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View Poll Results: When did you (or when do you plan to) start taking Social Security benefits?
Age 62 66 55.00%
Age 63 2 1.67%
Age 64 3 2.50%
Age 65 10 8.33%
Age 66 19 15.83%
Age 67 or older 20 16.67%
Voters: 120. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-15-2010, 01:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GLS View Post
This is the source of disagreement between my wife and myself. She believes I should "die with the biggest pile of money" so she can go on "living the best darn life she can".
But that's as it should be!
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Old 02-15-2010, 01:26 PM
 
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now thats funny.......
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Old 02-15-2010, 01:45 PM
GLS
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by highcotton View Post
Exactly when does she think you will die?
Not sure. I'm postponing any plans she has by reminding her the next anniversary, birthday, or Xmas gift could be a BIG one. One thing I'm sure of, I learned that I'm not letting her get together with "YankinScotland" to discuss the subject!
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Old 02-15-2010, 02:18 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GLS View Post
Not sure. I'm postponing any plans she has by reminding her the next anniversary, birthday, or Xmas gift could be a BIG one. One thing I'm sure of, I learned that I'm not letting her get together with "YankinScotland" to discuss the subject!
Moi Why not? We can plan future holidays you guys wouldn't take us on, and what we'll do to the house that you guys wouldn't agree to, what kind of car to buy that you guys didn't like...etc etc.
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Old 02-15-2010, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,975,704 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by highcotton View Post
I understand.

I just don't understand why people elect to take SS early (and lock-in a lower and fixed amount for life) unless they feel certain they will die early...or they have lost their job and given up on finding one and have no retirement savings or meaningful assets they can pull from until they reach age 66.
I have a question. I had to stop working at age 60 due to health problems. Now, I could possibly manage to age 66 on my savings, but--- will my not working those 6 years lower what I was supposed to get from SS if I had kept working till retirement age?

I realize I have to call the SS office for this. Just wondering what to expect.
Thanks...
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Old 02-15-2010, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,975,704 times
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oops, one more question...

If a spouse was married more than 10 years and becomes divorced, does she get the ex's SS benefit on top of her own, or as an option instead of her own? (I apologize if I went off topic)
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Old 02-15-2010, 05:18 PM
 
Location: zippidy doo dah
895 posts, read 1,331,326 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
oops, one more question...

If a spouse was married more than 10 years and becomes divorced, does she get the ex's SS benefit on top of her own, or as an option instead of her own? (I apologize if I went off topic)
On this question, I have the answer. The former spouse can choose between 1/2 of her ex's full benefit OR 100 percent of her own/whichever is higher (provided she is not married at the time to someone else/if you remarry and then divorce again, you again qualify for the benefits of the 10 year plus ex spouse.

But she can't take both her benefit and 1/2 the ex's. In the event of the ex's death at any point, she will receive 100 percent of the ex's benefit. Again, I am about 100 percent sure she cannot receive both hers and the ex's benefits as an ex-spouse widow. This applies both ways - so one can switch "he" for "she" at will.

In many cases, 100 percent of one's own benefit exceeds 50 percent of the ex's.
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Old 02-15-2010, 05:25 PM
 
Location: zippidy doo dah
895 posts, read 1,331,326 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
I have a question. I had to stop working at age 60 due to health problems. Now, I could possibly manage to age 66 on my savings, but--- will my not working those 6 years lower what I was supposed to get from SS if I had kept working till retirement age?

I realize I have to call the SS office for this. Just wondering what to expect.
Thanks...
I'll take a stab at this one. On the report one gets from social security annually, it generally says what your benefit would be based on your present salary were you to continue to work until I assume age 66 (depending on your birth year and the change in when each of us can retire). So that amount is likely higher than what you will receive if you stepped out of the work force earlier than retirement age. Someone can chime in here if that amount they estimate for you is based on retirement at age 62. I'm assuming that while you stopped working for health reasons, you didn't qualify for social security disability. With disability, each annual statement reports what you would receive if you were to be disabled at the time of the issuance of the statement so that number is pretty reliable and is not projected on anticipated future earnings.

My ex thought that I would likely be eligible for his higher benefits now because of disability issues but since disability is based on one's own work history, the issue of his higher benefits don't figure in until I am of retirement age. Now, that is what I am assuming is the case. I haven't asked but I suppose at some point I should ask even if I think I know the answer.

Hope this helps!
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Old 02-15-2010, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,975,704 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by triciajeanne View Post
On this question, I have the answer. The former spouse can choose between 1/2 of her ex's full benefit OR 100 percent of her own/whichever is higher (provided she is not married at the time to someone else/if you remarry and then divorce again, you again qualify for the benefits of the 10 year plus ex spouse.

But she can't take both her benefit and 1/2 the ex's. In the event of the ex's death at any point, she will receive 100 percent of the ex's benefit. Again, I am about 100 percent sure she cannot receive both hers and the ex's benefits as an ex-spouse widow. This applies both ways - so one can switch "he" for "she" at will.

In many cases, 100 percent of one's own benefit exceeds 50 percent of the ex's.
In the red, above, does that mean "100% of deceased spouse's benefit" in addition to one's own benefit?

Thanks for clarifying, and I know that many are going to tell me to call SS to get the facts.
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Old 02-15-2010, 05:52 PM
 
Location: zippidy doo dah
895 posts, read 1,331,326 times
Reputation: 1928
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
In the red, above, does that mean "100% of deceased spouse's benefit" in addition to one's own benefit?

Thanks for clarifying, and I know that many are going to tell me to call SS to get the facts.

almost positive the answer is NO - if you are married and your spouse dies, you may be able to receive both your benefit and theirs but I don't know on that.

but I am mostly mostly certain that if your EX dies, you cannot collect both your benefit and 100 percent of their benefit. My benefits are so low that I know 1/2 of my ex's will exceed my 100 per cent. And I sure know that 100 percent of his benefits will definitely exceed my 100 per cent. So there is no question what i will be doing, without hurrying him along to better my financial porfolio.....however, YankInScotland, let me get your address.....
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