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Old 03-25-2010, 10:22 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 6,335,780 times
Reputation: 8127

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I pose this question from observations made reading the daily death notices in our local/regional newspaper.

Yesterday there were 8 with the following ages---

87
82
64
60
59
57
56
32


Although yesterday's is somewhat an abnormality, many days at least 1/3 are under 70.

Makes me wonder if all that talk of people living so long being the reason our SS is going broke is truly accurate or more hype than fact.
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Old 03-25-2010, 11:54 AM
 
4,876 posts, read 8,710,488 times
Reputation: 6193
Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
I pose this question from observations made reading the daily death notices in our local/regional newspaper.

Yesterday there were 8 with the following ages---

87
82
64
60
59
57
56
32


Although yesterday's is somewhat an abnormality, many days at least 1/3 are under 70.

Makes me wonder if all that talk of people living so long being the reason our SS is going broke is truly accurate or more hype than fact.
You need to understand that Obituary Notices are not mandatory. In fact, today, it cost to put notices in many paper; it was free years ago. So, many families choose not to even bother with the expense. In addition, with mobility of the population, people who die are only known by their immediate family and it would serve no purpose. In addition, death notices and obituaries do not necessarily reflect the same time frame. One can put a notice immediately in the paper or even wait weeks. Also, one paper does not reflect all the notices; there are many papers in an area. So, reading the paper is not going to give you good information.

Median is not going to give you much, nor would Mean. You would have to look closely at more statistical measures to get any importance from the data.

Livecontent
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Old 03-25-2010, 01:09 PM
 
9,807 posts, read 6,335,780 times
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I did not mention --obituary.
I mentioned--death notices

In my area, the regional newspaper publishes the --death notice--for every death the coroners reports and are published daily. The death notices are public record and ( in the newspaper) only list name, age, and town.

I realize that many people who get listed under--death notice--don't have an obituary published which is why I used--death notices.

More accurate.
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Old 03-25-2010, 02:05 PM
 
42,638 posts, read 46,451,578 times
Reputation: 13357
You need to look again. Many of those youger were proably on disabilty and hadn't paid much in. SS makes more when you live to 65 and keep eraning untill then then die in a couple of years not having a surviving spouse. If they have a surviving spouse the money keepsd going out.One3 of teh problems is SS is no longera supplement to retirement funds by private comp0any or savings really.
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Old 03-25-2010, 05:52 PM
 
9,807 posts, read 6,335,780 times
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I don't know the circumstances of every person in my area who dies between the ages of 55 and 65.

However, the ones I do know, not a single one was on SS disability.

Maybe cancer, heart attacks, and car wrecks only claim lives in my area and no where else in America( sarc)
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Old 03-25-2010, 06:47 PM
 
4,876 posts, read 8,710,488 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
I did not mention --obituary.
I mentioned--death notices

In my area, the regional newspaper publishes the --death notice--for every death the coroners reports and are published daily. The death notices are public record and ( in the newspaper) only list name, age, and town.

I realize that many people who get listed under--death notice--don't have an obituary published which is why I used--death notices.

More accurate.
Yes, you did say death notices. My apologies. I just never thought about that because I never saw death notices in a paper published by the coroner, just obituaries and funeral notices. It must be a only in very small areas and small newspapers that do that listing because they need something to fill the paper??? I do not really look for it, as it is not part of my daily life. Again, you are not going to get any significant statistical information from median data.

Livecontent
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Old 03-25-2010, 07:00 PM
 
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If a person was on Social Security Disability, it does not mean they died under that designation. For if they have been receiving benefits before age 65, then they are on Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). Once they pass age 65, the are no longer considered on SSDI and their status is changed to Social Security Retirement Insurance (SSRI). So if they die, after age 65 they would not been considered under death under SSDI designation. So, in essence people who die at an older age under social security may in fact paid little or nothing into the system, if they were on SSDI. Keep in mind some could have started disability as children and would never had the requirement of the minimum 10 years of contributions--so they paid nothing.

Who really knows if the data supplied by the government is hype or reality and if Social Security is going broke or not.

Livecontent
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Old 03-26-2010, 12:50 AM
 
Location: Bradenton, FL
2,049 posts, read 2,338,985 times
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I know what you mean....I assumed the average life expectancy was now in the mid- to late-80's (like, if someone dies at 82, you think they weren't THAT old), but then I see so many obituaries for folks in their 50's and 60's. An acquaintance of mine, aged 62, just died today in her sleep -- I guess it was a heart attack, don't know the cause yet. My cousin died last year of a heart attack at age 70....another friend dropped over at 58....not sure what the underlying medical problems were, but still, way too many people are dying before their time.
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Old 03-30-2010, 08:09 AM
 
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Life Expectancy Calculator
Actuarial Life Table


As you get older your age expectancy increases because all of those who have already passed are no longer in the calculation. Once you reach 62 you have a better shot at 82 than someone younger.
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Old 03-30-2010, 08:11 AM
 
23,837 posts, read 19,750,446 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
I pose this question from observations made reading the daily death notices in our local/regional newspaper.

Yesterday there were 8 with the following ages---

87
82
64
60
59
57
56
32


Although yesterday's is somewhat an abnormality, many days at least 1/3 are under 70.

Makes me wonder if all that talk of people living so long being the reason our SS is going broke is truly accurate or more hype than fact.
They report the people who have passed not the people still alive. If you saw that list you might go wow people are really living longer.
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