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Old 07-13-2010, 06:23 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,997,544 times
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I would love to get together with like minded others of my generation to live out my final years with mutual ideals--living with respect for the earth, conservation, and natural methods of eating, living, and dying. I am a true product of the boomer generation. I doubt there will be another generation like ours. Unlike the previous generation (the "greatest" generation b/c they survived the war and the Depression), we really tried to actively change things in the world for the better, and I'd be proud to end my days among others like me! Now, where would this "community" be? (no, not the Jonestown-Koolaid community....!)
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Old 07-13-2010, 12:05 PM
 
Location: SW US
2,224 posts, read 2,040,423 times
Reputation: 3839
Quote:
Originally Posted by Latashia View Post
I would love to get together with like minded others of my generation to live out my final years with mutual ideals--living with respect for the earth, conservation, and natural methods of eating, living, and dying. I am a true product of the boomer generation. I doubt there will be another generation like ours. Unlike the previous generation (the "greatest" generation b/c they survived the war and the Depression), we really tried to actively change things in the world for the better, and I'd be proud to end my days among others like me! Now, where would this "community" be? (no, not the Jonestown-Koolaid community....!)
I had a try at doing something like this in Colorado, but didn't get enough interest to make it worth the work it would have entailed. But I'm open to talking about doing something like this.
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Old 04-15-2013, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
16,721 posts, read 41,041,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
For those of you who are seniors or have elderly parents you're concerned about and you want a better understanding of Medicare, Medicaid and Long-Term Care programs, there's help available. Every state has a senior health insurance program of well trained, volunteer counselors you can meet with to get your questions answered. There's never a charge for the services and they do not represent or recommend any insurances. If you're already on a program and are having trouble sorting out bills, understanding policies, tracking who's paid what to whom, they'll do that for you as well.

My half-way joking approach to long-term care was always this: When the time comes for me to go to the home I'm going to get my gun, walk out to the peach orchard and blow my brains out. Hey, it's a plan, isn't it? The flaw to it is that when the time comes I have to be able to find the gun, actually make it all the way to the peach orchard and once there, remember why!
That is good information. It helped me find the state office for Arizona where my mother lives, I live in another state. We are trying to find out what assistance there might be for her. I'm bumping this thread as it contains a lot of good information and some discussions in another Retirement thread today were wondering about the Assisted Suicide issues.

For Arizona this website looks helpful: http://www.talk-early-talk-often.com...-services.html

More here https://www.google.com/search?q=stat...ient=firefox-a

Last edited by CptnRn; 04-15-2013 at 06:45 PM..
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Old 04-16-2013, 09:06 AM
 
