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Old 01-18-2012, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,490 posts, read 52,106,971 times
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I hope to retire to a small southwestern city (8,000 or so) with a small hospital and a great university. I might take on a part time job but I expect to spend most of my time sitting in on classes and riding my motorcycle. I might even write a book or two.

I currently live in an over trafficed suburban town and am getting tired of the noise even if the stores are convienent. But do I really need three big grocery stores and a Home Despot within three miles? There is also the consideration that my current location has a COL at 120% of the national average and the place I want to go is rated at 84% or so.

If I want real rural there is a very small town 30 miles away that open out on almost empty grassland.
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Old 01-18-2012, 01:27 PM
 
2,401 posts, read 4,022,330 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
In 'rural' you can go from living as modern as you wish to hermit in the wilderness if you wish. There is a wide spectrum.

I am in a town of 250. The town's people got together in 1935 they burned the town's charter. We have no mayor, no city council and no tax collector. Most towns in this state [52%] are Un-incorporated Towns like this. How this state is setup requires no township can ever move it's borders to expand. So the cities can not expand to absorb little towns around them. I pay property taxes directly to the state at $1 an acre.

In my township, on my 150 acres of dense forest we have electricity. My home has heat from multiple sources. I have my own well for drinking water, and leechfield for sewage. The county here provides 'free' garbage pickup at the road side. I have a landline which provides me with DSL. I have daily USPS, UPS, and FEDEX service.

....


Where I am at, I am kinda like you except the population is around 5000 (still less than a 100 per sq mile).

Unincorporated, with dense forest... so no chance of solar for my house (though it is windy enough for a windmill or two), own well water (ground so forested it gives great amount of water... so sweet it is), sewage & free garbage pickups. Very rural that there is no fios here and only aluminum lines... slow slow internet.

I love maine's jerky... smith's or smithfield's (don't quite remember)... produced from an ol' homestead / farmhouse (not a factory)... quite cool.
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Old 01-18-2012, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,146 posts, read 50,309,418 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hueyeats View Post


Where I am at, I am kinda like you except the population is around 5000 (still less than a 100 per sq mile).
Less than 10 per sq mile here



Quote:
... Unincorporated, with dense forest... so no chance of solar for my house (though it is windy enough for a windmill or two), own well water (ground so forested it gives great amount of water... so sweet it is), sewage & free garbage pickups. Very rural that there is no fios here and only aluminum lines... slow slow internet.
Never heard of 'fios'

Wiki is blocked today in protest of SOPA, but I gather it is a paid service of Verizon.



Quote:
... I love maine's jerky... smith's or smithfield's (don't quite remember)... produced from an ol' homestead / farmhouse (not a factory)... quite cool.
I think every butcher shop makes their own sausage and jerky. I know a couple homesteaders who raise beef and pork, and market their own jerky and sausages in Farmer's Markets.

I have not seen Smiths, though googling I did find Smith's Log Smokehouse in rural Maine - Buy Smoked Jerky, Sausage, Salami, Ham, Bacon, Poultry, Cheese, Salmon, Venison, Snacks

I may try it if I see them in a store sometime. For now we have had to stop buying food for a while.

We normally only butcher one hog each fall, but we just finished butchering two. Our chest freezer can only shut because I stack cement blocks on the lid to hold it down. Too much food.

Last year we went from November to May without buying any food, we just had too much. Needed to consume what we had produced.

Gotta make room for fiddlehead season.
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Old 01-18-2012, 04:12 PM
 
212 posts, read 284,701 times
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I live in 2 states, up north for the summer, down south for the winter. I have many, many times lived just fine on less than $100 a week. I prefer to use mining claims as a "base", on BLM land, $100 a year for 20 acres. It's a lot easier to do this today, too, what with propane, solar power, satellite phones and net, etc. Gardening, hunting, trapping and gill nets feed me.
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Old 01-18-2012, 08:39 PM
 
18,852 posts, read 32,264,719 times
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I don't miss the city at all. I wonder how I could even stand it, and how other people live in such densely crowded urban settings. Sure, I ran out of bread today, not going to town to buy any, no big deal. I don't think rural life is hard, I rather like it. Maybe I am a recluse.
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Old 01-18-2012, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Middle America
37,143 posts, read 43,058,077 times
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I don't really identify with people who HATE living rurally but love urban or vice versa. I grew up rurally and loved it. I lived urban as a young adult and loved that, too. I don't think either is hard or odious. Both have their pros and cons.
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Old 02-20-2012, 01:21 AM
 
Location: portland for now
83 posts, read 136,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brushrunner View Post
Our DIL lives 15 miles from the City but in her mind she lives in the city.It is nothing for her to make 4 or 5 trips to town a day.

We live 50 miles from the city make the trip on the most part 2 times a month.

We went by a house yesterday by us,my wife told me in the last 15 years it has changed hands 3 times.

This got me to thinking so many are trying to move from the city to the country but it doesn't take long for them to realize that its not that easy to shop or whatever every day.So they consider rural living just too hard.Not long and they are running back to the city.

See so many every year come here camping and say oh I would love to live here for the peace and quiet I'm thinking no you wouldn't!

Just some thoughts.

brushrunner
I made the opposite transition from the country to the big city and honestly I can't stand it here. There too many people, too many cars, too much noise. I miss having deer in or outside of town, ponds with fishing within a 15 minute drive and back roads to speed down, or just cruise on by. I miss laid back people who like to fish, hunt, shoot guns, go dirt bike and atv riding or just having a good time. People here are stuck up to. they say their tolerant but really it's only if your a "sophisticated" liberal. I guarentee if you walked downtown wearing blue jeans or carharts, boots, a camo hat and any fishing hunting or car related tee shirt with a dip in people would either make fun of you and call you white trash or just not talk to you at all. people here are selfish and caught up in the ways of this dying world. Don't dare tell them you believe in jesus or that your conservative. I plan on moving back to the country the first shot i get. I don't care about huge stores or lots of restaurants, just give me a backyard barbeque with family, good friends and music and I'll be just fine.
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Old 02-20-2012, 10:48 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,963,310 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jasper12 View Post
I don't miss the city at all. I wonder how I could even stand it, and how other people live in such densely crowded urban settings. Sure, I ran out of bread today, not going to town to buy any, no big deal. I don't think rural life is hard, I rather like it. Maybe I am a recluse.
Thankfully, we don't have that issue. My wife bakes all our bread made from stone-ground, whole wheat and other grains we purchase from nearby mills, some dating back to the 1800s. Problem solved.

Having lived downtown in a sizeable city during our last 11 working years, living rurally is figuratively and actually a breath of fresh air. Driving 20 miles or more one way to shop is no hardship and being that far from "civilization" sure cuts down on impulse shopping and eating sugary, fat-filled foods from restaurants and drive-throughs. We plan for going to town which also keeps our driving costs much lower. Like others, our larder is always well-stocked.
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Old 02-20-2012, 11:43 PM
 
Location: In my own world
878 posts, read 1,455,722 times
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Once fuel surpasses $6 per gallon, you can kiss those far flung places goodbye. I anticipate some cratering home and land values. It's just not practical anymore.
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Old 02-21-2012, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,146 posts, read 50,309,418 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NomadicBear View Post
Once fuel surpasses $6 per gallon, you can kiss those far flung places goodbye. I anticipate some cratering home and land values. It's just not practical anymore.
Some of that may depend on whether your still using petroleum fuel.

Or what kind of mileage your vehicle is getting.

I go into the city once a week for supplies. My Dw commutes daily for her job, however her commuter vehicle gets 50+ mpg.
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