U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-15-2010, 10:40 PM
 
Location: Arizona
419 posts, read 658,453 times
Reputation: 862

Advertisements

[quote=triciajeanne;12913745]


There are several sites (non-profits/not things like roomate.com) in various locations that work with matching seniors with people looking for such an arrangement. I'd read various anecdotal stories on results and it sounds like there are many situations that have worked.

Wow! I had forgotten about that concept. I think it was the early 80's ,there was an article in the Phoenix newspaper, which included interviews with 2 elderly women and their roomates who had found each other through the program. They were very happy and grateful they had found each other. At that time, I thought what a great concept. After that one article, I never heard anymore about it. So, I have no idea if it caught on and is still around.

One program that independent low income seniors and handicapped people benefit from is income qualifying subsidized housing. There are apartment buildings for just that purpose. Unfortunately, there are too few of them in Phoenix. In 2000 there was a 2 year waiting list. I don't know the situation today. Pittsburgh is one place to be if you are elderly and need assistance. Many high rises in the City and surrounding areas have been turned into senior subsidized housing. You, as a single person will qualify for assistance if your income is no more than $21,000 a year, including SS. (this figure is from 2009). As always, if interested, check it out for yourself. So, you do not have to be destitute to get help. Don't know if there are enough units to go around, but I never saw any press reporting there was a problem. In addition, most of the lottery revenues go to the benefit of seniors.

If you do not need assistance, never consider buying a house in Pittsburgh. The property taxes are outrageous. They do give a break to seniors but it is so small you wouldn't notice. Rents are also high , unless you like dodging bullets. If , you want to train to run a marathon, you will enjoy all of the steps and stairs you will have to climb in most of the houses. Not my idea of a comfortable existence when you pull into your garage and have to carry your groceries up a flight of stairs.

Sorry to go off topic, but wanted to point out the area is not so good unless you are in need and qualify for of senior services. They do take care of their lower income seniors.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-16-2010, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,991,724 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by triciajeanne View Post
Ah, see this is the creative part of how to utlitize our existing situations! Good thinking, New England.

You would need to check with the local zoning people about this if you are actually going to create a separate house. Many localities are not real positive on this/it is something that needs to changed but is often rejected in single family home neighborhoods. Hopefully that is not the case.

If you are simply talking about a mini kitchen without the necessity to pull building permits and the like, I would think you could do this fairly easily without involving the local government. Again, it is a question of the strictness of the code where you live.

In another life (really this life but it seems like another life now), I had a kitchenette on each floor/the large family kitchen was on the main floor/the master suite had a kitchenette in the sitting area and the third floor had a full kitchen. It worked beautifully for us and provided temporary housing for many people over the years. Maybe that is why the whole concept of house-sharing doesn't seem so weird to me - I did it so many times and actually it was fun. We were very blessed with some delightful people and in fact one young lady ended up getting married at the house and I did the catering for the wedding. Ahhh, should have been a movie.

It is a wonderful way if you can do it to preserve your ability to stay and age in place where you are. It also can provide a housemate with whom you can develop a relationship for those needs you might have in the future or viceversa and could be a part of reducing the cost of their rental.

That's what can work so well with all of this - those who own houses and either need some way to reduce their expenses and/or wish to build more community for future needs have the advantage of sharing the household they have. For those out of the housing market who are in need of housing, renting - sharing in the costs of someone else's home - can provide them with reduced costs and the same inter-dependency that can arise from the situation.

There are several sites (non-profits/not things like roomate.com) in various locations that work with matching seniors with people looking for such an arrangement. I'd read various anecdotal stories on results and it sounds like there are many situations that have worked.

I am considering as I look at rentals that that is something that could work within the rental concept as well/enough people cannot afford a quality rental but can contribute to someone else's. That might well afford for me the ability to get the kind of housing I would like and also offer someone a better situation than they might be able to anticipate. Works all around.

One additional thought - the issue of local zoning is often a real obstacle/many places do not allow "granny cottages" and the like or will only allow a related family member to reside in such an arrangement. Having been a local government wonk, I would encourage everyone here to consider getting involved as best as they can in educating your local elected officials and county/city staff on alternative housing and elder-friendly practices. As I've said before, I believe we will be the generation to lead a lot of societal change. And no, we can't burn down the administrative building (yet)TONGUE IN CHEEK!!!
I was thinking that if I could get a housemate and instead of rent charge him or her nothing in exchange for doing the things I can no longer do. I cannot make stairs anymore so that person would have the basement bathroom, and since I am unable to do as much in the way of house chores, less space for me woujld be better. I will check with my town about this. Most likely I will look at selling and renting on a first floor, but I do have a pet so I don't know how that will work. If I try to buy again, it will ahve to be in a much less expensive area and nowt that I'm reading all the sensible posts I'm leaning more toward renting.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-16-2010, 02:35 PM
 
13,323 posts, read 25,582,469 times
Reputation: 20520
A lot of rentals (esp. for 55+) allows pets under a certain size, as in cats or dogs under, say, 20 pounds. I am glad you are keeping your pet in mind. They add so much to our lives.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2010, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,991,724 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
A lot of rentals (esp. for 55+) allows pets under a certain size, as in cats or dogs under, say, 20 pounds. I am glad you are keeping your pet in mind. They add so much to our lives.
My dog is 35 lb and is necessary for my health. I would never give up a pet unless forced to. I was watching the a show on the Katrina pets last night and had the thought that all those orphaned pets should have been offered to seniors free of charge and maybe vaccinations provided, it would have cost a lost less in the long run. I do not believe that senior subsidized housing allows pets, this would be unusual.