13,334 posts, read 25,590,184 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wisteria View Post
By the way, your father sounds like a trip! I hope he is lucky enough to just "drop dead," because that's how it sounds like he'd like to go! I actually have a friend (true story) whose mother .... literally ... dropped dead while walking across the street with her husband while she was LAUGHING! Yes, she died LAUGHING! Now, to me, THAT is the way to go!!
Got a rep on my post of two+ years ago and thought I'd add a little update. On May 11, 2012, my father (87) went to the ER for painful constipation and was told he had pancreatic and liver cancer. He'd noticed a lack of appetite, food tasting weird and getting a bit winded on his daily two-mile walk (87!). He declined treatment and did have to go into a nursing home for two weeks with rather disjointed hospice care coming in (poor communications). Fortunately, he was not in pain and was just disgusted with the whole thing of falling and incontinence for the two weeks he was aware of it. He was mentally sharp until the last minute, when I think the pain meds scrambled him a bit. Four days unconscious, and gone. While he really wanted that heart attack, I think a relatively brief time of illness with minimal pain was as good as it gets.
I have long been grateful that there was no dementia in his old age, having seen such pitiful scenes at my job. To be honest, it was harder for me to know he was in a nursing home, waiting to die and feeling utterly humiliated at his situation, than it was for me to have him die, after all, at 87, I was expecting that phone call. So I miss him, and when I run into something about World War 2 or Israel or baseball, I think to call him and miss being able to do that, but again, I am ever-grateful he was ill briefly and had no dementia. Will be checking on his V.A. headstone next month to make sure they got the name spelled right and got the Jewish star on it. That's all he wanted.
Thank a veteran, every day.
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Old 04-17-2013, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Wherever I happen to be at the moment
1,229 posts, read 1,139,740 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
Got a rep on my post of two+ years ago and thought I'd add a little update. On May 11, 2012, my father (87) went to the ER for painful constipation and was told he had pancreatic and liver cancer. He'd noticed a lack of appetite, food tasting weird and getting a bit winded on his daily two-mile walk (87!). He declined treatment and did have to go into a nursing home for two weeks with rather disjointed hospice care coming in (poor communications). Fortunately, he was not in pain and was just disgusted with the whole thing of falling and incontinence for the two weeks he was aware of it. He was mentally sharp until the last minute, when I think the pain meds scrambled him a bit. Four days unconscious, and gone. While he really wanted that heart attack, I think a relatively brief time of illness with minimal pain was as good as it gets.
I have long been grateful that there was no dementia in his old age, having seen such pitiful scenes at my job. To be honest, it was harder for me to know he was in a nursing home, waiting to die and feeling utterly humiliated at his situation, than it was for me to have him die, after all, at 87, I was expecting that phone call. So I miss him, and when I run into something about World War 2 or Israel or baseball, I think to call him and miss being able to do that, but again, I am ever-grateful he was ill briefly and had no dementia. Will be checking on his V.A. headstone next month to make sure they got the name spelled right and got the Jewish star on it. That's all he wanted.
Thank a veteran, every day.
I'm glad for both of you that your father's passing was relatively swift. I sympathize with the missing him part, especially the inability to talk, ask, discuss - just connect. Both of my parents have been gone for decades and that's something I still miss. Hope all has been right with the VA for him with the same wish for myself when the time comes. In the end your father lived a good, long life. Something to celebrate.
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Old 04-17-2013, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Lower east side of Toronto
10,586 posts, read 10,783,334 times
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When I get old and feeble I will do one thing- I will hide from all of you. Being old is quickly becoming what the Jews were during the Nazi era. We will all become Ann Franks and avoid death as long as possible. If you are old and enter into a hospital - the policy will in time become that which enhances the death house. Forget it- I am not going to a place where they will morphine you to death and tell your children that "He is resting comfortably"

Keep your health and avoid them- The medical profession and the government are not your friends near the end.
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Old 04-18-2013, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
16,721 posts, read 41,041,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
State of Oregon: Death With Dignity Act

It's legal in Oregon. It's called assisted because the doctor can prescribe the drugs to "assist" a person to die rather than the person just going out and jumping off a bridge. The only method is by drugs. People use this plan carefully. Some have loved ones around when they take the drugs. There have been stories in our local newspaper by the friends and relatives who witness the deaths.

The stories are positive because the families and friends know that the person wants to have that control when the time comes. Plans are made and everyone gets to say goodbye. Really when you read about actual situations, or witness them first hand, you get a feeling that it's a much better way; choosing the time and place rather than fighting for life in a sterile hospital.

I feel this way because I have seen it. I don't plan to stay in Oregon but if I did and I had a terminal illness, I would not hesitate to go this route.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gandalara View Post
Washington has Initiative 1000, which was approved Nov. 4, 2008

