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Old 02-05-2007, 02:24 PM
 
266 posts, read 1,100,030 times
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Anyone have any personal experience with this private school in Rochester, or heard anything good or bad about it? It sounds just wonderful from the website - I am considering sending my children there.
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Old 02-17-2007, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Rochester, NY
3 posts, read 10,395 times
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..PLEASE DO NOT SEND YOUR CHILDREN THERE.

The school is horrible. I went there for four years in the 90's. The teachers show no discipline to the students, and they barely know what they're trying to teach. It is in no way worth the money.
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Old 02-18-2007, 04:22 AM
 
27 posts, read 163,962 times
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There is a member of this forum who also lives in the general Rochester area, IMINFORMED is his handle. He can probably dig up some info for you I would imagine.
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Old 02-18-2007, 07:19 AM
 
5,265 posts, read 14,905,266 times
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I actually don't live in Rochester right now and haven't for 12 years...I live in NC. Moving back to Rochester in the near future though. I have to say though, unfortunetly I'm really not familiar with Cobblestone school. To be completely honest, I don't think I've ever even heard of it.
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Old 02-18-2007, 03:29 PM
 
266 posts, read 1,100,030 times
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Oh boy, Melleh17, sounds like you had a bad experience, which I'm sorry to hear. I'm glad you said something, though... I know there are good public schools around, but I liked the sound of the arts-focused education at Cobblestone.

Can you elaborate on what went wrong when you were there?

And I guess it must not have that great a reputation if I'm informed hasn't heard of it, because she knows a lot about the Rochester area...

I will probably stick to the public schools!
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Old 02-20-2007, 11:37 AM
 
3 posts, read 10,044 times
Reputation: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitty71 View Post
Oh boy, Melleh17, sounds like you had a bad experience, which I'm sorry to hear. I'm glad you said something, though... I know there are good public schools around, but I liked the sound of the arts-focused education at Cobblestone.

Can you elaborate on what went wrong when you were there?

And I guess it must not have that great a reputation if I'm informed hasn't heard of it, because she knows a lot about the Rochester area...

I will probably stick to the public schools!
i have some experience with cobblestone. i also was very impressed with the mission statement. i lived next door to the school ,the teachers and staff semed very flexiable and open minded.the school did seem kind of haphazard and loose . but the kids did have alot of fun with their education .the public schools in rochester are really versitile. science and arts are still valid in this school district , check out edison tech and the school of arts (high schools)
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Old 02-20-2007, 04:05 PM
 
5,265 posts, read 14,905,266 times
Reputation: 4239
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitty71 View Post
Oh boy, Melleh17, sounds like you had a bad experience, which I'm sorry to hear. I'm glad you said something, though... I know there are good public schools around, but I liked the sound of the arts-focused education at Cobblestone.

Can you elaborate on what went wrong when you were there?

And I guess it must not have that great a reputation if I'm informed hasn't heard of it, because she knows a lot about the Rochester area...

I will probably stick to the public schools!
haha....i'm male. I realize men are the minority on this forum...but there are a few of us.
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Old 02-21-2007, 05:42 AM
 
266 posts, read 1,100,030 times
Reputation: 108
Default whoops!

oh, sorry

for some silly reason I thought you were a woman - I've read enough of your posts, too!

hey, take it as a compliment
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Old 02-21-2007, 05:45 AM
 
266 posts, read 1,100,030 times
Reputation: 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by kgomarra View Post
i have some experience with cobblestone. i also was very impressed with the mission statement. i lived next door to the school ,the teachers and staff semed very flexiable and open minded.the school did seem kind of haphazard and loose . but the kids did have alot of fun with their education .the public schools in rochester are really versitile. science and arts are still valid in this school district , check out edison tech and the school of arts (high schools)
Yes, I liked the mission statement as well - and I certainly like the flexible and open-minded aspect... I suppose I would be concerned if the teachers aren't as qualified as they should be, which is what is indicated by Melleh17.

Thanks for the other suggestions, of course, these are still early days for us as the kids will be in 1st and 2nd grades next year. I know that the school of the arts is very well known.
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Old 03-20-2007, 02:01 PM
 
1 posts, read 5,124 times
Reputation: 12
Lightbulb Cobblestone School of Today

Time out! Let's focus on the Cobblestone School (CS) of today. The truth is that CS has evolved tremendously over its 24 year history, and continues to do so, as does progressive educational thought garnered from around the world, along with the refinement to practice of its progressive approaches.

