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Old 04-30-2010, 04:46 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyfishnevada View Post
I just worry that finding like minded people in our age range will be difficult and finding older retirees that share our interests will also be tough. In other words we have a much smaller pool of people to choose from since we are the exception, not the rule.
We are in our early 60's and have a couple down the road who are just 40. We have become great friends and since one spouse's weekly work schedule varies he spends a lot of time with us and helps on projects with us. We go out to dinner and have many of the same interests, so the age difference isn't even noticeable.
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Old 05-02-2010, 06:24 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Originally Posted by UrbanAdventurer View Post
Sounds boring to me, but I'm a good 30 years from 58 so who knows-maybe boring will be the new fun for me by then. My hunch is that i'll still be happily working at 58, but hopefully with bigger paychecks and longer vacations!
I see by your name that you are a city type. Old or young big city events don't interest me so it's not just an age thing but a location thing. You, for example, might enjoy dressing up and going out to dinner in a splashy restaurant for conversation with friends, followed by a concert in a big venue. I like to have that exact same conversation in jeans and a tee shirt, at a picnic table, followed by a concert in an outdoor pavillion at some park. We both like good conversation and music but we go about it in different ways. That will still be true when you retire.
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Old 05-02-2010, 11:50 AM
 
28,232 posts, read 39,879,137 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
I see by your name that you are a city type. Old or young big city events don't interest me so it's not just an age thing but a location thing. You, for example, might enjoy dressing up and going out to dinner in a splashy restaurant for conversation with friends, followed by a concert in a big venue. I like to have that exact same conversation in jeans and a tee shirt, at a picnic table, followed by a concert in an outdoor pavillion at some park. We both like good conversation and music but we go about it in different ways. That will still be true when you retire.

We both like either way. Of course the winter weather around here dictates a certain restriction on the picnicking and outdoor concerts, but summer gives plenty of opportunities.
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Old 05-10-2015, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
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Default What did you learn?

Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
This month I will be retired 3 years. I would like to update the things I learned after 1 year.

1. I still don't miss work. I worked for the same government agency for 34 years (different jobs). I still use some of my work skills in retirement. In fact, this year Iím teaching a retiree class that's computer research related. Anyone else using work skills in retirement in, for example, hobby, club, volunteer, home improvement activities? C'mon, how many of you former managers are officers in some club or organization? How many former carpenters have related home projects or do carpentry type work for events/clubs/their church? How many retired teachers are still doing some type of instruction in their hobby or clubs or volunteer work? How many former sales people/former police officers/deal with the public retirees are still involved in "people person" retiree activities? I bet you never even gave it any thought. You just sort of fell into it.


2. Your ďfriendsĒ from work are just that...but we donít even bother with Christmas cards, anymore. Out of sight, out of mind. I do miss my long-time friends, though, especially after making a trip to see some of them last year. We still keep in touch even though they are in 3 different states. But, they arenít all retired and our interests are no longer the same. Also, three of them have spouses. Let me ask you single/divorced/widowed retirees a question. Is it harder to socialize with your married retiree friends when there is a spouse underfoot? I think it was easier when we were all working. We did things when the spouse was tied up with other things but now the spouse is ALWAYS there. It feels more intrusive. Am I wrong? I think it would bother me if I had to deal with it, regularly.


3. I'm more observant and things in my surroundings interest me more now that I'm retired. This is still true from Year One. I can sit for hours and study bird behavior. Fell into the hobby of outdoor photography since retired and Iíve actually gotten better at it and even won a few awards last year. I can actually see the improvement. My camera gives me the opportunity to look at things and people differently and give me a reason to get out, be patient and observe. I think itís probably because I have the time to be aware of my environment as a retiree that I didn't have when I was working. How about you?


4. Okay, here's a change. Retirees I come in contact with regularly span the ages of 55 - 85 (I'm currently 58) and after the first week or two, I stopped noticing the age difference but now I do notice something. Donít get me wrong they are still wonderful intelligent people who have lived and still live amazing lives. I like talking to them. I like hearing about their lives. Many are still world travelers and active. I do notice technological differences and communication differences, though. Iíd say the whole computer age passed most of the older retirees, by. It makes it tougher to communicate and share information across the generational divide. Still, I hope I am as mentally and physically capable as they are if I get to be the age of some of those 80+ year olds. You know, if you like to bike or hike, bowl or garden, for example, you are going to meet others, regardless of their age, who can physically do those things, too. If you like to take classes, there aren't going to be people in those classes who have lost their mental capabilities. In other words, your activities and not your age, will determine your common interest friends in retirement. Anyone here, who retired fairly young, have any generational retirement problems? How about the opposite? Any older retirees have problems with younger retirees?