And on Dec. 31, 2009, the Montana Supreme Court stated that while the state's Constitution did not guarantee a right to physician-assisted suicide, "nothing in Montana Supreme Court precedent or Montana statutes indicating that physician aid in dying is against public policy."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
Interesting. I did not know that. I thought that more states would follow suit after Oregon did it. But it doesn't look like that is the case.
I feel confident that other states will follow suit eventually, with all of the baby boomers retiring. But I have to recognize that it is now 2013 and nothing has changed from the previous posts above. I guess we need to start raising hell with our legislatures to force some action on this. Sadly it will probably be necessary given the number of "religious" folks that don't think we have a right to make this decision for ourselves.
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Old 04-26-2013, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
16,721 posts, read 41,041,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
One comment I would like to make about assisted suicide. I have known two people who chose that option. A social worker who was assigned to one of them told me something interesting. She said that of all the people who signed up for it, few actually used it. She said most people feel they have a little more time than they really do. Nobody really knows. More often than not the person dies before they decide to take the drugs they are given. That was the case of one of the people I knew.

The social worker pointed out that it is the idea and the comfort to most people who chose this option that they; not doctors or hospitals or relatives have the control and choice of when to go when they and only they decide it's time.

They are given the drugs they need. It's up to them to call in whomever they want to be there at the time they decide to use them. It's their call. But it is the comfort of knowing that if the pain gets to be too much, if they don't want to go to a hospital and if they just plain want to take control of their remaing days it is a tremendous relief to have the knowledge that they and only they are in control.

I don't believe that is correct. I recently saw some statistics on how many assisted suicide perscriptions had been written and used, it may have been earlier in this thread. Most of them have been used (60%?), a good number of them have been filled and are being held by the owner until they feel the time is right. I will try to find those statistics to share.

Here is one recent article:
Quote:
April 10, 2013 http://health.usnews.com/health-news...ed-study-finds

Washington's Death With Dignity Act hasn't lead to scores of terminally ill people seeking lethal prescriptions, the researchers report: Almost three years after the law was enacted, just 255 people had obtained a lethal prescription from a physician.
Of those 255 prescriptions, 40 were written for terminal cancer patients at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. And, in the new study, doctors there found that only 60 percent (24 people) of their patients chose to use their prescription to hasten their death.


From March 2009 through December 2011, 114 patients at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance asked about the Death With Dignity program. Of these, 44 chose not to pursue the program at all. Another 30 people initiated the process, but either chose not to continue to the next step, or died in the interim.


Forty patients received a prescription for a lethal dose of secobarbital, a powerful sedative. Twenty-four patients died after ingesting the medication. On average, the time from ingestion to death was 35 minutes. The remaining 16 patients chose not to use their prescription and eventually died from their cancer.
So 60% of those who chose to pursue the program used the prescriptions. The remaining patients died without using it but at least they had the choice if dieing from the cancer became too unpleasant. I think the important thing here is having the choice and the right to make that decision for yourself.

Last edited by CptnRn; 04-26-2013 at 01:57 PM..
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Old 04-26-2013, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,698 posts, read 23,692,507 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CptnRn View Post
I don't believe that is correct. I recently saw some statistics on how many assisted suicide perscriptions had been written and used, it may have been earlier in this thread. Most of them have been used (60%?), a good number of them have been filled and are being held by the owner until they feel the time is right. I will try to find those statistics to share.

Here is one recent article:
So 60% of those who chose to pursue the program used the prescriptions. The remaining patients died without using it but at least they had the choice if dieing from the cancer became too unpleasant. I think the important thing here is having the choice and the right to make that decision for yourself.
That is the point the social worker was making when she told me this. It really doesn't matter what the stats are when you come down to it. It's how the dignity and the welfare of the dying person is held in consideration that counts.
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Old 04-26-2013, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,997,544 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oleg Bach View Post
When I get old and feeble I will do one thing- I will hide from all of you. Being old is quickly becoming what the Jews were during the Nazi era. We will all become Ann Franks and avoid death as long as possible. If you are old and enter into a hospital - the policy will in time become that which enhances the death house. Forget it- I am not going to a place where they will morphine you to death and tell your children that "He is resting comfortably"

Keep your health and avoid them- The medical profession and the government are not your friends near the end.
And stay on good terms with friends and family.
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