U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-06-2010, 08:49 AM
 
29,884 posts, read 34,936,573 times
Reputation: 11793

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Many retirees are not "in the drivers seat of life." In fact statistics indicate that the vast majority of retirees have not saved enough to maintain their usual standard of living. Inflation and healthcare costs are big uncertainties that should worry all of us.
That doesn't alter the reality for those of us who are. The reality of many is that for whatever reason they have a very solid foundation under them and are still managing to invest in retirement. Their wealth is increasing not decreasing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-06-2010, 08:50 AM
 
29,884 posts, read 34,936,573 times
Reputation: 11793
Quote:
Originally Posted by faithfulFrank View Post
TuborgP,

In my opinion, the answer is no. I base that only on my experience in buying a home in a nice 55+ golf community in Florida. I do not live there full time yet, and am still working. I plan on relocating there in a couple of years.

I find much less "I have more then you" thinking down there. People who moved there usually did because they worked hard, invested well, and are enjoying life. I have found no snobbyness at all in my neighborhood. I know there are some whose finances are limited, others who have more then they could ever spend. It never comes up. It is never showed.

I think it is because at our point in life, we have nothing to PROVE. The die has been cast, we worked, we lived, and now we can enjoy this next phase of our lives. Who really cares if a neighbor has tons in the bank.....as long as folks can live in a self satisfyingly way it does not matter. What matters more now is health, etc.....

We love our neighbors, and they care for us. We help each other, (as much as I can now that I'm only there a few months a year). Up here in NY, I'm "old"...(i'm 51) Down there I'm the "kid" on the block that can still climb ladders and do stuff. That is probably envied more then anything.

I have one neighbor who I know is quite well off. He no longer drives well, and cannot drive at night. Last time I was down there, I took him out at night for ice cream. He was like a kid on Christmas. It has been years since he sat on the passenger side and just got to relax and enjoy the sights. It was years since he saw the area at night. That meant more to him then any amount of money.

When it comes to neighborhood activities, we make sure it is affordable to everyone in the neighborhood, knowing that the best times are when all are having a good time without worries.

sorry for the long post.

Frank
Don't be sorry a very good post!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-06-2010, 08:55 AM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,922,040 times
Reputation: 23222
Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
What if your and the income of other transplants exceeds by a good margin that of the locals? Will there be resentment?
Only if you act like you think that income makes you better than them. Stores in the area will love you!

For those who vote against better schools, you should know that a good school is one of the best stablizing forces to keep the neighborhood high end and assure property values stay up. Might want to change your vote. I have never regretted spending money on educating children. That would be a good place to volunteer too. I personally would never want to live in a neighborhood of 55+. Our neighborhood is changing into that on its own, but I love to see the young people down the block walking the dog and riding a bike. Keeps you young.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-06-2010, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,732 posts, read 49,546,472 times
Reputation: 19166
Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
What if your and the income of other transplants exceeds by a good margin that of the locals? Will there be resentment?
I do not know.

My pension combined with my Dw's p/t income together pretty much equal the median household income in this area.

Effectively two adults both working full-time flipping burgers, seems to be the median household income.

So we fit right in.

This was a concern for us, before I retired. I did not want to go to any area where the median income was far above our income.

As for someone with a pension, say four times greater than minimum-wage, who would they 'fit in'? I do not know.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-06-2010, 09:44 AM
 
Location: DC Area, for now
3,517 posts, read 12,065,149 times
Reputation: 2141
Maybe its my age but I was taught that it is rude to ask & discuss one's wealth. Where I am now & where I'll move to, my neighbors will not know what my income and savings is.

I care peripherially about schools because it matters to what sort of society I live in. Money isn't necessarily the only answer (DC schools are a glaring ex.).

The demographics of an area affect how it is to live in it. But moving retirees are a small fraction of all retirees in most areas. Therefore, I don't think it will a big factor. The. Baby boom bubble overall will have a bigger effect. How one behaves in one's community will affect more how one is received
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-06-2010, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,722 posts, read 33,754,671 times
Reputation: 51993
Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
I think a lot of what we discuss involves the benefits of relocating for retirement and the drawbacks of becoming a transplant. Also as transplants we often impact the economy of our new location and can drive up living costs. If we come from a high cost of living area our investments can be greater as our salaries were usually higher in those areas. Also if you have a pension that pension along with the SS based on your higher income will be the same wherever you live. Thus your SS is higher than a comparable person who you might be living next door to who did the very same type of work you did etc. How does it feel to be the transplant? How does it feel to be the native who sees the changes both good and bad? Thoughts?
I have a pension. I live the exact same way I did when I was working. I rent and I don't have flashy stuff, do flashy things or go to flashy places. That's because I'm a boring nerd, not because I'm frugal. I have a car that's comfortable and not the kind thieves want to steal. I didn't sell a house to move in retirement so I didn't buy bigger in a cheaper place. It's not because I can't afford it. I don't want to be bothered with taking care of a house. I don't like to fly so I don't travel except for long car trips. I never wore jewelry and I still don't. My hobbies, other than my initial equipment purchase, don't cost me any money at all to do (except for gasoline) or they cost very little and I don't have to get dressed up to do the things I like to do. The natives I come in contact with would never look at me or talk to me and think I might have more money than they do. I like being around the natives and prefer their events to the type that attract transplants. Only my accent gives me away.

