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Old 07-02-2010, 03:56 PM
 
1,166 posts, read 1,603,663 times
Reputation: 1160

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Hey all!

Just would like to get some insight on basic vet skills. I live out in the country not far from a small town. I have a cat. I love him but he continually gets into fights with raccoons. I've been getting rid of the raccoons but my bruiser of a cat still comes home with wounds from fighting.

One time he had a puncture wound on his forehead where the raccoon had my cats' head in its mouth. Of course the wound festered and developed an abscess. Had to take him to the vet check all his shots, get him cleaned out and stitched up. All that cost over two GRAND!
Now he (the cat) has gone and gotten himself a puncture wound on his right shoulder....all the way through the skin. The wound probably won't heal and surely will get infected. I've got anti-biotic topical and oral meds and have got through training in stitching up wounds (military time) but have never tried it on a (erstwhile) domestic cat. The puncture could use one perhaps two stitches, enough to close it but still let it drain.

I may end up taking him to the vet anyway but I want to try to save some money....and learn how to do some of these things myself....

Any input?


Thanks!
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Old 07-02-2010, 04:45 PM
 
24,841 posts, read 32,887,308 times
Reputation: 11471
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Cells View Post
Hey all!

Just would like to get some insight on basic vet skills. I live out in the country not far from a small town. I have a cat. I love him but he continually gets into fights with raccoons. I've been getting rid of the raccoons but my bruiser of a cat still comes home with wounds from fighting.

One time he had a puncture wound on his forehead where the raccoon had my cats' head in its mouth. Of course the wound festered and developed an abscess. Had to take him to the vet check all his shots, get him cleaned out and stitched up. All that cost over two GRAND!
Now he (the cat) has gone and gotten himself a puncture wound on his right shoulder....all the way through the skin. The wound probably won't heal and surely will get infected. I've got anti-biotic topical and oral meds and have got through training in stitching up wounds (military time) but have never tried it on a (erstwhile) domestic cat. The puncture could use one perhaps two stitches, enough to close it but still let it drain.

I may end up taking him to the vet anyway but I want to try to save some money....and learn how to do some of these things myself....

Any input?


Thanks!
You will just have to decide what means the most to you. Your cat or your money.

Are there any veterinary schools near??
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Old 07-02-2010, 09:43 PM
 
Location: Manhattan, Ks
1,280 posts, read 6,251,908 times
Reputation: 1808
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Cells View Post
Hey all!

Just would like to get some insight on basic vet skills. I live out in the country not far from a small town. I have a cat. I love him but he continually gets into fights with raccoons. I've been getting rid of the raccoons but my bruiser of a cat still comes home with wounds from fighting.

One time he had a puncture wound on his forehead where the raccoon had my cats' head in its mouth. Of course the wound festered and developed an abscess. Had to take him to the vet check all his shots, get him cleaned out and stitched up. All that cost over two GRAND!
Now he (the cat) has gone and gotten himself a puncture wound on his right shoulder....all the way through the skin. The wound probably won't heal and surely will get infected. I've got anti-biotic topical and oral meds and have got through training in stitching up wounds (military time) but have never tried it on a (erstwhile) domestic cat. The puncture could use one perhaps two stitches, enough to close it but still let it drain.

I may end up taking him to the vet anyway but I want to try to save some money....and learn how to do some of these things myself....

Any input?


Thanks!
I've been a vet tech for 10 years. I would never try to stitch up an animal without anesthetic. I'd imagine your kitty may need some more extensive work than you can tell by just looking. A good flushing may be in order along with some drain tubes. It takes more than a couple of stitches and a few days of antibiotics, generally. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news. But IMHO, it will cost your kitty more suffering and you even more $$$$ in the long run if you wait and try to deal with it yourself. I could be wrong, maybe it will be fine, but experience tells me otherwise.

Is there any way your kitty could be happy indoors? It sounds like it's a rough neighborhood for him.
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Old 07-03-2010, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Midvale, Idaho
1,568 posts, read 2,434,493 times
Reputation: 1967
Sorry I did not see this sooner. Tablespoon of salt dissolved in quart warm water and soak this wound as often as possible. I know it sounds like it would be painful to put salt water into a wound. At this dilution it is the same as the salt in his or your system and does not burn. I have healed many infected places on my animals with this solution. I even slipped with the phillips screw bit on the drill and drilled through my hand leaving a nasty hole. No problem getting it healed with the salt water.