5. Retirement didn't change my good/bad personal habits like I thought it might. Still true after 3 years. My TV watching hours and reading habits didn't change when I stopped working. I still buy and read as many books as I used to, maybe more. I still don't turn on the TV until dinner time. I still prefer to shop online. I still like reading and posting to assorted forums. I still hate housework. I still procrastinate. I still hate walking for the sake of walking (as opposed to walking TO something). I still can't remember people's names. I still go to bed when I'm tired, not at any particular hour at night. I still eat stuff thatís not good for me. I still underdress in cold weather (no hat, no gloves, lightweight jacket). I still like taking classes/learning new things. So are there any retirees here who shed their bad habits after they retired or picked up new good habits after they retired or did we all just carry our good/bad habits into retirement?


6. The interest in my new town has waned since Year One of my retirement. I have favorite activities but the newness excitement has worn off. If I miss an annual event, it doesnít bother me because Iíve done it already. Iím more choosy now. I donít have to do everything. Plus, classes, school breaks, club meetings, weather conditions, appointments have established replacement routines. People who have moved in retirement, do you feel the same way? After you are in the new place for about two years, are you more picky about how you spend your time and have youíve developed new routines?


7. Still never in a hurry/feel I have to rush since being retired. BUT, hereís one you can laugh at and look forward to if you are not yet retired. I have no idea when itís a holiday, anymore. There were so many people out and about the day after we had some snow. I was thinking their offices and schools closed because of the weather. It was a holiday and I didnít even know it. Sure you are aware of the big ones when you get company or visit people but those other ones? Every day is a holiday when you are retired. There are no such things as weekends to live for. Monday is just as great as Saturday.


8. Bad weather - big deal! Seriously, if you are retired, you can wait for the sun to melt the snow off your windshield. Icy roads? Don't go out. Reschedule your appointments for just about any other day. Too humid? Do your outdoor stuff before 10:00A or in the evening or tomorrow. No schedule - fewer weather concerns. C'mon, how many retirees, that you know, are out there at 7:00A on a winter weekday scraping off their windshield or heating up the car? I'm betting - ZERO. Maybe they saunter out after the sun has been up for a few hours and push the ice off the windshield...


9. Tired? Don't feel well? Lay down. Remember when you were at work and you had a miserable headache or were nauseous or couldn't keep your eyes open and it was such a big deal to go home. It was a big deal to leave work and it was a big deal to actually get home when you were sick. Hey, you can go to bed at 1:00P or 10:00A and sleep as long as you like when you are ill or just plain tired and retired. The clock is no longer your enemy.


10. Work costs a lot. Retirement doesn't have to. I have more money as a retiree with half the income. First, I'm not forced to live in a high tax, overly regulated (pass down business costs), high cost of living area. But, I also don't fill up my gas tank as frequently. I don't hit some vending machine for drinks/snacks. I don't go to the dry cleaners every week because I live in machine washable play clothes now. I don't pay as much for play clothes as I did for work clothes. I don't eat out for lunch five days a week or buy cafeteria lunches. I don't chip in for gifts/parties.

You'd be surprised at the number of free events/free things to do. I have found out that there are many people everywhere who want to show you their skills/talent, make a presentation or teach you something. I didn't even know things like this existed when I was working. You can easily do 1 - 2 things per week, all year long, free. It may be a fair or festival. It may be a free concert. It may be a free learning event (example: park rangers teach some type of nature related thing or take you on some hike). It may be some history re-enactment. It may be a free subject related show (art/crafts). It may be a place that just doesn't charge for admission/parking. It may be a local sporting event (a high school football game, a race, a rowing event, etc.).

This doesn't even include cheap hobbies/activities.

11. What's an alarm clock? I don't even have one in the bedroom. If there is some once-in-awhile activity where I have to get up early in the morning, I set my cell phone to wake up. On the other hand, the calendar is a big deal. Since most events aren't part of a regular schedule or routine, I rely on my calendar more in retirement.
This is an interesting thread from the past.

For recent retirees, what have you learned?
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Old 05-10-2015, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,954 posts, read 7,388,974 times
Reputation: 16278
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
This month I will be retired 3 years. I would like to update the things I learned after 1 year.

