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Old 01-05-2010, 06:51 AM
 
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I think a lot of what we discuss involves the benefits of relocating for retirement and the drawbacks of becoming a transplant. Also as transplants we often impact the economy of our new location and can drive up living costs. If we come from a high cost of living area our investments can be greater as our salaries were usually higher in those areas. Also if you have a pension that pension along with the SS based on your higher income will be the same wherever you live. Thus your SS is higher than a comparable person who you might be living next door to who did the very same type of work you did etc. How does it feel to be the transplant? How does it feel to be the native who sees the changes both good and bad? Thoughts?
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Old 01-05-2010, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Sierra Vista, AZ
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Sort of depends, some developments are entirely transplants, if they are gated they don't mix with the locals. I always get a kick of the locals who make a fortune selling overpriced real estate to outsiders and then are shocked to find themselves outnumbered and out of power.
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Old 01-05-2010, 10:11 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boompa View Post
Sort of depends, some developments are entirely transplants, if they are gated they don't mix with the locals. I always get a kick of the locals who make a fortune selling overpriced real estate to outsiders and then are shocked to find themselves outnumbered and out of power.
Yeah especially the construction workers who profited from the work but resent some of the outcomes. There is also the culture shock that some transplants bring to the area.
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Old 01-05-2010, 11:25 AM
 
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If I stay where I am now living, I will retire with an income that is less than half of my current income. Another option would be for me to continue to work. I figure if I work until about age 71, then I would be at a 70-80% retirement income. Partly I save more and my investments grow, but also I just get a lot closer to death. Moving means that I can cash out my house, downsize and if I move to a more average cost area, then I will be able to maintain a reasonable standard of living.

How does it feel? Well, it is not going to be easy to uproot and move, but it is necessary. I am trying to make the best of it by picking a part of the country which is more appealing, with plenty of activities and better weather. I also feel that I have paid the price and deserve a decent retirement. I live and work in a high stress area, commute 2 hours a day and work 10 hours. I've had enough. I have also had enough taxes which is one of the major reasons that has made it difficult to accrue a decent retirement nest egg.
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Old 01-05-2010, 12:39 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
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I would say at some point it becomes a 'If you can't beat them, join them' scenario on each end. From my recent quest it becomes obvious that some areas adapt better, and you will recognize that by the growth and recommendations from 'senior' immigrants. More accepting towns often are university / mixed age / economic based.

Areas that struggle significantly are highly ethnic or religious strongholds. As I traversed the "Hill country" of TX I was told by natives to avoid certain towns that had strongholds, as immigrants are tolerated but not welcomed. There were some towns that were welcoming and were highly diversified and supportive of the growth. This has been similar in locations I have noted in NM, AZ, CO, WY, MT, ID OR, WA.

I have adequate experience of how it felt to be run out by transplants coming to Colorado and Washington State (during my working yrs). We lost our wage ranking b'cuz the company felt more loyal to the transplants and allowed them to keep wages far in excess of local, thus the locals had to drop in ranking to achieve even 'distribution'. Eventually we had to sell properties and farms due to taxes and encroachments, schools became more liberal, county gov and policy was infiltrated and costs went from $250 to $25,000 for permitting and plan reviews. Library picked up subscriptions to porn, Accidents increased from cell phone talking soccer moms who didn't realize SUV's don't stop quickly in rain and snow. (I had 2 cars totaled in rear-end 'chain reaction' collisions). Good business for body shops and physical therapists.

I'm sure it is similar as the new senior transplant residents come to power (political and purchasing). I will say that it can really destroy an AG centric community, as their very living depends highly on a low cost structure and boutiques don't cut it.
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Old 01-05-2010, 01:01 PM
 
29,764 posts, read 34,848,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
I would say at some point it becomes a 'If you can't beat them, join them' scenario on each end. From my recent quest it becomes obvious that some areas adapt better, and you will recognize that by the growth and recommendations from 'senior' immigrants. More accepting towns often are university / mixed age / economic based.

