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Old 05-31-2010, 04:54 AM
 
2,179 posts, read 6,625,145 times
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I was born after the invention of antibiotics and before the xbox, I got to watch TV and movies without the swear words and sex in the movies was left for us to imagine, kids today have no imagination ,are bored easily and cant dream about didiley! ....birth control pills also made life less stressful also
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Old 05-31-2010, 11:12 AM
 
28,293 posts, read 40,003,897 times
Reputation: 36825
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymoose View Post
Nothing special there. Every generation views later ones as spoiled, clueless, and self-centered. To people born before the baby boom, that's exactly how boomers look.
Ah, but you are wrong!

The Milleniums are a good bunch. My wife is seeing them enter the workforce at her office and is impressed, very impressed. They relate to people of all ages with respect, and they are intelligent and speak with less jargon then one would expect. They have an excellent work ethic and (the top of my list of "good traits") they play Pitch and Cribbage at break.

She has noticed they have a tendency to work in groups more than we did. They are into the techy gadgets, but use them wisely. The do expect instant recognition and praise for their efforts, but I think that is a trait of a lot of us have living when we do.

So, no, not all generations that follow are considered "spoiled, clueless, and self-centered".

I still think we need to come up with a "sarcasm" font. It would make communicating that feeling more obvious...
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Old 05-31-2010, 11:30 AM
 
2,024 posts, read 2,993,109 times
Reputation: 1813
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
Ah, but you are wrong!

The Milleniums are a good bunch. My wife is seeing them enter the workforce at her office and is impressed, very impressed. They relate to people of all ages with respect, and they are intelligent and speak with less jargon then one would expect. They have an excellent work ethic and (the top of my list of "good traits") they play Pitch and Cribbage at break.

She has noticed they have a tendency to work in groups more than we did. They are into the techy gadgets, but use them wisely. The do expect instant recognition and praise for their efforts, but I think that is a trait of a lot of us have living when we do.

So, no, not all generations that follow are considered "spoiled, clueless, and self-centered".

I still think we need to come up with a "sarcasm" font. It would make communicating that feeling more obvious...
That's what smilies like this are for:
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Old 05-31-2010, 08:54 PM
 
12,050 posts, read 11,178,150 times
Reputation: 10010
I'm 33. This quote by FDR provides some insight into how I feel about the Boomers: "There is a mysterious cycle in human events. To some generations much is given. Of other generations much is expected. This generation of Americans has a rendezvous with destiny."

Your generation was given much, and I look around and wonder: where's it at? I don't resent you guys. I hope you enjoyed the blessed day in the sun you got to live. I don't identify with you guys though. As a soldier, I have spent the last nine years at war. I have been away from my family about 50 percent of that time.

Both of my parents also died at an early age, leaving me with nothing but bills. No worries. It was a pleasure to pay for their funeral expenses. They were good people. My sisters and I gave them the burial respects they deserved. (Their parents paid for their own funerals and left modest inheritences... I suppose the hardships that the FDR generation endured taught them the flaws of "na na na live for today" .. or rather, they realized that those who live for today leave bills for others to pay.)

I paid for my own college education, of course. I am now saving to pay for my daughter's college education. (I don't want her to have to spend her 20s working off thousands of dollars of debt, as I did... it gives me joy to think that she won't begin life with a debt hanging over her head as I had to.)

As I save for my daughter's college education, I am also saving for my wife's parents' retirement who are now pushing 60. In true Booomer fashion, they didnt' save a dime, of course. I am currently trying to figure out how I am going to afford building an addition on to my house without sacrificing my daughter's future or my wife's. I am a little bit resentful, but I actually love my in-laws. They are good, open-hearted, sincere people. They have the childlike innocence of those who think that watching a person get shot on television brings wisdom. There is something charming about this. Besides, as my grandpa (the guy who came of age in the Depression, grew up to fight WWII and then spent his adulthood working hard with his head down to raise a family) would say: blood is blood. It makes my wife very happy to know that we will be able to keep her parents from destitude in their old age. I don't mind driving a 14-year-old car and spending months away from home to make her happy.

I also shake my head and think about the .75 on the dollar I'm going to collect in social security (if I'm lucky). I think about the pensions that were wiped out in the 70s and 80s, the unions that fell into disarray, the off-shoring of jobs due to global trade agreements, the erosion of manufacturing, etc. I wonder how a generation that showed brilliance in one area and one area only -- political activism -- could have allowed this to happen, and I just think: wow. You Boomers were given a very rich field. It's a shame you didn't tend it better. Some days, I wonder if I will ever be able to get back to where grandpa started, but I'm going to try. I suppose that's my rendezvous with destiny.