Allow me to clarify a few misconceptions expressed previously by others in this thread. All the teachers at the CS of today are certified (this was far from the case when the school was founded in a single basement room of a local church, and during many of its early years). CS graduates currently attend many selective colleges, including Harvard, MIT (three in one class, currently), Princeton, Tufts, Middlebury, and Geneseo. Another recent CS grad is attending the Univ. of Dubuque (Iowa) to study aviation (I guess Ivy League schools still don't offer that sort of instruction).

CS is not just a Montessori "franchise", or a Waldorf "franchise", but a unique living synthesis of all the great progressive educational thinkers. As such CS has tried many, many approaches; and quite frankly, has rejected many (if not most) in a never-ending search for what really works for our children. I have spoken with parents of CS students from 10-15 years ago, and in many ways can not believe we are speaking about the same school. Much of what they relate, in fact, resembles what Melleh17 has described previously. CS had undergone explosive growth and the infrastructure to deliver the program clearly was not present. And, while I can't personally speak to that period (90's), the school appears to have experimented with something like a "Free" or "Democratic" model of learning in which the students chose much/all of what they studied. I think that history has shown that many of these hippie-like things lack rigor and are not sustainable. A recent CS Director commented that curriculum is an adult responsibility, while the themes for integrated study, which are infused with many academic skills/subjects, should be chosen by the students to build interest/ownership. And so I think if Melleh17 were to visit CS today he/she would find that as a parent of a 90's student has said to me, "It seems that CS has finally grown to be the school we had all wished it to be."

OK, so I'm happy (really happy for my two sons who are in their 3rd and 6th years at CS), I think kitty71 will be happy and Melleh17 would be stunned by a visit to CS today. So what's wrong with the traditional (public) classroom setting? Here are some general observations. At a 20-30 to 1 student to teacher ratio, the teacher has no option but to prepare one lesson plan for all 20-30 students. This one lesson plan is guaranteed to be either too fast or too slow paced to maintain a deep interest with a majority of the students. The large class size also makes it impossible to even think of consulting the students on what subjects (themes) should be studied, nor surveying in depth their thoughts/feelings, etc. among 20-30 people. Therefore this one size-fits-all lesson plan must be restricted to superficial facts. Then, the traditional classroom system resorts to accusing the students of being "undisciplined" for showing little interest in often inappropriately paced, superficial studies of subjects of very little interest to them, the choice of which they were never consulted. So students are forced to sit still on uncomfortable seating and regurgitate facts under threat of punishment of receiving a bad formal grade (test score). Is this education? What parent would want their child subjected to this kind of treatment? How much educating can be achieved when students are so minimally engaged? Is there any question that students in traditional classrooms are minimally engaged? Parents are historically barred from attending traditional classroom sessions because their presence would be "disruptive". You might protest that you do not intend to speak nor gesture wildly, so why is it that your mere presence is "disruptive" if not for the fact the students in a traditional classroom setting are minimally engaged, craving stimulation to the point of seeking distraction of any kind? I know, I've been there and done that, as a survivor of a public school system. We were not engaged nor respected (just regimented and threatened for the most part).

So are traditional classroom teachers bad people because in their line of work they are non-engaging of students and disrespectful of both students and parents? I think not, they are good people caught up in a very bad system. Experience has shown that at more than about 12 students per class it is impossible to deliver anything but the sad product that traditional classrooms have always provided. Another sad occurrence is that most private schools graced with smaller classroom sizes opt to merely drill in still more superficial facts or drill these superficial facts in deeper, then quickly thereafter conduct a self-serving factual test to declare their students ahead of grade level (?). Is this the type of education parents really seek when paying private school tuition?

And so I invite you to put this declaration to the test and visit the CS of today at 10 Prince Street, Rochester, N.Y. at anytime and see a living community truely engaged in learning. I am totally confident the CS students will ignore your otherwise "disruptive" presence. I have found the best teachers are invariably the best discipliners (to instill self-discipline) and am frequently astonished by the array of often seamless techniques that CS faculty have mastered. By all means stay until you are satisfied you have seen how discipline is dispensed. I find CS visits to be both enriching and liberating.

To Melleh17: I can only say I'm sorry that it took so long to refine this very unique alternative approach to education. There may been some hard bumps on the way. Maria Montessori described her mid 19th century alternative to Catholic education as follows: "Ours was a house for children, rather than a real school. We had prepared a place for children where a diffused culture could be assimilated without any direct instruction."

At CS, we are Montessori & more ... a whole lot more.

Last edited by CS_Today; 03-20-2007 at 03:07 PM..
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