My biggest complaint about some transplant retirees is that many look for better weather and cheaper places to live without considering why the places they move to are cheaper than the places they left. They want the same stuff and the same laws and regulations they had in the places they came from and seem to be less concerned with embracing a new culture in favor of bringing the old one with them to the new place so they try to change the new place to make it more like the old one. When are we getting a this, when are we getting a that...waaah, waaah waaah! They never think that if the old place was so great, they'd still be living there.

Some settle among conclaves of other transplants. If they overwhelm a smaller town because they are wooed by developers and settle in big master planned communities, it's infuriating because they change the voting patterns of the small town by their sheer numbers and the natives wind up being taxed more.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-06-2010, 02:33 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,093 posts, read 13,257,642 times
Reputation: 14870
Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
We transplanted to a new area; and we are largely blending in with the locals.

I just think that so long as your pension can support you where you go; than you will be fine.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
What if your and the income of other transplants exceeds by a good margin that of the locals? Will there be resentment?
I don't think exceeding the local income norm matters.
Spending that income does.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-06-2010, 03:05 PM
 
29,884 posts, read 34,936,573 times
Reputation: 11793
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gandalara View Post
I don't think exceeding the local income norm matters.
Spending that income does.
What do think are the outcomes of spending that income?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-06-2010, 08:52 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,566,440 times
Reputation: 6928
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
I have a pension. I live the exact same way I did when I was working. I rent and I don't have flashy stuff, do flashy things or go to flashy places. That's because I'm a boring nerd, not because I'm frugal. I have a car that's comfortable and not the kind thieves want to steal. I didn't sell a house to move in retirement so I didn't buy bigger in a cheaper place. It's not because I can't afford it. I don't want to be bothered with taking care of a house. I don't like to fly so I don't travel except for long car trips. I never wore jewelry and I still don't. My hobbies, other than my initial equipment purchase, don't cost me any money at all to do (except for gasoline) or they cost very little and I don't have to get dressed up to do the things I like to do. The natives I come in contact with would never look at me or talk to me and think I might have more money than they do. I like being around the natives and prefer their events to the type that attract transplants. Only my accent gives me away.

My biggest complaint about some transplant retirees is that many look for better weather and cheaper places to live without considering why the places they move to are cheaper than the places they left. They want the same stuff and the same laws and regulations they had in the places they came from and seem to be less concerned with embracing a new culture in favor of bringing the old one with them to the new place so they try to change the new place to make it more like the old one. When are we getting a this, when are we getting a that...waaah, waaah waaah! They never think that if the old place was so great, they'd still be living there.

Some settle among conclaves of other transplants. If they overwhelm a smaller town because they are wooed by developers and settle in big master planned communities, it's infuriating because they change the voting patterns of the small town by their sheer numbers and the natives wind up being taxed more.
This is one of the best post, I have ever read on this forum. It gives such simple good advice for enjoying your life.

I have lived in the Denver area for 31 years. I am originally a New Yorker. When, I moved here, many transplants were moving to Boulder and certain newer planned communities. I intentionally looked around for a town, near Denver, that was populated by more natives and long term residents. I did not want to be around other new transplants---I wanted to be a part of a regular community with normal activities and a lifestyle that reflected more of my new home.

I discovered that there were many lesser known towns and cities around Denver that were not as well known as Boulder. I live in Arvada, the northwest suburbs. It has many of the advantages of living in Colorado and has all the access to the vast outdoors, trails and parks. It is extremely convenient to go to Denver. Also, it is down the road from Boulder and has a peace and tranquility that Boulder lacks. It much cheaper; It is less crowded and it has regularity of life that is not influenced by transplants. Yet, I can get to Boulder, quickly, for what value it offers. The same can be said for Wheat Ridge, Edgewater, Lakewood and many other lesser known enclaves. Yet, on the Colorado forum I seen many newcomers wanting to be in all the other tonier, wealthier, enclosed newer communities and glitzy places of new city neighborhoods. Many of them do not want to experience a new locale; they want to it to be the same, always the same, from one place to another.

I think many areas of the country have the same cities that are near the big draws of populations but are not as well known. These cities can offer you many of the same amenities but maybe not the bragging rights of the "in place to live".

Now after so many years in Colorado, I consider myself a local. I live a simple life with simple pleasures and fit into my community.

Livecontent

Last edited by livecontent; 01-06-2010 at 09:06 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-06-2010, 10:31 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,722 posts, read 33,754,671 times
Reputation: 51993
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
Some settle among conclaves of other transplants. .
I, uh, meant enclaves.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top