just like some Boomers might get annoyed by everyone going on and on about the Greatest Generation, us Xers sometimes get annoyed by the Boomers going on about how great the party was. Personally, I identify much more with my grandparents then my parents. My life has been about hard work and sacrifice. I wasn't given anything, but I have been expected to give back .. plenty. I don't agree with the Iraq war either, by the way, but I do have more of a stereotypically "Greatest" response to it than Boomer one: I feel like .. well, my country right or wrong. If my country is going to be in a fight, I'm going to stand with it.

I realize my post was a) a bit too specific to my own circumstances and b) not appreciative enough of the legacy the Boomers did leave us. You guys left us with a legacy of greater racial and gender equality, and I do sincerely appreciate that. My white 8-year-old daughter has just as many black friends as she does white ones, and she'd look at me like I were crazy if I told her that there was as fundamental difference between white people and black people. To her, that would be like saying that curly haired and straight haired people were incompatible and couldn't be friends. I also have the fullest confidence that no one is ever going to make her feel second best in her career because she's a "girl." I have the Boomers to thank for that.

I believe life moves in cycles, and every generation has a part to play. It's not becoming for any generation (the so called Greatest, the Boomers, the Xers, the Millennials and beyond) to discount the contributions of the previous and prior ones. I apologize for giving short shrift to yours.

As for my daughter, I will consider it the biggest failure of my life if I can't pay for her college education in full. We discuss on an almost daily basis various ways she can make the greatest contribution to the greater good through her career -- she'll probably become a teacher like her mom, but who knows? She tells me, dad, I think I'll just become an actor .. uh, lol... my response is that the world needs another "celebrity" like it needs a hole in the head and I would be very dissappointed if she grew up to be one.
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Old 06-05-2010, 05:57 PM
 
12,050 posts, read 11,150,163 times
Reputation: 10009
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
This is a situation that is not new at all. I grew up living in my grandfathers house because my parents had six children and lost everything in the Great Depression. They had nothing but the house he left them when he died. They both worked until the day they died.

Just because we keep hearing that everything was peaches and roses for the Boomer generation doesn't mean it's true. It just means someone has to be blamed for the troubles those complainers are experiencing. Funny thing, though. I don't remember my parents ever blaming some previous generation for their woes. They just worked to stay afloat.

I agree with the previous poster that you are an enabler.
I realize I was over generalizing, Tek. Sorry. No, I don't blame the Boomers for all my woes, and no, I'm not an enabler. My wife's parents are a special case. I could write novels about them and their circumstances, but that would be off topic to this thread. Yes, I will end up supporting them their old age.. no, I don't mind (most days) and no, I don't blame the Boomers for this. When it comes to not understanding the importance of saving, there's plenty of blame to go around in America. Cheers.
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Old 06-05-2010, 06:00 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,847 posts, read 30,364,616 times
Reputation: 22356
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
We grew up right in that little window before aids and right after the invention of the birth control pill lol
OMG what fun we had! I remember it well - and fondly.

20yrsinBranson
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