Thank you sincerely for the music. It's good. I bet my daughter (whom you bet I'm going to do everything I can to give the moon) will identify with you guys more than I do. (Brats )
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Old 06-01-2010, 06:17 AM
 
2,024 posts, read 2,993,109 times
Reputation: 1813
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestCobb View Post
I'm 33. This quote by FDR provides some insight into how I feel about the Boomers: "There is a mysterious cycle in human events. To some generations much is given. Of other generations much is expected. This generation of Americans has a rendezvous with destiny."

Your generation was given much, and I look around and wonder: where's it at? I don't resent you guys. I hope you enjoyed the blessed day in the sun you got to live. I don't identify with you guys though. As a soldier, I have spent the last nine years at war. I have been away from my family about 50 percent of that time.

Both of my parents also died at an early age, leaving me with nothing but bills. No worries. It was a pleasure to pay for their funeral expenses. They were good people. My sisters and I gave them the burial respects they deserved. (Their parents paid for their own funerals and left modest inheritences... I suppose the hardships that the FDR generation endured taught them the flaws of "na na na live for today" .. or rather, they realized that those who live for today leave bills for others to pay.)

I paid for my own college education, of course. I am now saving to pay for my daughter's college education. (I don't want her to have to spend her 20s working off thousands of dollars of debt, as I did... it gives me joy to think that she won't begin life with a debt hanging over her head as I had to.)

As I save for my daughter's college education, I am also saving for my wife's parents' retirement who are now pushing 60. In true Booomer fashion, they didnt' save a dime, of course. I am currently trying to figure out how I am going to afford building an addition on to my house without sacrificing my daughter's future or my wife's. I am a little bit resentful, but I actually love my in-laws. They are good, open-hearted, sincere people. They have the childlike innocence of those who think that watching a person get shot on television brings wisdom. There is something charming about this. Besides, as my grandpa (the guy who came of age in the Depression, grew up to fight WWII and then spent his adulthood working hard with his head down to raise a family) would say: blood is blood. It makes my wife very happy to know that we will be able to keep her parents from destitude in their old age. I don't mind driving a 14-year-old car and spending months away from home to make her happy.

I also shake my head and think about the .75 on the dollar I'm going to collect in social security (if I'm lucky). I think about the pensions that were wiped out in the 70s and 80s, the unions that fell into disarray, the off-shoring of jobs due to global trade agreements, the erosion of manufacturing, etc. I wonder how a generation that showed brilliance in one area and one area only -- political activism -- could have allowed this to happen, and I just think: wow. You Boomers were given a very rich field. It's a shame you didn't tend it better. Some days, I wonder if I will ever be able to get back to where grandpa started, but I'm going to try. I suppose that's my rendezvous with destiny.

Thank you sincerely for the music. It's good. I bet my daughter (whom you bet I'm going to do everything I can to give the moon) will identify with you guys more than I do. (Brats )
I applaud your efforts. But don't paint all boomers (there are tens of millions of us) with the same brush. I'm a boomer and am doing great in my early retirement. My dh invested for his retirement so we do great, travel the world and are very comfortable. I'm putting money into my granddaugters college fund.
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Old 06-01-2010, 10:26 AM
 
12,050 posts, read 11,178,150 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yankinscotland View Post
I applaud your efforts. But don't paint all boomers (there are tens of millions of us) with the same brush. I'm a boomer and am doing great in my early retirement. My dh invested for his retirement so we do great, travel the world and are very comfortable. I'm putting money into my granddaugters college fund.
Yank, I realize I was painting with a broad brush. Good for you.
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Old 06-03-2010, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,486 posts, read 43,916,689 times
Reputation: 47268
There are boomers and then there are boomers. I was born in 46---I have a step daughter born in 64. It's very difficult to think we are remotely grouped in the same "generation". We both have had such differing experiences in life. I witnesed the women's rights movement, civil rights, space travel, birth control, etc. These were not available to my group yet her group and younger seem to take these things for granted and why not---they have never been without.
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Old 06-03-2010, 01:28 PM
 
2,024 posts, read 2,993,109 times
Reputation: 1813
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
There are boomers and then there are boomers. I was born in 46---I have a step daughter born in 64. It's very difficult to think we are remotely grouped in the same "generation". We both have had such differing experiences in life. I witnesed the women's rights movement, civil rights, space travel, birth control, etc. These were not available to my group yet her group and younger seem to take these things for granted and why not---they have never been without.
I don't really see how they can group people born in the 1960's as post war baby boomers. I think up to 10 years after the war ended would make one a post war baby.
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Old 06-03-2010, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,486 posts, read 43,916,689 times
Reputation: 47268
You'd think so but everywhere I read says baby boomers start in 46 and go to 64. Too broad a range I think.
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Old 06-03-2010, 03:25 PM
 
2,024 posts, read 2,993,109 times
Reputation: 1813
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
You'd think so but everywhere I read says baby boomers start in 46 and go to 64. Too broad a range I think.
Those are the official years, yes. I agree, just too broad.
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