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Old 05-18-2008, 03:24 PM
 
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I-90 goes through Cheektowaga...but Cheektowaga is a close in suburb of Buffalo and centrally located in the metro. I-90 is definitely furthest removed from the central area of the metro in Rochester than in any of the other upstate metros. It goes through the southern portion of Henrietta, which while a major suburb, is sort of on the southern fringe of the east-westerly sprawling metro area. The majority of the Rochester urban area lies north of I-90 to the point where it really isn't considred a major route to travel within the area. Seeing as it is a toll road, I really don't mind this much and am fine using 390, 490, and 590.
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Old 05-18-2008, 08:52 PM
 
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Originally Posted by I'minformed2 View Post
I-90 goes through Cheektowaga...but Cheektowaga is a close in suburb of Buffalo and centrally located in the metro. I-90 is definitely furthest removed from the central area of the metro in Rochester than in any of the other upstate metros. It goes through the southern portion of Henrietta, which while a major suburb, is sort of on the southern fringe of the east-westerly sprawling metro area. The majority of the Rochester urban area lies north of I-90 to the point where it really isn't considred a major route to travel within the area.
Exactly. Thank you.

Quote:
Seeing as it is a toll road, I really don't mind this much and am fine using 390, 490, and 590.
In Albany we don't pay tolls on 90. Is it not the same in other cities?
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Old 05-19-2008, 05:15 AM
 
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Originally Posted by juppiter View Post
In Albany we don't pay tolls on 90. Is it not the same in other cities?
This is also true in Buffalo. Everywhere else does pay tolls on I-90. However, I would argue that Albany does pay tolls on the Thruway and 90 is not the Thruway where it is toll-free through Albany, so really Buffalo is the only city that does not pay tolls on the Thruway. 90 through Albany is the equivalent of 290 in Buffalo, 490 in Rochester, 690 in Syracuse, etc.
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Old 05-21-2008, 06:26 PM
 
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It really doesn't matter that 90 doesn't go through the city because 490 has essentially rectified that situation.
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Old 05-21-2008, 06:40 PM
 
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...exactly. And with no tolls!
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Old 05-22-2008, 08:45 PM
 
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The original concept of the Thruway a fast highway BETWEEN cities, not through them. That's why it doesn't start in NYC, it starts in the burbs, and why it doesn't enter the city limits of most of the upstate cities. I 'm not positive, but I think the Thruway pre-dates the interstate system. It was built solely with state funds and toll revenues. You'll notice that its exits are much farther apart than on other Interstate highways. Rochester, the 3rd largest city in the state, only had 2 exits! They weren't trying to provide access at every cross highway or town.

It was a shame that they wound up building the interstates through the middle of cities. I'm old enough to remember when they rammed the Outer Loop through my neighborhood. The Inner Loop, instead of being downtown's savior, became its noose.
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Old 05-22-2008, 09:18 PM
 
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For sure, the Inner Loop needs to be torn down. It's kinda neat, but it definitely strangles downtown.

And yes, New York State funded its own Thruway. Unfortunately, it then also had to fund the highways in every other state. Very unfair.
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Old 10-12-2008, 09:41 PM
 
Location: near the Southern Tier
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Default Ben has it

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Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
The original concept of the Thruway a fast highway BETWEEN cities, not through them. That's why it doesn't start in NYC, it starts in the burbs, and why it doesn't enter the city limits of most of the upstate cities. I 'm not positive, but I think the Thruway pre-dates the interstate system. It was built solely with state funds and toll revenues. You'll notice that its exits are much farther apart than on other Interstate highways. Rochester, the 3rd largest city in the state, only had 2 exits! They weren't trying to provide access at every cross highway or town.

It was a shame that they wound up building the interstates through the middle of cities. I'm old enough to remember when they rammed the Outer Loop through my neighborhood. The Inner Loop, instead of being downtown's savior, became its noose.
Ben's right. The NYS Thruway pre-dates the interstate system, younger than only the Pennsylvania Turnpike, which dates from the 1940's (and was built, in places, on an unused railroad route).

Ever notice the mile markers? The entire interstate system numbers the miles of each state starting in the west and increasing as you travel east. NYS Thruway numbers from its theoretical "starting point", New York City, as the New York Central did.

The Thruway (and all other interstates, in theory) was built as a limited access highway fashioned after Hitler's Autobahn. General Eisenhower was said to have been awed by the military applications and necessity of Germany's highway transportation system. He recognized a military need for something similar (which brought civilian benefits along with it). Once he became president, the interstate highway system enjoyed a high priority.

Once New York and Pennsylvania built their early superhighways the Federal government got the interstate fever and building raged. Individual states influenced designs and costs and the original traits (limited access and military necessity) were lost or watered down. These roads weren't intended to replace the existing Federal and State highway systems, but to supplement them with a faster, more direct option.

The Thruway was purposely built around cities. When it bypassed Rochester, Henrietta wasn't considered a suburb. Actually, I think the term suburb didn't quite exist then! Any of you Rochesterians remember when the Thruway entrance/exit was on West Henrietta Road (NY15)? In Buffalo it was built along the edge of the then-populated area...remember, that was 50+ years ago, more when the planning was done.

Exits were recognzed as safety concerns and were purposely placed 15 to 20 miles apart, or more. Exits are costly to build and encourage(d) local traffic to exit hop, not one of the original purposes of such a system. And if anyone out there has ever used the interstate system commercially, you come to value the limited nature of local access in NY. Ramps every mile or two (while two lane roads nearby are empty) do severely impede traffic wanting to cover 600, 800, or 1,000 miles in a day.

Last edited by MuddyAxles; 10-12-2008 at 09:45 PM.. Reason: left out sumpin'
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Old 01-08-2009, 03:40 PM
 
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As others have stated, I-90 is a city bypass highway for getting across the state.

It's not a mystery why there's no tolls on "the 90" in Buffalo (or Cheektowaga, rather--no, it doesn't run through the city). This is because it's used for commuting (traffic backs up every morning and evening around the blue water tower, the beginning of 290).

I think if I-90 was used by a plurality of Rochester commuters they'd have a good chance of lobbying for the removal of tolls. But it's not.
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Old 01-08-2009, 03:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MuddyAxles View Post
And if anyone out there has ever used the interstate system commercially, you come to value the limited nature of local access in NY. Ramps every mile or two (while two lane roads nearby are empty) do severely impede traffic wanting to cover 600, 800, or 1,000 miles in a day.
This is a good point. The way I-90 bounces through Cleveland is ridiculous. And don't try to use it as way to get through Chicago.
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