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Old 06-22-2007, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
1,610 posts, read 4,394,420 times
Reputation: 1459

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Marlow - I think you hit the nail on the head when you said that you need "structure." I think that is precisely what keeps me working and wanting to work indefinitely. Getting up in the morning without a specific place to be would be a sure-fire way to turn me into a blithering idiot after a short period of time. Right now it's all about the money because I want to maximize my 401k contributions as well as my other savings and I want to finish making my "capital" purchases before we leave our current careers. But then I will work at just about anything to have that structure you mentioned.
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Old 06-23-2007, 10:29 AM
 
Location: The Great State of Arkansas
5,981 posts, read 16,327,576 times
Reputation: 7582
My husband says he will never retire - he's a pharmacist - unless his body or mind gives out on him. I hope that's true - his work is his life in many ways. True to being a pharmacist, he does require structure. I work from home, so all I'll be doing is turning the computer on a little less.

Since he doesn't want to retire and I do, we've decided to move mine up....it's the best of both worlds! I get to play and he gets to work and we are both EXTREMELY pleased with that plan!
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Old 06-25-2007, 05:50 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,691 posts, read 33,700,331 times
Reputation: 51914
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redrover View Post
Marlow - I think you hit the nail on the head when you said that you need "structure." I think that is precisely what keeps me working and wanting to work indefinitely. Getting up in the morning without a specific place to be would be a sure-fire way to turn me into a blithering idiot after a short period of time. Right now it's all about the money because I want to maximize my 401k contributions as well as my other savings and I want to finish making my "capital" purchases before we leave our current careers. But then I will work at just about anything to have that structure you mentioned.
I am a recent retiree who made a major move 6 weeks after I retired. So far, I'm pooped from being retired. No kidding, I'm more active without intention, than I was at work. I get up when the sun comes up and am dressed and ready to go out the door at 9:00A. I feel like I'm always on the go, now, whereas at work, I sat in front of a computer most of the day. You can find structure in retirement. Taking classes, joining clubs that meet in person, volunteering, for example, all involve a schedule (having to be someplace at a particular time). Until this past weekend, I was without my PC for 5 weeks, and got in a routine of going to the library for 2 hours per day to use the Internet there. I either went before or after a class.

Volunteering - If you aren't sure if volunteering is for you, look to volunteer for town events rather than volunteering for a particular organization. Your commitment is over when the event is over and if you decide you want to volunteer for another town event, you can probably do something different for that next event (so it doesn't feel like a job).
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Old 06-25-2007, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Bayside, NY
823 posts, read 3,375,218 times
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DCNative,

How old are you? When I was middleaged I said I would work at least until I was 70 then Mother Nature taught me that our bodies age even if our minds don't. Even though I had surgery I was forced to retire at 65 because of severe back problems . I am now almost 69 and happy to be retired.
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Old 06-25-2007, 11:43 PM
 
Location: Sequim, WA
786 posts, read 1,907,721 times
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I really think whether or not to retire...and when to retire is a very personal thing. Like LauraC, I'm a recent retiree. After 30 years with the federal government, including 19 in management, I had enough bureaucracy for a lifetime, and I retired right after turning age 55. Even though I was very busy throughout my career, like LauraC, I'm even busier now! I may have to retire from retirement to get some rest. For me, it's easy. Besides my career, I have always had a lot of hobbies and outside interests. I just don't get bored. However, I've known people who seem to focus on the job nearly 100 percent of the time, don't have hobbies or other interests. For them, retirement could be detrimental. Also, some people just love their jobs, and that's great. They probably should keep working as long. Most people need a lot of structure in their lives. A minority of people just keep "driving" themselves into new projects whether there is a structural demand or not. So...if you are eligible to retire and can afford to, I think you need to ask yourself just what you plan to do. And...if you don't know or the thought scares you, you just might keep working away until the answers become clear.
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Old 06-27-2007, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,492 posts, read 51,392,857 times
Reputation: 24613
When I retire I expect to do very little for a while and to "destructure" my life as much as possible. Some of this will involve a motorcycle and a map. Then I expect to write up the experiences and start telling stories. Might even try to sell them. One way or another I will use my retirement income to finance another income.

One idea that occurred to me was to set up a small machinery repair shop with a hardware section and a doughnut shop/café/bar attached. Should provide some income and some entertainment. If I am in the right section of the country I might use my environmental/geosciences background to do some prospecting.

