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Old 09-18-2007, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Western North Carolina
4,949 posts, read 7,880,542 times
Reputation: 10420

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I often have to wonder if there is money exchanging hands to get certain areas on these "lists". Obviously, the more a place shows up on lists of "best" places, the more that area's developers and realtors stand to gain, right?! Just something to think about. It also seems like the same places keep showing up over and over again on these "lists". I had to drive through Asheville several times after vacationing in the mountains when I lived in Western North Carolina. Asheville traffic is so congested, and the sprawl is awful! I can't imagine who would want to live there! Yet you would think it was some kind of "Shangri-la" according to some of these articles. Just goes to show, you really do have to visit a place in person and REALLY check it out (local newspapers are a great help. If I had just read the local newspaper for a place I visited last year, I never would have wasted my time even going there. The real thing was NOTHING like I had in my mind, despite my thorough research on-line. Remember that those glossy Chamber of Commerce brochures are nothing but ADVERTISING). It also seems everyone rushes to these same places, and then complains about how built-up and crowded it's getting (like North Carolina)! Maybe the real "best" places are the ones not everyone and their brother is heading for! Sometimes, maybe it really does pay off to think outside the box and look for someplace that is not so "discovered", and marketed to the hilt. This is a huge country, surely there has to be many, many great places to live and/or retire.
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Old 09-18-2007, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,764 posts, read 16,877,837 times
Reputation: 9324
montanamom wrote:
I often have to wonder if there is money exchanging hands to get certain areas on these "lists".
Personally, when I look at the lists, I automatically ASSUME that money is exchanging hands, and anyone who doesn't is IMO somewhat of a fool. 'Like you said, those glossy Chamber of Commerce brochures are nothing but ADVERTISING'. The best places are indeed those places not yet discovered. My new hometown of Grand Junction, CO is a great example of that.

blessings....Franco
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Old 09-19-2007, 05:12 AM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
5,288 posts, read 17,960,936 times
Reputation: 6544
I agree about money changing hands....someone here posted on this thread that San Francisco was on a top 10 list for seniors to retire to - San Francisco has in the past been listed as the most expensive city in the U.S. - the traffic and crime are unbelievably high....you would have to be a very wealthy senior indeed to be able to live in San Francisco......and if you like sunshine, SF is one of the worst places to live - many seniors have arthritis and are on a limited income - so who in the world comes up with a list that says San Francisco is a great place to retire? Boggles the mind.
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Old 09-19-2007, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,888 posts, read 25,327,549 times
Reputation: 26385
I think publications buy articles to have on file. When they have space, they publish. The influx of large numbers of people will change an area fast. 7 or 8 years ago Asheville used to be the delightful middle size town they described.

I agree with all the people who said it's what's on YOUR list that counts. You are the one who has to live there. I am the oddball here. I picked Las Vegas. The housing is high but food is cheap and there's always something to do. There are lots of jobs. There's a real international airport. Great weather. All your relatives will come visit because everyone wants to go to Vegas. I lived in cold rural areas for years and now I want to live somewhere fun where I don't have to shovel, rake, or mow! The more urban, the better.

I loved hearing everyone else's choices. We tried really hard to find someplace better than Vegas but never could.
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Old 09-19-2007, 10:28 AM
 
Location: on an island
13,382 posts, read 40,922,343 times
Reputation: 13245
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewAgeRedneck View Post

