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Old 03-14-2015, 11:07 AM
 
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Longevity runs in my family, especially on my mother's side, but so does Alzheimers. The question of whether I will have Alzheimers is always in the back of my mind. For me, living longer is only beneficial as long as I remain cognitively and physically healthy.

Someone else touched on this- I also look at what type of world I want to live in and consider that when I look at the overall quality of life I want to lead. We have ruined our planet beyond the point of return; between the wholesale slaughter of non-domesticated wild animals to the point of near extinction, pollution that is ruining our soil, water, and air, and a society that appears largely wholly self-absorbed, self-interested, and materialistic, I am not at all sure that I want to see what life will look like when I am 100. I don't want to live in a world where the only surviving mountain gorillas and elephants are in zoos, where there aren't any more mountain forests to hike, in, open fields to watch the birds and butterflies, or where financial greed and self-interest have obliterated all the remaining pristine wilderness areas.

Maybe that seems bleak, but to me there is more to life than just living longer. I don't want to live long enough to see the type of future I fear we are creating for this planet and its people.
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Old 03-15-2015, 03:21 PM
mlb
 
Location: North Monterey County
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I have no interest in living well past the time my loved ones have gone and left before me - including my pets.

Making new loved ones is not easy.
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Old 03-15-2015, 03:40 PM
 
Location: NC
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What we "did better" was to have vaccines, and pharmaceuticals including antibiotics, and to move away from jobs with farm equipment and other heavy machinery. Having children be born in hospitals was a help as well.

Now we mostly worry about lung cancer, heart disease, obesity, and diabetes, plus a ridiculous amount of death by auto accidents. Today's big worries are to a certain degree preventable, although not in all cases of course.
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Old 03-15-2015, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Whereever we have our RV parked
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Actually, I think the boomers, as a whole, will live no longer than the WWII generation, and it could be even shorter lifespans. Yes we have less smoking, but our generation is fatter, more obesity, and are in general are less physically active. So in the long run, it will not really matter.
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Old 03-17-2015, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,967,079 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by augiedogie View Post
Actually, I think the boomers, as a whole, will live no longer than the WWII generation, and it could be even shorter lifespans. Yes we have less smoking, but our generation is fatter, more obesity, and are in general are less physically active. So in the long run, it will not really matter.
I think we screwed our immune systems by a lot of bad practices.
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Old 03-18-2015, 01:25 PM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,427 posts, read 1,664,703 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Waterlily View Post
From news reports I've seen they say the baby boomers are a lot more healthy than any generation before them. I don't know what we did that was so different.

Some estimate that we'll live longer as well. Now I've read some stuff that says we may all live into our 90s. Wouldn't that be something? What about the next generation?

At this rate we may not be considered to be older people but just middle aged.

I happened on to an article in the Atlantic entitled "WHy I Hope To Die At 75". It's well written and provides much food for thought. These two quotes stood out for me:

Quote:
Americans seem to be obsessed with exercising, doing mental puzzles, consuming various juice and protein concoctions, sticking to strict diets, and popping vitamins and supplements, all in a valiant effort to cheat death and prolong life as long as possible. This has become so pervasive that it now defines a cultural type: what I call the American immortal.
Quote:
... over the past 50 years, health care hasn’t slowed the aging process so much as it has slowed the dying process.

Last edited by jean_ji; 03-18-2015 at 02:23 PM..
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Old 03-18-2015, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Near a river
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I've read more than one researcher's findings that the restriction of calories as we age contributes to a longer life. Maybe that's more important than what we eat? Westerners do eat a lot and many seniors are not working it off.
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Old 03-19-2015, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,541 posts, read 17,535,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catsy girl View Post
living to be 100 has become more of a wish for many seniors, and with advancement in health care, preventive care, etc. this is more possible.

i have no interest in living that long or even into my nineties. it is becoming increasingly obvious that we have wrecked this planet, and the many posts on horrific weather, summer and winter, confirm this. i truly do not think there is any place, geographically, to hide from this. weather will continue to change and for most places, become more problematic, whether it be snow, ice, or hurricanes, flooding, tornadoes. i do not think any of these will end, but will continue with frequency and intensity. it's becoming more difficult to remember what a "normal" winter or summer was like. and no, i'm not a pessimist, but do consider myself a realist.

in addition to weather and climate, growing older and becoming very old-nineties- brings continual losses. most people who are that age often mention the many friends and relatives who are gone, and the few people who are left with whom they can share memories. as a geriatric social worker years ago, this was something i heard frequently.

so, at least at this point in my life, no thanks.

catsy girl
I don't know why people would have such a nihilistic attitude based on the climate. The climate is what it is. It is probably not going to change a great deal in the lifetime of anyone currently alive. Even if it does "worsen," I can't imagine wanting to die early because of it.
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Old 03-20-2015, 03:27 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,830 posts, read 4,944,472 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by augiedogie View Post
Actually, I think the boomers, as a whole, will live no longer than the WWII generation, and it could be even shorter lifespans. Yes we have less smoking, but our generation is fatter, more obesity, and are in general are less physically active. So in the long run, it will not really matter.
So we need to make a choice:

If you want to enjoy your retirement, avoid degenerative diseases by staying slim, fit, and eating the right things. A very big part of that is to avoid stress. Develop a social network where you contribute to others and have meaning in your life.

The ones who are under a lot of stress tend to smoke and over eat the wrong things. They become obese, sedentary, diabetic, isolated, and they die young.
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Old 03-20-2015, 05:11 AM
 
1,946 posts, read 2,711,399 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jean_ji View Post
I happened on to an article in the Atlantic entitled "WHy I Hope To Die At 75". It's well written and provides much food for thought. These two quotes stood out for me:
What a great article! Thanks so much for pointing it out!
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