Lots of ideas about stuff I would like to do that I have not done because of the need to spend time making a living. That will be a great relief.
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Old 06-28-2007, 08:21 AM
 
5,641 posts, read 17,316,834 times
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I likely will not completely retire either. I am in a field where I can freelance artwork so I will work until I can't do that anymore. And if I can't find work doing that I intend to sell stuff on ebay to supplement my income a little .
I have been putting into a 401K for years but I doubt it will ever be truly enough.
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Old 07-01-2007, 06:59 PM
 
450 posts, read 1,839,305 times
Reputation: 303
Wink Not everyone is defined by their job.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cdelena View Post
It really is different for each individual. I find that many that are totally happy and engrossed with what and how they make a living are reluctant to retire. And those with less desire and interest to invest time in other things want to continue working.

Although I took some satisfaction in accomplishments in my profession, I primarily worked for a salary. I enjoyed some people I worked with and tolerated others but was clear that we were all there for personal reasons.

Once I had a sound financial plan for my retirement I did so at 56. Continued work would have resulted in more money but at the cost of time not doing what I wanted to do.

I have been very happy in retirement, living where and how I want. I spend my time on the things I enjoy and have forgotten the deadlines, stress, and conflicts that were part of my job.

Each should follow their own path.
I agree completely. Those who work for themselves or are their own boss will naturally enjoy continuing to work. Most people work because they have to and get more personal satisfaction outside their jobs with family and other interests. I plan to volunteer alot--but will not miss the politics and stress
of my job.

Now, I say this in as kind a way as possible, but if you do not plan to retire there is no reason for you to post on a site dedicated to retirement--is there? We really don't need to hear from people almost "proudly" saying they will never retire when there are people that want to get good advice as to what to do and how to handle their retirement. Does that sound unkind? Forgive me, but I have just met so many self-employed or powerful professionals that do not understand that the average little guy just wants out at some point to enjoy their personal life. Once again, if you define yourself by your work, keep working. But for the rest of us here, we really don't want to hear about it.
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Old 07-04-2007, 09:09 AM
 
153 posts, read 1,166,910 times
Reputation: 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dingler View Post
I work in Human Resources for a very large employer, and have been involved in the recruitment of hundreds of people. I push for the managers to hire older workers but in general unless you are on the executive track it is nearly impossible to be hired when you are over 60. Those people who want to work past 65 better have some serious luck getting hired. Age discrimination is serious.
My employer values all of us in the 55+ age group so much that they are working on implementing a full-benefit plan for part-time employees! They don't want us to quit completely and hope to keep us there because of our work ethics and valuable experience.
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Old 07-04-2007, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,691 posts, read 33,700,331 times
Reputation: 51914
One thing a workaholic with no hobbies might think about is what is it about the job that they like and try to find that aspect of the job in a retirement related activity.

For example, if you liked learning new things in your job, then look for a place to retire to where you can attend classes of the caliber that would sustain your interest.

If you like decision-making or strategic planning, for example, try to get on some councils/boards/committees where you would be planning and making decisions for your new town or some charitable/social/political organization in the town.

If you liked meeting customers/the public in your job, in retirement, volunteer for a variety of town events (rather than organizations where you might see the same people all of the time) where you would have an opportunity to meet the public.

If you liked socializing with co-workers best, join a group that has an activity/hobby/skill you do (or a professional society) PLUS has a lot of social activities for members.

If you liked teaching training classes in your job, look for a town with a good retiree program where they might be interested in you teaching retirees what you know in your area of expertise.

If you liked the travel aspect of a job, look for a learning environment in retirement that combines learning with trips related to the course subject matter. For example, a class on 18th century England might include a trip to a museum to see art pieces from that period or a trip to a concert hall to hear musical selections from the period or a trip to a playhouse to see a show from that period.

If you liked problem solving, you could teach it or do it for an organization.

If you liked having a schedule, look for things to do that require you to be at a certain place at a certain time on a regular basis.

If you are a professional, retire to a place where there are other professionals in your field, so you can maintain your expertise with like-minded others. Do some research on this. For example, I live in an area with a lot of scientists. They have a society for scientists in the town that meets regularly. There are a lot of science-related classes in the school for retirees (learning and teaching opportunities). We have a retiree workshop right now that involves data collection and monitoring for some environmental study in addition to a class on the Nuclear Era. They've had a Quantum Mechanics class for retirees in the past. I think they mentor kids in science. The town has a science-related heritage that is noticeable in its fairs/festivals/events displays and activities. The town has an innovative bent. They have guest speakers who are scientists that speak at luncheons. The local newspaper stories report on scientific happenings and achievements both in the area workplaces and at the schools. We have a science museum.

Just some thoughts on how to translate what you like about the job to things you can do in retirement.
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