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Old 01-15-2015, 04:36 PM
 
1,207 posts, read 912,400 times
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Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
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I personally find cities where you have to drive most places undesirable. I find excitement in street life, walking everywhere, being able to explore different neighborhoods and always find something new. The ability to go to a jazz club one night, walk to dinner another night in an ethnic neighborhood and then walk to an urban park to see musicians perform. Essentially, I prefer the ability to explore and enjoy an urban environment on a larger scale than Rochester can offer.

....Plus, there are considerations around how far someone has to travel to an event/activity. I know as a teenager, I lived about 20 mins from downtown and I was bored frequently. Could I have found something to do across the entire metro? Sure, but I would have had to drive 20+ miles one way (add the winter weather in and it was more difficult). Plus, how many times can you go to the same place/event?
AJ, I definitely understand what you mean and there is no comparison to cities like NY or Chicago in this sense. And I especially know what you mean by a teenager living 20 minutes away. I was that teenager too who drove into the city every weekend. And at the time, Rochester had about 5 night clubs. I could only go to the same clubs so many times and I never explored the city. I think as a whole, many who live in the suburbs today don't really explore the city, but I would say it's a completely different city than when I was a teenager. About 4 years ago I started rediscovering the city doing exactly those things you mention. There's a good at least 25 night clubs now. (not counting bars and restaurants too). Counting all bars and restaurants, there's at least a hundred clubs/restaurants/bars to go any weekend night. I can't even imagine what that would have been like when I was that young. Luckily though, many of the bars also having dining rooms and the restaurants cater to all age groups so I've loved being older now and being able to go to these places.

But for urban neighborhoods, Rochester has a good 7 very walkable urban neighborhoods. The East End, South Wedge, Park Ave, Monroe Ave, Neighborhood of the Arts, CollegeTown and St. Paul/High Falls. It's funny because for the 4 years I've been going downtown now I've been discovering new things. There's also gorges right in the middle of the city down the Genesee River and 2 falls going right through the city. So there's a lot of neat things to discover in the city. Again, I definitely understand it's not NYC, but I do believe it has a lot more urban discoverability/neighborhoods that perhaps it gets credit for.
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Old 01-15-2015, 05:02 PM
 
56,544 posts, read 80,847,919 times
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Originally Posted by db2797 View Post
AJ, I definitely understand what you mean and there is no comparison to cities like NY or Chicago in this sense. And I especially know what you mean by a teenager living 20 minutes away. I was that teenager too who drove into the city every weekend. And at the time, Rochester had about 5 night clubs. I could only go to the same clubs so many times and I never explored the city. I think as a whole, many who live in the suburbs today don't really explore the city, but I would say it's a completely different city than when I was a teenager. About 4 years ago I started rediscovering the city doing exactly those things you mention. There's a good at least 25 night clubs now. (not counting bars and restaurants too). Counting all bars and restaurants, there's at least a hundred clubs/restaurants/bars to go any weekend night. I can't even imagine what that would have been like when I was that young. Luckily though, many of the bars also having dining rooms and the restaurants cater to all age groups so I've loved being older now and being able to go to these places.

But for urban neighborhoods, Rochester has a good 7 very walkable urban neighborhoods. The East End, South Wedge, Park Ave, Monroe Ave, Neighborhood of the Arts, CollegeTown and St. Paul/High Falls. It's funny because for the 4 years I've been going downtown now I've been discovering new things. There's also gorges right in the middle of the city down the Genesee River and 2 falls going right through the city. So there's a lot of neat things to discover in the city. Again, I definitely understand it's not NYC, but I do believe it has a lot more urban discoverability/neighborhoods that perhaps it gets credit for.
What about around South Clinton and South Goodman where the Swillburg and Highland Park neighborhoods meet?

I also understand how if you are a suburban teen, that you may not know that much about the city outside of what is seen on the news or from going to select events/places. Many times you don't realize certain things are in the city or area until later in life. So, it could be a matter of limited access/exposure/information versus being bored or thinking there isn't anything to do.
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Old 01-15-2015, 05:09 PM
 
1,207 posts, read 912,400 times
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Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
What about around South Clinton and South Goodman where the Swillburg and Highland Park neighborhoods meet?
Ahh right...those slipped my mind completely. And South Clinton especially is very ethnic and Swillburg having a long, long history from immigrant Germans moving to that part of the city.
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Old 01-15-2015, 07:12 PM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
5,311 posts, read 5,328,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by db2797 View Post
AJ, I definitely understand what you mean and there is no comparison to cities like NY or Chicago in this sense. And I especially know what you mean by a teenager living 20 minutes away. I was that teenager too who drove into the city every weekend. And at the time, Rochester had about 5 night clubs. I could only go to the same clubs so many times and I never explored the city. I think as a whole, many who live in the suburbs today don't really explore the city, but I would say it's a completely different city than when I was a teenager. About 4 years ago I started rediscovering the city doing exactly those things you mention. There's a good at least 25 night clubs now. (not counting bars and restaurants too). Counting all bars and restaurants, there's at least a hundred clubs/restaurants/bars to go any weekend night. I can't even imagine what that would have been like when I was that young. Luckily though, many of the bars also having dining rooms and the restaurants cater to all age groups so I've loved being older now and being able to go to these places.

