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Old 03-21-2015, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Whereever we have our RV parked
8,786 posts, read 7,704,486 times
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If things continue on their current trend lines, people will not live as long, on average, as now, based on simple demographics. Its a well known fact that minorities like blacks and hispanics don't tend to live as long as Caucasian. As our nation continues, whites will gradually become a smaller percentage of the population. Its not hard to extrapolate and see that the result will be that the average life expectancy of all American's will decline.
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Old 03-21-2015, 05:42 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,932,349 times
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The real increase is better overall health from medical advancements; IMO. Now days one can get diagnostic test to catch problems before the get to critical stage. I certainly remember being a child and hearing a parents talk about someone we knew who had exploratory surgery and found advanced cancer etc. Physicals now days starting in the 40's go beyond anything our parents ever got. I know wife and I took full advantage of prevent tests fully paid for by our insurance last year.
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Old 03-22-2015, 03:21 AM
 
71,563 posts, read 71,730,589 times
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the fact we adding 1 year of life every 4 years now is amazing.
average life expectancy which is only the 1/2 way point has really climbed since 2000.


it certainly isn't the food we eat as americans are heavier than ever even with their fat free ,sugar free eating.

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Old 03-22-2015, 10:48 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,482,868 times
Reputation: 29071
Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
The real increase is better overall health from medical advancements; IMO. Now days one can get diagnostic test to catch problems before the get to critical stage. I certainly remember being a child and hearing a parents talk about someone we knew who had exploratory surgery and found advanced cancer etc. Physicals now days starting in the 40's go beyond anything our parents ever got. I know wife and I took full advantage of prevent tests fully paid for by our insurance last year.
Thankfully, Medicare is big on wellness and preventive measures.
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Old 03-22-2015, 11:03 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,482,868 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by augiedogie View Post
If things continue on their current trend lines, people will not live as long, on average, as now, based on simple demographics. Its a well known fact that minorities like blacks and hispanics don't tend to live as long as Caucasian. As our nation continues, whites will gradually become a smaller percentage of the population. Its not hard to extrapolate and see that the result will be that the average life expectancy of all American's will decline.
I think the longevity numbers for blacks may be skewed/driven by the early deaths due to gangs, street violence and ghetto living and genetic predispositions to heart disease and diabetes. However, most centenarians seem to be blacks. Go figure.
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Old 03-22-2015, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,371 posts, read 9,863,395 times
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Regarding the Atlantic article about not wanting to live beyond 75, retired Columbia professor, critic and author, Carolyn Heilbrun, felt the same. She planned to end her life at 70 while in full command of her faculties.

However, upon reaching 70, Heilbrun changed her mind. She was still enjoying life, still writing.

She wrote a book at this time called Last Gift of Time (a fine book, one of my favorites, worth your consideration). Amazon.com: The Last Gift of Time: Life Beyond Sixty (9780345422958): Carolyn G. Heilbrun: Books

However, at age 77, Heilbrun did take her life. She was not ill, not in pain, she just decided it was time.

From an article in The New Yorker about Heilbrun and her death:

"After their walk <her weekly walk through Central Park with her long-time friend>, Heilbrun returned to the apartment, to her reading, her e-mailing, her long talks with colleagues. By all accounts, she did not have an argument with anyone, nor did she contact any long-lost friends. But soon she was found dead, a plastic bag over her head. A note lay nearby: “The journey is over. Love to all.”The suicide of feminist Carolyn Heilbrun

During the walk Heilbrun told her friend she "felt sad." Her friend asked her about what? Heilbrun said "she felt sad about the universe."

Don't we all -- at times?
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Old 03-22-2015, 04:28 PM
 
Location: delaware
688 posts, read 864,549 times
Reputation: 2367
Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleDolphin View Post
Regarding the Atlantic article about not wanting to live beyond 75, retired Columbia professor, critic and author, Carolyn Heilbrun, felt the same. She planned to end her life at 70 while in full command of her faculties.

However, upon reaching 70, Heilbrun changed her mind. She was still enjoying life, still writing.

She wrote a book at this time called Last Gift of Time (a fine book, one of my favorites, worth your consideration). Amazon.com: The Last Gift of Time: Life Beyond Sixty (9780345422958): Carolyn G. Heilbrun: Books

However, at age 77, Heilbrun did take her life. She was not ill, not in pain, she just decided it was time.

From an article in The New Yorker about Heilbrun and her death:

"After their walk <her weekly walk through Central Park with her long-time friend>, Heilbrun returned to the apartment, to her reading, her e-mailing, her long talks with colleagues. By all accounts, she did not have an argument with anyone, nor did she contact any long-lost friends. But soon she was found dead, a plastic bag over her head. A note lay nearby: “The journey is over. Love to all.”The suicide of feminist Carolyn Heilbrun

During the walk Heilbrun told her friend she "felt sad." Her friend asked her about what? Heilbrun said "she felt sad about the universe."

Don't we all -- at times?


i loved the book, "the last gift of time", and a few years ago taught a course at u.de life long learning, based on this book. it was one of the most enjoyable courses i've taught, at least from my viewpoint, and students, about 25, really seemed to find it interesting and involving. i've taught it once more since then.


catsy girl
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Old 03-22-2015, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,579 posts, read 17,567,761 times
Reputation: 27661
Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleDolphin View Post
Regarding the Atlantic article about not wanting to live beyond 75, retired Columbia professor, critic and author, Carolyn Heilbrun, felt the same. She planned to end her life at 70 while in full command of her faculties.

However, upon reaching 70, Heilbrun changed her mind. She was still enjoying life, still writing.

She wrote a book at this time called Last Gift of Time (a fine book, one of my favorites, worth your consideration). Amazon.com: The Last Gift of Time: Life Beyond Sixty (9780345422958): Carolyn G. Heilbrun: Books

However, at age 77, Heilbrun did take her life. She was not ill, not in pain, she just decided it was time.

From an article in The New Yorker about Heilbrun and her death:

"After their walk <her weekly walk through Central Park with her long-time friend>, Heilbrun returned to the apartment, to her reading, her e-mailing, her long talks with colleagues. By all accounts, she did not have an argument with anyone, nor did she contact any long-lost friends. But soon she was found dead, a plastic bag over her head. A note lay nearby: “The journey is over. Love to all.”The suicide of feminist Carolyn Heilbrun

During the walk Heilbrun told her friend she "felt sad." Her friend asked her about what? Heilbrun said "she felt sad about the universe."

Don't we all -- at times?
We all feel sad from time to time and despair about the state of things. If you are reasonably healthy, have your faculties, and can do things you enjoy doing, why be so morbid? The relentless pessimism gets old.
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Old 03-22-2015, 07:19 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,371 posts, read 9,863,395 times
Reputation: 10243
Don't know if I'd call it pessimism, exactly..maybe more of a deep soul weariness of a world that seems hell-bent on destroying itself through the actions of human activity and greed.
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