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Old 12-24-2015, 09:41 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gbpakrfan View Post
The other major reason for ruling out an "older" community was that along with older houses come older neighbors. (Before I go any further, let me jump in and say I have nothing against old people. In fact, I am an old person...and hope to keep getting old for a while longer.) Okay, now that I have that out of the way...

Maybe I should replace the term "older neighbors" with "established neighbors". We realized that trying to break into social circles that were established 20 years ago might be tough. Kind of like being the new kid in a high school where all the kids had been friends since nursery school. Sometimes being the new kid on the block...literally, in this case...can be a challenge.

I do NOT live in a Del Webb community but I do live in an 55+ community. This particular HOA was developed in 1981-83. Many of our neighbors are 75+ but 90% of the people who are buying the older units and remodeling are 55-65.

One of my concerns about moving to the area was that we were the "new kids on the block." We jokingly said that when we arrived in the community two years ago, that we were carded to make sure that we were old enough.

While we were concerned about being "shunned", we found the exact opposite. People went out of their way to be friendly, helpful, and neighborly. One neighbor watches our house when we travel. Another has taught us how to maintain our house in the desert. When my wife had her knee replaced, neighbors provided her with anything that she needed medical equipment wise. When my tire was flat, two of my neighbors changed it before I called AAA.

The older people in my neighborhood are pretty excited to see some fresh blood in the neighborhood. It helps that we are willing to help out with the HOA, teach classes in the community and fill some long unfilled positions in various organizations in the area.

Because people have remained physically active over the years, my neighbors are in darned good shape. Most 80 year olds in colder regions of the country look it. I have a couple 80 year olds that I walk with who can cover 3.5 miles in an hour without breaking a sweat.
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Old 12-24-2015, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johngolf View Post
When I reference senior facilities I am not talking about the nearness of doctors, dentists, shopping, transportation, etc. I am referring to more of an assisted living arrangement, home services, etc. Especially true if one half of a couple needs such.

I love Del Webb Hilton Head, but it is not a "assistance needed in retirement" facility nor was it designed to be.
That's what I was talking about too. If someone is 55 to perhaps 65 - it probably isn't an issue (unless you have parents you might have to care for). OTOH - if the average age of people moving into Del Webb communities is closer to 75 - it is more likely to become an issue for that average buyer. Although some people have problems when they're younger - others when they're older - I think 80 is about the time many start to have problem based on what I've seen. Robyn
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Old 12-24-2015, 01:38 PM
 
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Let me clarify I suggested many were 72 ish to 75 when moving in. You can design your home to facilitate independent living things being aged accessible. In a lot of ways it seems conducive to the village movement
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Old 12-24-2015, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johngolf View Post
As said:

Del Webb is basically a developer. An outfit that builds houses. Not an outfit that plans - builds - or operates "senior facilities".

Ones first retirement place may well not be their last. More need to understand and plan on this.
Agree with your last sentence. And I think I lot depends on the prospective buyer's age and current health status. Overall - I think people 55-70 would be fine in a Del Webb 55+ type of place (or similar). Once you're in your mid-70's - I'd think twice about buying in a place like this. Because the odds are good that a person and/or his/her spouse may need additional care at some point in their 80's. I've seen a fair number of couples in this age group where one is in an independent senior facility type of place - and the other is in an ALF or a SNF.

Also - decisions about moves that have to be made for health reasons often can't be made in a leisurely discretionary way. And people who have to sell quickly for these reasons may be at a disadvantage when it comes to selling (especially if they're still competing against a developer). Overall - I'd say that most people should move to a place like this before they're 70-75 if they're going to do it at all.

FWIW - this is just one of many issues when it comes to these communities. For example - our local Del Webb place is in a CDD (common in Florida - don't know about elsewhere) - and I wouldn't touch those with a 10 foot pole. Robyn
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Old 12-24-2015, 02:37 PM
 
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Anybody have any thoughts how Del Webb communities play out with Reverse Mortgages? Advantage disadvantage? Robyn raises some good points which I gave been trying to wrap around.

Last edited by TuborgP; 12-24-2015 at 02:56 PM..
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Old 12-24-2015, 03:02 PM
 
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More Single Female Baby Boomers Buying New Homes | Pulte Homes Newsroom | Builder Magazine

Interesting short article that they don't want to give up luxury features upon moving which many plan to do.
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Old 12-24-2015, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
Let me clarify I suggested many were 72 ish to 75 when moving in. You can design your home to facilitate independent living things being aged accessible. In a lot of ways it seems conducive to the village movement
Guess you could do that. But I think you'd pretty much dent your resale value if you made all of the necessary modifications (what 55-60 year old wants to buy a house in an "active retirement community" that looks like a place where Mom and/or Dad lives)? Note that we're talking about more than a grab bar in the shower. My father does whatever he wants to in his villa these days (lord knows what the landlord will charge to get things back to normal when he leaves - but who cares?) - but he can't make some modifications he needs (like those bars on the sides of toilets to help him get up/down) without pretty much gutting the place. There's a whole laundry list of things - like wheelchair accessible size door openings. My father has those. But - if they're not standard in a Del Webb house - it would probably be an expensive option (Pulte builds tract homes - not custom homes).