But for urban neighborhoods, Rochester has a good 7 very walkable urban neighborhoods. The East End, South Wedge, Park Ave, Monroe Ave, Neighborhood of the Arts, CollegeTown and St. Paul/High Falls. It's funny because for the 4 years I've been going downtown now I've been discovering new things. There's also gorges right in the middle of the city down the Genesee River and 2 falls going right through the city. So there's a lot of neat things to discover in the city. Again, I definitely understand it's not NYC, but I do believe it has a lot more urban discoverability/neighborhoods that perhaps it gets credit for.
I respect this and I'm thankful that more places in the US are improving to expand the offering of walkable options in many metros. I think for most folks with or without children, Rochester offers a whole lot and that you can find what you want if you look for it.

My wife and I (35 - 40 years old) live in South Philly now and we planned it out for many years. Having a place where we can walk everywhere (no car), have transit, a wide array of real amenities (not just boutiques), tight urban community, and a travel hub with direct flights was where we set our sights. It's not everyone's priority, but it is something smaller cities just can't compete with. As you mentioned, there's no comparison, but that doesn't marginalize Rochester at all in my eyes. It just makes it something different. That's why these types of threads fail IMO, because most people can't admit that there are different priorities by different types of people. I recognize that you're aware of this. Remember that Rory poster, who couldn't put into perspective that just because he liked warmer weather and found a city that he preferred, that somehow others couldn't possibly prefer Rochester? How sad to be so devoid of empathy and self-evaluation.
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Old 01-15-2015, 07:33 PM
 
56,544 posts, read 80,847,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
I respect this and I'm thankful that more places in the US are improving to expand the offering of walkable options in many metros. I think for most folks with or without children, Rochester offers a whole lot and that you can find what you want if you look for it.

My wife and I (35 - 40 years old) live in South Philly now and we planned it out for many years. Having a place where we can walk everywhere (no car), have transit, a wide array of real amenities (not just boutiques), tight urban community, and a travel hub with direct flights was where we set our sights. It's not everyone's priority, but it is something smaller cities just can't compete with. As you mentioned, there's no comparison, but that doesn't marginalize Rochester at all in my eyes. It just makes it something different. That's why these types of threads fail IMO, because most people can't admit that there are different priorities by different types of people. I recognize that you're aware of this. Remember that Rory poster, who couldn't put into perspective that just because he liked warmer weather and found a city that he preferred, that somehow others couldn't possibly prefer Rochester? How sad to be so devoid of empathy and self-evaluation.
Great and spot on post!

South Philly is perfect given what you mentioned. I think the closest thing in Upstate NY that would fit this are the neighborhoods in Buffalo west of Main Street to about just west of Elmwood, give or take. With that said, even that area isn't exact.

I think the most affordable city/area that could fulfill that criteria is Cleveland. Lakewood gets mentioned a lot on here and I believe it is dense enough to where the kids in the school district largely walk to school(only 100 of its 5800 students use a school bus, which is primarily for special needs students).

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 01-15-2015 at 07:47 PM..
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Old 01-15-2015, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
5,311 posts, read 5,328,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Great and spot on post!

South Philly is perfect given what you mentioned. I think the closest thing in Upstate NY that would fit this are the neighborhoods in Buffalo west of Main Street to about just west of Elmwood, give or take. With that said, even that area isn't exact.

I think the most affordable city/area that could fulfill that criteria is Cleveland. Lakewood gets mentioned a lot on here and I believe it is dense enough to where the kids in the school district largely walk to school(only 100 of its 5800 students use a school bus, which is primarily for special needs students).
My wife lived around Elmwood when we first started dating. Very nice areas around there to Main St, as you mentioned. She also lived on Hertel and loved it. I'm also interested in seeing Albany sometime. I was there a long time ago, but there are some row house neighborhoods that seem pretty appealing. It's always hard to see how functional a neighborhood is until you visit. One thing I hated about Richmond VA was that even though the build was pretty solid regarding walkability and mixed-use, it was far too boutique-y. You still had to get in a car to go get groceries in most cases because in most neighborhoods, the only thing nearby was an overpriced clothier or expensive restaurant (or food desert).

I need to check-out Cleveland sometime. I've never been there, but I hear so many good things. I'll be sure to look into Lakewood too. Thanks for the information!
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Old 01-15-2015, 11:25 PM
 
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I agree with ckhthankgod...right on with your assessment AJ. I do remember who you are referring to. Thinking that somehow a "cold" climate means people don't want to live there is pure ignorance. And everybody's preferences are different. I like Rochester because it has some big city amenities and entertainment but is small enough that you can be a bigger fish in a smaller pond. Others like the pure experience of a full-on big city. And others prioritize weather as their most important factor. Everybody is different. So great post.
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Old 01-16-2015, 06:42 AM
 
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Just as I was looking on this website for another thread, I found this interesting list: 12 Cities Where You Can Live Affordably in a Walkable Neighborhood - Walk Score Blog
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Old 01-16-2015, 06:54 AM
 
351 posts, read 240,286 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
What about around South Clinton and South Goodman where the Swillburg and Highland Park neighborhoods meet?
This area is definitely starting to take off, can't wait for the bar/arcade/burger joint to open up over there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I also understand how if you are a suburban teen, that you may not know that much about the city outside of what is seen on the news or from going to select events/places. Many times you don't realize certain things are in the city or area until later in life. So, it could be a matter of limited access/exposure/information versus being bored or thinking there isn't anything to do.
I understand this point of view, grew up in Greece and really had no idea what the city itself had to offer outside of Amerks/Red Wings games. Wasn't until I came back after college and moved just outside the city that I realized how much there is to do downtown. Could never see myself moving back to the burbs at this point.
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Old 03-28-2015, 08:02 PM
 
155 posts, read 185,638 times
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Hate Rochester all over. Glad I am gone.
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