Live Content, your poinst about high rises well taken, as usual you have a practical view of things.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2010, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,954 posts, read 7,398,977 times
Reputation: 16288
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
My dog is 35 lb and is necessary for my health. I would never give up a pet unless forced to. I was watching the a show on the Katrina pets last night and had the thought that all those orphaned pets should have been offered to seniors free of charge and maybe vaccinations provided, it would have cost a lost less in the long run. I do not believe that senior subsidized housing allows pets, this would be unusual.


Live Content, your poinst about high rises well taken, as usual you have a practical view of things.
One way for anyone to enjoy a pet and not have the expense is to be a foster for a shelter. Granted, the goal is to find a permanent home for the pet but it would give a sense of helping and most shelters pay all expenses (food, Vet, etc...) I would check the policies of the shelters. It's a great way to meet people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2010, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,698 posts, read 23,685,445 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
My dog is 35 lb and is necessary for my health. I would never give up a pet unless forced to. I was watching the a show on the Katrina pets last night and had the thought that all those orphaned pets should have been offered to seniors free of charge and maybe vaccinations provided, it would have cost a lost less in the long run. I do not believe that senior subsidized housing allows pets, this would be unusual.


Live Content, your poinst about high rises well taken, as usual you have a practical view of things.
I would still check out any subsidized housing in which you were interested. I know of some in my town that do. The pets have to be under a certain weight (varies from place to place) but they are allowed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2010, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,991,724 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN2CO View Post
One way for anyone to enjoy a pet and not have the expense is to be a foster for a shelter. Granted, the goal is to find a permanent home for the pet but it would give a sense of helping and most shelters pay all expenses (food, Vet, etc...) I would check the policies of the shelters. It's a great way to meet people.
I could never part with a dog once I had it even for a few days. I have too soft a heart and love them all too much. But, good idea!

"Solution Keeps Seniors at home" -- http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/...n2451180.shtml
Wondering if this is in every state.


"Aging in place" village http://localhealthguideonline.com/for-senior-care-sometimes-it-does-take-a-village/ (broken link)

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/14/he...g.html?_r=1&hp

Last edited by RiverBird; 02-17-2010 at 04:09 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2010, 04:43 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,638 posts, read 40,010,157 times
Reputation: 23801
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
My kids are not so financially stable that I could trust that, if I deeded my home to them, they would never incur debt and from that a lien would never happen. If there is some way I could deed the home to them I would, but I would hav to have legal assurance that the house could never have a lien and that I could live in it itll I die.

On another note, I just priced .. what it would cost to have a little kitchenette put into one of the six rooms in my house. The house is laid out so that it could be separated into two parts. --to have a house share--would really help me. ...I don;t know whether it would then be legally a 2 family (I do not want that) or, as I hope, just a situation for a house-share that happens to have a little kitchenette. Has anyone else done or thought of this?
Do the 'life estate' thing to protect yourself, AND do not give kids a POA (use someone else)

Our local building / zoning codes for single family residence allow for 6 unrelated singles in one home, OR one family unit (can be extended but only 1 related family per housing unit). A cooking range CAN NOT be permanently installed in more than one location in house, but no limitations on smaller kitchenettes / kitchens w/o range. I have an elect range for my lower level canning kitchen, but it is on wheels, just so it is not considered permanent. (and ez to move outside on a hot day.)

It is possible to add a 'hardship' exemption for additional building / living space which allows for a separate living space (With Range) as long as it is a family member and they require care AND it is temporary. (example is a double wide mobile home, or park model)

There are also some provisions for adding 'accessory dwelling structures' within the previously mentioned guidelines.

age in place =
http://www.boston.com/yourtown/newto...eir_own_homes/
""Launched by Boston’s Beacon Hill Village in 2002, the aging-in-place movement has spread to some 40 cities and towns across the United States.""
http://www.ageinplace.org/
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-18-2010, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,991,724 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
Do the 'life estate' thing to protect yourself, AND do not give kids a POA (use someone else)

Our local building / zoning codes for single family residence allow for 6 unrelated singles in one home, OR one family unit (can be extended but only 1
Is the 'life estate' the same thing as a revocable trust?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-18-2010, 10:34 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,638 posts, read 40,010,157 times
Reputation: 23801
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Is the 'life estate' the same thing as a revocable trust?
Here is a good explanation (center of page, not summary at top).
Revocable Living Trust Versus A Life Estate Deed | ThinkGlink

I am glad I have the 'revocable trust', as there is a higher level of control retained in case relationships or economy / needs / dreams / plans go 'south' after setting it up.

If you could imagine something like that happening ...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top