Also - there are "senior" safety features these places simply don't have. For example - my father has a buzzer he has to ring in the morning to tell the front desk he's ok. He also has a chain he can pull to summon emergency care (which includes a nurse in the house). Many residents use these features - especially when they have falls (that old "I've fallen and I can't get up" isn't a joke when you see how many falls these older people have).

Like I've said - it's a very personal thing - and I am just talking about the odds in general. My father lived in a single family house until he was in his late 80's and my mother died. He didn't need a lot of these "senior" things until he was in his 90's. But many people need them in their 80's - and some need them earlier. Also - there's the issue of taking care of what is simply a personally owned single family house. My father is a handy guy who always has and still does a lot of things himself (including putting up about 10000 linear feet of grab bars in his apartment ). Other people are too. I am not - and many women aren't either. So - if a handy husband dies first - or both spouses aren't handy - you still have to take care of the house (except perhaps for landscape work on a tiny lot). In terms of maintenance/repairs. Either by yourself or by hiring others.*

My husband and I currently plan to stay in our single family house until we can't anymore. I don't care if we have to remodel to accommodate any future infirmities we might have - or pay people to help us do the things we can't do (neither of us has ever been handy ). But - overall - I don't see how where we live is much different than a Del Webb community. Except the houses in our HOA are bigger (most people have kids) - and there are no age restrictions. We have plenty of local activities that are available to everyone (although some require the payment of money). Perhaps the appeal of a Del Webb place is people have a vision of life in a neat package tied up with a "big bow"? I'm not sure life ever works that way. Robyn

P.S. I think that Village Movement thing is a bunch of hooey if you're talking about seniors living in fairly expensive (Del Webb) houses and volunteering to maintain their neighbors' houses (as opposed to doing something like bringing over a casserole if someone is sick and can't cook - which is what some people do where I live). First off - many - like us - are incompetent in those areas. Even if we weren't - I have no desire to work on someone else's (expensive) house for free. Second - I had a long "honey do" list for our 40ish year old home handyman this week (we've known him/used him since he was in his 20's - he was the "super" when we were building our house). Many of the tasks were "up there" (we have 10 foot high ceilings. We don't like doing anything on tall ladders (many seniors don't). One job was putting new batteries in smoke detectors. And then we found out 2 of our 3 smoke detectors were dead. So our home handyman made a lunch dash to Home Depot - bought new smoke detectors - and then installed them (they're wired into the electrical system). Even if I found a 75 year old volunteer to do a job like this - I honestly wouldn't trust any stranger to do it. It's kind of like the old people in my father's place who volunteer to drive other residents. They are willing - but many are incompetent drivers (they just don't know it).
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Old 12-24-2015, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,917,951 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
More Single Female Baby Boomers Buying New Homes | Pulte Homes Newsroom | Builder Magazine

Interesting short article that they don't want to give up luxury features upon moving which many plan to do.
You and I (both age 68 or so) are among the oldest baby boomers (my husband - older - isn't a "boomer"). There are quite a few many years younger than we are. And I'm not sure we're talking about the most intelligent buyers in the world here. My father takes OLLI classes. A woman in his class about my age was looking at the Del Webb place here. And - as is his want (he's a retired builder) - my father asked her a couple of dozen intelligent questions about what she was buying. And she was totally clueless (e.g., among other things - she knew how wide her lot was but not how deep ). But she bought anyway.

I am not sure most people know what to look for when they're buying a house - especially if they're moving to a new area where good/better/best construction practices might vary a lot compared to where they're moving from. Most people here seem more interested in granite kitchen counters than building termite resistant houses (they honestly don't seem interested in the latter at all). My father is a PITA in a lot of ways - but he really knows about building. So - before we selected our builder - we had him walk through houses the guy we wanted to hire was building. When he gave the fellow his "blessing" - I know we'd be ok.

FWIW - when Del Webb started building here - it was building CBS (concrete block stucco). Which I thought was great. Only way to go in Florida IMO. But - since buyers didn't seem interested in good construction - it switched to cheaper inferior stick construction (without lowering prices). Maybe if you're old - don't plan to live in a place for more than 5-10 years or care what it's worth when you leave - it might not bother you to buy a "disposable house" (they can require tons of expensive maintenance when they're pretty young). Robyn
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Old 12-25-2015, 12:58 PM
 
29,764 posts, read 34,848,700 times
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The following link is from a Carolina Arbors thread in the Raleigh forum:
Carolina Arbors
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Old 12-28-2015, 06:55 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johngolf View Post
As said:

Del Webb is basically a developer. An outfit that builds houses. Not an outfit that plans - builds - or operates "senior facilities".


Ones first retirement place may well not be their last. More need to understand and plan on this.
That for us is becoming the thought of doing it in a nutshell. Yes like Robyn noted doing it at 60 when we declined is different than at 72 when we are now considering it. As you note doing so would be concurrent with our planning for later senior year needs. It is a place we could find ourselves needing an alternative to in a few years. Carolina Arbors while close in with everything around is not cheap and that is a lot of equity to have tied up in a house as we would only be interested in the higher price range options. There is another similar place at the coast but the comments I have read about it describe it as a ghost town of old people. So perhaps we continue to weigh options looking for the right place with support available, hopefully in Raleigh. As Robyn notes the wild card is managing for two people if their lives take different paths and that means as much liquid and fixed income assets as possible and I have little interest in risking throwing that away.

Last edited by TuborgP; 12-28-2015 at 07:09 AM..
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