Areas that struggle significantly are highly ethnic or religious strongholds. As I traversed the "Hill country" of TX I was told by natives to avoid certain towns that had strongholds, as immigrants are tolerated but not welcomed. There were some towns that were welcoming and were highly diversified and supportive of the growth. This has been similar in locations I have noted in NM, AZ, CO, WY, MT, ID OR, WA.

I have adequate experience of how it felt to be run out by transplants coming to Colorado and Washington State (during my working yrs). We lost our wage ranking b'cuz the company felt more loyal to the transplants and allowed them to keep wages far in excess of local, thus the locals had to drop in ranking to achieve even 'distribution'. Eventually we had to sell properties and farms due to taxes and encroachments, schools became more liberal, county gov and policy was infiltrated and costs went from $250 to $25,000 for permitting and plan reviews. Library picked up subscriptions to porn, Accidents increased from cell phone talking soccer moms who didn't realize SUV's don't stop quickly in rain and snow. (I had 2 cars totaled in rear-end 'chain reaction' collisions). Good business for body shops and physical therapists.

I'm sure it is similar as the new senior transplant residents come to power (political and purchasing). I will say that it can really destroy an AG centric community, as their very living depends highly on a low cost structure and boutiques don't cut it.
Excellent post and just what I was hoping this thread would bring to the table. Ethnic diversity also becomes a part of what you are bringing to the discussion.
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Old 01-05-2010, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
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I relocated from MN, bad weather and high taxes, to NV, lower taxes and good weather. I'm glad I moved and I'm having a ball. Lots of people come here to retire and it does have a huge effect on the local population. The retirees are interested in one thing. Keeping costs low so they won't vote to increase taxes or provide funding for schools. That is a problem for the younger population worried about educating their children. I think it will be an issue in many areas as the boomers age. And old people vote more than any other age group.....because they can.
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Old 01-05-2010, 02:37 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,527 posts, read 39,903,732 times
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Retirees can bring significant benefit to communities, I'm sure AARP is tooting that horn, but if someone coughs up quantitative data I would like to use it in my senior cooperative (shared equity housing) presentations.

In one town I visited last month, I talked with city planners, assessor, economic development, senior and low income service providers, edu officials, library, and medical services. They were all in unanimous praise for the high quality and collaboration of senior volunteers. They also cried about how the tax levies and subsequent infrastructure was gonna fail .
My reply was consistent... "Then I guess you better sharpen your pencils and determine how to effective and profitably use your excellent 'retiree volunteer corp'. What do retirees want for infrastructure and what are they willing to DO / pay for?". After all I don't feel we are free-loaders or don't realize cost structures.

There is no reason gov spending and programs should continue on status quo. Adapt to the needs, use wisdom (senior ) in spending and be creative in financing. (worked for the banks! ). I can't imagine that there are not vast resources in a retirement community for 'job-sharing', volunteer expertise in management and accounting, technical expertise, tutors and teachers, laborers and gardeners... I would not doubt that a good % of cost burdensome public infrastructure could be ELIMINATED and improved.
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Old 01-05-2010, 02:37 PM
 
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School property taxes are one of the big factors that contributes to a high cost of living in my area. The property tax increases always get approved. If they fail on the first voting round, another election is scheduled and the school administration threatens the end of after school programs, etc. At this point the costs are just totally out of hand. Administrators and political appointees are making huge incomes. The scandals appear frequently in the local newspaper but that seems to have no effect.
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Old 01-05-2010, 02:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
I relocated from MN, bad weather and high taxes, to NV, lower taxes and good weather. I'm glad I moved and I'm having a ball. Lots of people come here to retire and it does have a huge effect on the local population. The retirees are interested in one thing. Keeping costs low so they won't vote to increase taxes or provide funding for schools. That is a problem for the younger population worried about educating their children. I think it will be an issue in many areas as the boomers age. And old people vote more than any other age group.....because they can.
From some posts in other threads this can also be a problem in active 55 communities when the oldest residents don't want to make capital improvements or increase assessments to build up reserves for future needs.
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