1. I still don't miss work. I worked for the same government agency for 34 years (different jobs). I still use some of my work skills in retirement. In fact, this year Iím teaching a retiree class that's computer research related. Anyone else using work skills in retirement in, for example, hobby, club, volunteer, home improvement activities? .

Yes, I was a project manager and have had many projects going on that I manage to track. A friend wants to learn how to "get a grip on it all".


2. Your ďfriendsĒ from work are just that...but we donít even bother with Christmas cards, anymore. Out of sight, out of mind. I do miss my long-time friends, though, especially after making a trip to see some of them last year. We still keep in touch even though they are in 3 different states. But, they arenít all retired and our interests are no longer the same. Also, three of them have spouses. Let me ask you single/divorced/widowed retirees a question. Is it harder to socialize with your married retiree friends when there is a spouse underfoot? I think it was easier when we were all working. We did things when the spouse was tied up with other things but now the spouse is ALWAYS there. It feels more intrusive. Am I wrong? I think it would bother me if I had to deal with it, regularly.


This is something I have a hard time with. There was a group of us that worked together that I felt had developed close friendships. We managed to stay in touch when 1 or more retired and then when all retired but then - poof - we just stopped all lunches, brunches etc... I could feel that our conversations were getting more and more strained - what we had in common, we no longer had in common. Now it's down to 1 person. I keep in touch with people that I met earlier in my career when we were wild and crazy.

3. I'm more observant and things in my surroundings interest me more now that I'm retired. This is still true from Year One. I can sit for hours and study bird behavior. Fell into the hobby of outdoor photography since retired and Iíve actually gotten better at it and even won a few awards last year. I can actually see the improvement. My camera gives me the opportunity to look at things and people differently and give me a reason to get out, be patient and observe. I think itís probably because I have the time to be aware of my environment as a retiree that I didn't have when I was working. How about you?

I have slowed down a great deal - TG - no longer doing so many things at the same time and don't know how I ever did it. It took me years to stop with the "gotta do this...gotta do that...." behavior. I definitely appreciate nature more, love phutzing in the garden, etc...


5. Retirement didn't change my good/bad personal habits like I thought it might. Still true after 3 years. My TV watching hours and reading habits didn't change when I stopped working. I still buy and read as many books as I used to, maybe more. I still don't turn on the TV until dinner time. I still prefer to shop online. I still like reading and posting to assorted forums. I still hate housework. I still procrastinate. I still hate walking for the sake of walking (as opposed to walking TO something). I still can't remember people's names. I still go to bed when I'm tired, not at any particular hour at night. I still eat stuff thatís not good for me. I still underdress in cold weather (no hat, no gloves, lightweight jacket). I still like taking classes/learning new things. So are there any retirees here who shed their bad habits after they retired or picked up new good habits after they retired or did we all just carry our good/bad habits into retirement?

I found I have to really push myself to get certain things done now where that wasn't a problem before. I use that "there's always tomorrow and nobody to answer to...." line too much (really like it)

8. Bad weather - big deal! Seriously, if you are retired, you can wait for the sun to melt the snow off your windshield. Icy roads? Don't go out. Reschedule your appointments for just about any other day. Too humid? Do your outdoor stuff before 10:00A or in the evening or tomorrow. No schedule - fewer weather concerns. C'mon, how many retirees, that you know, are out there at 7:00A on a winter weekday scraping off their windshield or heating up the car? I'm betting - ZERO. Maybe they saunter out after the sun has been up for a few hours and push the ice off the windshield...

This is something I am sooooo grateful for. I was out there between 6-6:30 a.m. - no scraping with a garage but I remember being up at 4 a.m. shoveling so I could get out of the driveway. No snow removal company could guarantee to have it done by 6:30 a.m.


9. Tired? Don't feel well? Lay down. Remember when you were at work and you had a miserable headache or were nauseous or couldn't keep your eyes open and it was such a big deal to go home. It was a big deal to leave work and it was a big deal to actually get home when you were sick. Hey, you can go to bed at 1:00P or 10:00A and sleep as long as you like when you are ill or just plain tired and retired. The clock is no longer your enemy.

This is wonderful.