BTW, Fruita is growing even faster than Grand Junction, so apparently you are not the only person who prefers Fruita. However, Fruita has some serious growth problems that it has to deal with...AND...most of the jobs for Fruita residents are located in Grand Junction. We seriously considered Fruita, but didn't want the hassle of driving to and from work 5 days a week. Instead convenience won out and we bought a home in Grand Junction. Thus far, we are very happy that we did.
It boggles my mind that Grand Junction, let alone Fruita is even "on the map" of someone's consciousness, let alone on a messageboard.
I remember when these were just cute little towns on the Western Slope.
I think Colorado has become a very popular place for retirement.
I certainly can see retiring there over some place like Chicago (but then I can't stand winter.)
San Antonio has always intrigued me and I would like to visit there some day, but so far we are very happy where we are now.
The Places Rated books are good for helping a person decide what his criteria should be, the only trouble is that things are changing so fast that it is hard to keep up with the details.
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Old 09-20-2007, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Lovelock, NV - Anchorage, AK
1,195 posts, read 4,994,187 times
Reputation: 465
I was surprised to see the most if not all of the cities on the list were large cities. I'm retiring in Northern Nevada the closest town has 2003 population, we are looking for a slower pace not the fast pace of a city.
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Old 09-20-2007, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Earth Wanderer, longing for the stars.
12,408 posts, read 16,481,392 times
Reputation: 8777
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tressa View Post
I was surprised to see the most if not all of the cities on the list were large cities. I'm retiring in Northern Nevada the closest town has 2003 population, we are looking for a slower pace not the fast pace of a city.
I thought I would like a small town. Then I retired and realized that all the activity of work and people was appealing to me, just not the deadlines and stress. I also needed an operation and decided that I wanted to retire near a teaching hospital where they had modern methods and equipment. On top of that, we started taking senior classes at a local community college and met some nice people.

To top it all off, we got a good deal on an apartment with lease in Seattle. So, a year from now, that's where we will be heading.

Where we are now, we can go out for walks at night, but there is nowhere to go to. I imagine a city is not so safe at night, but has lots of activities, so everything is a tradeoff.

There are books about the best small and midsized cities to retire to. They are probably in Amazon.
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Old 09-21-2007, 12:34 PM
 
Location: Lovelock, NV - Anchorage, AK
1,195 posts, read 4,994,187 times
Reputation: 465
I understand what your saying about the city and the activities they have to offer, my husband and I have always lived in the city but had a bit of property to our place that type of life in a big city is mostly unapproachable. We purchased 5 acres of raw land so we will be busy with a task that we have always dreamed of.
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Old 09-21-2007, 07:02 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, LA
1,730 posts, read 3,141,238 times
Reputation: 2955
Quote:
Originally Posted by montanamom View Post
I often have to wonder if there is money exchanging hands to get certain areas on these "lists". Obviously, the more a place shows up on lists of "best" places, the more that area's developers and realtors stand to gain, right?! Just something to think about. It also seems like the same places keep showing up over and over again on these "lists". I had to drive through Asheville several times after vacationing in the mountains when I lived in Western North Carolina. Asheville traffic is so congested, and the sprawl is awful! I can't imagine who would want to live there! Yet you would think it was some kind of "Shangri-la" according to some of these articles. Just goes to show, you really do have to visit a place in person and REALLY check it out (local newspapers are a great help. If I had just read the local newspaper for a place I visited last year, I never would have wasted my time even going there. The real thing was NOTHING like I had in my mind, despite my thorough research on-line. Remember that those glossy Chamber of Commerce brochures are nothing but ADVERTISING). It also seems everyone rushes to these same places, and then complains about how built-up and crowded it's getting (like North Carolina)! Maybe the real "best" places are the ones not everyone and their brother is heading for! Sometimes, maybe it really does pay off to think outside the box and look for someplace that is not so "discovered", and marketed to the hilt. This is a huge country, surely there has to be many, many great places to live and/or retire.
You may be right about the money changing hands! But then again, I also wonder if it might be just that people have REALLY different ideas about what a good town for retirement should be like. A few years ago, a friend at work was listening to my description of the perfect retirement town, and he proceeded to tell me how absolutely wonderful Asheville was and how it would be the perfect place for me. He had spent some time there and knew the area. I read about it online, enough to realize that is it not at all what I am looking for!! Ewww! And he was a real person just trying to help me. He was from the Northeast, so possibly he feels more at home in crowded regions.
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Old 09-22-2007, 08:52 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
14,330 posts, read 19,545,592 times
Reputation: 18436
Pittsburgh is the only eastern city to make this list. What makes this city such a good place to retire in? With all the cities and small towns in teh east, certainly there are better places to retire to in that region.
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