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Old 01-05-2010, 11:25 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,895 posts, read 25,347,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
From some posts in other threads this can also be a problem in active 55 communities when the oldest residents don't want to make capital improvements or increase assessments to build up reserves for future needs.
Very true but no one will live for ever and the pendulum will swing the other way.
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Old 01-06-2010, 03:05 AM
 
12,746 posts, read 14,101,964 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
...
I have adequate experience of how it felt to be run out by transplants coming to Colorado and Washington State (during my working yrs). We lost our wage ranking b'cuz the company felt more loyal to the transplants and allowed them to keep wages far in excess of local, thus the locals had to drop in ranking to achieve even 'distribution'. Eventually we had to sell properties and farms due to taxes and encroachments, schools became more liberal, county gov and policy was infiltrated and costs went from $250 to $25,000 for permitting and plan reviews. Library picked up subscriptions to porn, Accidents increased from cell phone talking soccer moms who didn't realize SUV's don't stop quickly in rain and snow. (I had 2 cars totaled in rear-end 'chain reaction' collisions). Good business for body shops and physical therapists.
None of these problems seem specifically related to retirees, which is what the OP asked about. These seem to be problems related to an influx of working people into your area.
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Old 01-06-2010, 03:39 AM
 
Location: NH Lakes Region
351 posts, read 1,418,420 times
Reputation: 442
Default Eventual transplant

I'm working at being one of the transplants. If all goes well, I'll be retiring in about six years, and several years ago I was fortunate enough to find the house and area where I wanted to retire. (Yep, it was the peak of the bubble, so I took a pretty large hit, as I found out when I refinanced, but I have no regrets.) I bought the house and every chance I get, I spend time there (not that often, unfortunately), but I've got an eye to my future. If at all possible, I get home for the town meetings at budget/election time, keep up on events with the local paper, have work done on the house using local contractors as much as possible (am getting a pretty good idea of which ones to avoid like the plague), have at least a nodding acquaintance with some of my neighbors, and have gradually added some charitable contributions to benefit organizations and people a bit closer to home.

I have realized that my perspective on what I want in a community is a bit different than a lot of the current full-time residents, and I try to take that into account when I vote, but at some point I do diverge from some local priorities. (Have you even been the only "nay" vote at a town hall meeting? THAT can be fun.) As someone that has no children, schools are not my highest priority, but I do recognize that they are necessary - unfortunately, I don't always believe money is the answer. (I have several friends that are/have been teachers, and the insiders' view of the school system can be a real eye opener). It has been very educational to see the development/workings of the community over time, though.

In short, I'm trying to become part of the community I chose to join without trying to grab the steering wheel and change the direction - which is not to say I have any problems with reading a road map and letting them know when I think a turn might be coming soon. I'm looking forward to spending ALL my time there, I have to say, and planning fairly far out is allowing me to know what to expect when I get there, as well as take part in what the community will look like by then.

I'm also interested to hear what other transplants (and potential transplants) are experiencing. Good thread, by the way.
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Old 01-06-2010, 05:55 AM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,999,418 times
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I'd say teh loacls benefit well from the income that it bring in to their community.its like having a company that brings better paying jobs to your community and more of them. Wealth spreads its effcts in a communtiy has the money is spent; bring business and jobs that were not there before.Rememebr that many of these are moving from areas where the real harm was government spending beyond waht the tax base actaully supported to areas where the governamnt is balancing their budget to income more.That inflated spending has done more harm than anything just like those who have relied on credit cards for income.
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Old 01-06-2010, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,697 posts, read 49,488,800 times
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We transplanted to a new area; and we are largely blending in with the locals.

I just think that so long as your pension can support you where you go; than you will be fine.
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Old 01-06-2010, 07:46 AM
 
29,809 posts, read 34,894,042 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
Very true but no one will live for ever and the pendulum will swing the other way.
Yes but by that time the younger residents will now be the older residents tooting the horn they use to reject perhaps.
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Old 01-06-2010, 07:48 AM
 
29,809 posts, read 34,894,042 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
We transplanted to a new area; and we are largely blending in with the locals.

I just think that so long as your pension can support you where you go; than you will be fine.
What if your and the income of other transplants exceeds by a good margin that of the locals? Will there be resentment?
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Old 01-06-2010, 07:53 AM
 
29,809 posts, read 34,894,042 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
None of these problems seem specifically related to retirees, which is what the OP asked about. These seem to be problems related to an influx of working people into your area.
Within the context of my OP. We as retirees have a considerable impact real and psychological on our neighbors of all age ranges. New development with younger couples putting 3/ 1/2 to maybe 20% or more down. Retiree from high income area pays cash for their house. We talk about the wisdom of paying cash and being mortgage free in other threads but what about the reaction of our neighbors who are working a mortgage and worried about job security and we have any combination of pensions, social security and considerable investments. Not all do but many do. Also when you are downsizing in size or value of home you are doing the fiscally responsible thing while your neighbors may be stretching. Many retiree's are in the drivers seat of life. Even in active 55 communities in some areas you have the working residents trying to keep up and the retired residents some of whom are on easy street and might be the same age.
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Old 01-06-2010, 08:08 AM
 
6,309 posts, read 4,755,565 times
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Many retirees are not "in the drivers seat of life." In fact statistics indicate that the vast majority of retirees have not saved enough to maintain their usual standard of living. Inflation and healthcare costs are big uncertainties that should worry all of us.
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Old 01-06-2010, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Central Fl
2,903 posts, read 10,956,136 times
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TuborgP,

In my opinion, the answer is no. I base that only on my experience in buying a home in a nice 55+ golf community in Florida. I do not live there full time yet, and am still working. I plan on relocating there in a couple of years.

I find much less "I have more then you" thinking down there. People who moved there usually did because they worked hard, invested well, and are enjoying life. I have found no snobbyness at all in my neighborhood. I know there are some whose finances are limited, others who have more then they could ever spend. It never comes up. It is never showed.

I think it is because at our point in life, we have nothing to PROVE. The die has been cast, we worked, we lived, and now we can enjoy this next phase of our lives. Who really cares if a neighbor has tons in the bank.....as long as folks can live in a self satisfyingly way it does not matter. What matters more now is health, etc.....

We love our neighbors, and they care for us. We help each other, (as much as I can now that I'm only there a few months a year). Up here in NY, I'm "old"...(i'm 51) Down there I'm the "kid" on the block that can still climb ladders and do stuff. That is probably envied more then anything.

I have one neighbor who I know is quite well off. He no longer drives well, and cannot drive at night. Last time I was down there, I took him out at night for ice cream. He was like a kid on Christmas. It has been years since he sat on the passenger side and just got to relax and enjoy the sights. It was years since he saw the area at night. That meant more to him then any amount of money.

When it comes to neighborhood activities, we make sure it is affordable to everyone in the neighborhood, knowing that the best times are when all are having a good time without worries.

sorry for the long post.

Frank
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