11. What's an alarm clock? I don't even have one in the bedroom. If there is some once-in-awhile activity where I have to get up early in the morning, I set my cell phone to wake up. On the other hand, the calendar is a big deal. Since most events aren't part of a regular schedule or routine, I rely on my calendar more in retirement.
This one makes me laugh because the only time I use the alarm is when I have to get something like mulch where I'll need the special carts. I have to get there first thing before they are all gone. This will be happening tomorrow. But, then I can come home and take a nap.
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Old 05-11-2015, 12:26 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,545 posts, read 39,924,861 times
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Quote:
4. Okay, here's a change. Retirees I come in contact with regularly span the ages of 55 - 85 (I'm currently 58)
I treasure NOT being age segregated. I have retiree friends from age 30 - age 96; and worker / social friends of all ages. I seek events situations where I can 'span-the-generations'. Worked great as a homeschooler too. I have friends in 55+ communities who are always complaining about the 'elderly age' of the neighbors / board members, so I don't doubt it is a real problem if allowed to be.

Quote:
5. Retirement didn't change my good/bad personal habits like I thought it might.
I'm not happy about this one... dirty laundry follows us around. It is a lot of work to CHANGE, but freeing to (finally) accomplish it. (Work in process). I have 'declined' in personal disciplines, so I best realize the negative effect this will bear on my health, success, and productivity. ('retirement' Honeymoon needs to end). I got back to my High School weight, but can't seem to get the width to recover... need to work on that. Having all day to eat ice cream doesn't help.
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Old 05-11-2015, 02:15 AM
 
34,361 posts, read 41,436,735 times
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A few things i've learned in Retirement.
All those workplace friends are situational friendships,once you are gone so is all that camaraderie.
While i dont miss the work i certainly miss the social dynamics of the workplace.
All those things you dreamed you would do in retirement end up only filling 10% of your time.
Those grandiose plans you dreamed of when you retire cost a lot more than you thought.
Now that you dont work staying relevant in life aint so easy for some of us.
When dreaming of retirement i thought the wife and i would do a lot of traveling,the problem i never considered is she wont retire for another 10 years
While some retire and dont have enough hours in the day to do all their activities for others(like me) retirement becomes somewhat of a boring monotony.
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Old 05-11-2015, 04:09 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
All those things you dreamed you would do in retirement end up only filling 10% of your time.
Those grandiose plans you dreamed of when you retire cost a lot more than you thought.
Now that you dont work staying relevant in life aint so easy for some of us.
When dreaming of retirement i thought the wife and i would do a lot of traveling,the problem i never considered is she wont retire for another 10 years
While some retire and dont have enough hours in the day to do all their activities for others(like me) retirement becomes somewhat of a boring monotony.
Key point is that you need to fill a void. I returned from retirement to work because I missed being relevant. What I enjoy most about work is achieving great things and working with a team of very smart people. They need me and they appreciate my contributions. We have a lot of fun and we get paid for it.

So now I'm thinking about trying retirement again but this time I will make a plan. I am not going to just sit around. Perhaps I can work part time as a consultant. Two days a week would be enough to keep my mind active.
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Old 05-11-2015, 06:37 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,726,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
Key point is that you need to fill a void. I returned from retirement to work because I missed being relevant. What I enjoy most about work is achieving great things and working with a team of very smart people. They need me and they appreciate my contributions. We have a lot of fun and we get paid for it.

So now I'm thinking about trying retirement again but this time I will make a plan. I am not going to just sit around. Perhaps I can work part time as a consultant. Two days a week would be enough to keep my mind active.
Although I do not wish to return to full-time work, I can relate to what you're saying. I have discovered that I need some structure, some challenges, some sense of being appreciated by others and making a contribution. This is so even though I have very much enjoyed my additional free time, which I have used for some travelling, a lot more reading, and even participation in City-Data.

Reading this Retirement Forum has taught me that some retirees delight in ALL free time, and I say more power to them even though that wouldn't work for me.
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Old 05-11-2015, 09:44 AM
 
34,361 posts, read 41,436,735 times
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Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Although I do not wish to return to full-time work, I can relate to what you're saying. I have discovered that I need some structure, some challenges, some sense of being appreciated by others and making a contribution.

.
Thats about the size of it basically missing that sense of being an integral part of something everyday,
Unfortunately for me theres no option of going back to that company i worked for for 30+years, also after retirement i put in applications to about 60 companies from car wash and rentacar companies to golf courses and big box stores,not a single call back,i got the message loud and clear,you're over 60/ we dont want you/ enjoy your pension.
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