It usually is best not to sew up puncture wounds. What ever made the puncture has likely drug something nasty inside. Also DO NOT NOT NOT use peroxide. It will kill off good skin cells. It is never good to put into a wound.

Ask your vet if he will sell you some Amoxycillin or what ever brand name of Ampicillin he carries. You can buy it on line in a powdered form to keep on hand for next time.

Finally we had a kitty that was in constant fights. I was like you spending way too much money with his injuries. I bought a 10 by 10 chain link kennel. I put it against the house, in front of a window,with one side of the kennel covering the top. Added chicken wire to finish off the top.

Then I put a small pet door in the window and did what I had to to make it work. Now kitty can go in and out as he chooses to enjoy the outside but can not get out of the kennel and get hurt. Yes he was pissed at first but his safety comes first. The cost of the kennel and pet door was about the same cost as one vet visit. Kennel 250 dollars and change for chicken wire. I used J clamps to hold it to the chain link.
Pyle Meadows - Moving in Pet door in window.

Pyle Meadows - Yard 2009 Kitty kennel. We had just moved in to a bare yard when this was taken in 2008.

It is not too late to start on that salt water. You need to do it at least twice a day. Three times would be better. I use paper towels dipped in the salt water then toss them and use a new one each soaking session.

Chris
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Old 07-03-2010, 09:49 AM
 
178 posts, read 482,424 times
Reputation: 146
After a wound costing two grand and then another puncture wound, I'd definitely put an end to kitty's irresponsible free-roaming days before I'd take up vet tech training.
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Old 07-03-2010, 10:15 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,685,341 times
Reputation: 8170
There was a farmer on my friend's can milk route ( 1960's) who seemed to always be operating on some animal. Ruptured hogs, cows with twisted stomachs.

He proudly stated he never needed a vet called out to his farm.

My friend asked his 2 teen sons ( not too bright, they were) if their dad was successful in his operations.

The son replied " some times. not too often though "
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Old 07-03-2010, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Midvale, Idaho
1,568 posts, read 2,434,493 times
Reputation: 1967
This is what made me get the kennel. What does not show here is one of his ears is split in half too. there has not been any more pain for the little guy since the kennel came into our lives. He can even spend warm nights out there and does as he chooses. Please do this for your kitty. This is after the vet took care of him. All four legs bandaged. He was not happy at all. Chris
Attached Thumbnails
Basic Veterinary skills.-10-3-07-ralph.jpg  
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Old 07-06-2010, 01:21 PM
 
Location: The mountians of Northern California.
1,354 posts, read 5,804,062 times
Reputation: 1301
Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
There was a farmer on my friend's can milk route ( 1960's) who seemed to always be operating on some animal. Ruptured hogs, cows with twisted stomachs.

He proudly stated he never needed a vet called out to his farm.

My friend asked his 2 teen sons ( not too bright, they were) if their dad was successful in his operations.

The son replied " some times. not too often though "
LOL We know a person like that in our neck of the woods.
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Old 07-06-2010, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,308 posts, read 34,863,208 times
Reputation: 7103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Cells View Post
Hey all!

Just would like to get some insight on basic vet skills. I live out in the country not far from a small town. I have a cat. I love him but he continually gets into fights with raccoons. I've been getting rid of the raccoons but my bruiser of a cat still comes home with wounds from fighting.

One time he had a puncture wound on his forehead where the raccoon had my cats' head in its mouth. Of course the wound festered and developed an abscess. Had to take him to the vet check all his shots, get him cleaned out and stitched up. All that cost over two GRAND!
Now he (the cat) has gone and gotten himself a puncture wound on his right shoulder....all the way through the skin. The wound probably won't heal and surely will get infected. I've got anti-biotic topical and oral meds and have got through training in stitching up wounds (military time) but have never tried it on a (erstwhile) domestic cat. The puncture could use one perhaps two stitches, enough to close it but still let it drain.

I may end up taking him to the vet anyway but I want to try to save some money....and learn how to do some of these things myself....

Any input?


Thanks!
I have to agree with Lilac Farm. Castration and confinement seem to be in order; that is a seriously expensive cat...

I'm not sure why but this inquiry calls to mind an SNL Weekend Update clip...


YouTube - Cat Hip Replacement
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Old 07-06-2010, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
4,123 posts, read 5,439,290 times
Reputation: 4854
An out-door cat he should not be. That will solve everything.

Also be sure you aren't feeding the raccoons.
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