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Old 08-10-2010, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma(formerly SoCalif) Originally Mich,
13,387 posts, read 16,962,646 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by calicocutie View Post
I think I saw a show on Discovery or some such channel that said in some town in the Upper Peninsula there were no cars allowed. People traveled by sleigh. I wish I could remember where I saw that or where it was. Does anyone know? I think it was on near Christmas and they were doing a special on towns that are quite Christmasy--like North Pole Alaska, etc.
There was a town like that in the UP called "Newberry". We went up there to get a friend to work the farm with us and we had to park on the road and walk miles back in the woods to get him.
But I'm sure it's changed by now.
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Old 08-10-2010, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Niceville, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by calicocutie View Post
I think I saw a show on Discovery or some such channel that said in some town in the Upper Peninsula there were no cars allowed. People traveled by sleigh. I wish I could remember where I saw that or where it was. Does anyone know? I think it was on near Christmas and they were doing a special on towns that are quite Christmasy--like North Pole Alaska, etc.
Mackinac Island. In the summer, it's an exclusive resort town. If you've ever seen the movie "Somewhere in Time", they shot it at the island's famed Grand Hotel. But once the tourists go home, the rest of the year it's a small and close-knit town complete with K-12 school. There comes a point where Lake Huron starts to get icy and the ferries can't run anymore and the only way in or out is by plane (the basketball teams have to fly to away games on the mainland) unless it's a year when the ice on Lake Huron gets thick enough to reach the mainland by snowmobile.
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Old 08-11-2010, 10:01 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
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Van Buren, ME and Follett, TX
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Old 08-11-2010, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Sunny Florida
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I hope your wife is wrong and that Mayberry does still exist somewhere in our country.
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Old 08-12-2010, 09:41 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,083 posts, read 34,584,617 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thenewtexan View Post
Van Buren, ME and Follett, TX

I used to live 20 miles from van Buren, ME... it is not Mayberry.

Right now I live in Scottville, MI. Nothing remarkable, or outstanding about the place, except the attitude of the people and the schools. Don't bother looking up the schools test scores, there are others in this area that rank higher on the tests, but the difference is Scottville doesn't give a rip about a test. They care about teaching kids and doing so in a manner that each kid learns to the best of their ability. Sometimes that doesn't score so high on a standardized test, but it sure scores high in good kids and a very good education for every single child in the system.
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Old 08-19-2010, 02:36 PM
 
2,726 posts, read 4,574,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYJoe View Post
I don't mean MT AIRY, NC. I know about that. Does the mind set, the character, the whole 'we look out for each other' attitude that made that show such a beloved hit, does that exist anymore? My wife thinks I am naive to hope that maybe one day we will find our Mayberry. I hope she is wrong.
It does exist and this will be a lame answer, but it exists in your mind.

I asked myself why do I need other people to look out for me? I lived in a small town of about 2000. I grew up unsupervised as well as many kids in my block. During the summers we made sure we had our pockets full of dimes so we could buy frozen Kool-Aid pops from old ladies. We also would cross fields and canals to hidden beaches. During the winters we would sit under a railroad bridge and keep an eye out for wildlife. Only once did we see a wildcat.

It sounds awesome but life wasn't perfect. I was bullied at elementary school but nobody would help me because kids had to figure those things on their own. Most of the kids that I hung out with in my area were older and were boys so they were not going to mess with a girl. I just had to survive when school was in session.

I would say while parents and grandparents did look out for each others kids, they were mainly looking for things that would get us into serious trouble. They would not bother with things like bullying because when you live in a small town, interdependence is very important.

Now that I have my daughter, I am looking for that atmosphere of people looking out for each other. I know all of my neighbors here in South Florida. I am familiar with many people in the community simply by shopping at the same stores, saying hello to people, walking on the same paths, going to the same parks. I have to say that I do have people *looking* out for me and I look out for them but it is not in the same way that I grew up.

For example, I wanted to sell an item on Craigslist. When a local buyer agreed to come and look at it, I knocked on one of my neighbor's door, asked him to watch the transaction and he did it happily, even held my daughter for me. We always tell our immediate neighbors when we are going out of town and offer our parking spot. They always agree to keep an eye out for our house and fight over our spot. I know that at least 5 immediate neighbor's watch each others pets, water plants when somebody is out on vacation. After a hurricane, everybody brought out the grills to cook and we entertained each other with board games. Guess how long we have all been living together? 6 years. We moved into new homes around the same time.

Do we squabble? Heck yeah (e.g. loud mufflers!) but that is rare and we get over it...interdependence.

The best part is that nobody is in your business and to tell the truth, they don't want to know your business. That is one thing I don't miss about "Mayberry" places.

Last edited by crisan; 08-19-2010 at 02:46 PM..
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Old 08-23-2010, 07:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
Mayberry like the television show you'll never find it. Never could find a town like it. You CAN come close though. That is why I live where I do. Small town where everybody knows everybody. Store owners not only know who their customers are, they know who all the kids belong to in town as well. I've gotten a call from one of the store owners this summer to make sure it was alright for my 12 year old son to be looking at the pocket knives, and if he wanted to buy one, should she sell it to him. (Yes to both questions, by the way.)

Churches are still active, and respected. Schools are better now than they were in the 60's and 70's when I went to them. Some of my kids teachers are the same ones I had 35 years ago and they keep getting better at their job. One of the "recommendations" in this District is that Teachers keep learning new teaching methods, as well as staying current in their field. Some teachers were in my class all through school. Most have been here a long time (average tenure in the District is over 20 years.)

This town still is small like it was before I moved away years ago. Population is still almost exactly the same and that really is a good thing. People here can trace their family history by the road names, names on the faces of buildings, and names of the lakes. Most have moved away at some point, and many have returned to raise their own families. I know my own family history here goes back to the same time this town was settled back in the mid 1800's. We are not unusual either. Newcomers are welcomed here better than any other place I have lived as well. Odd really, considering how close people are to each other.

Kids still ride bikes around town all day every day during the summer. Most are gone first thing in the morning and show back up to their respective homes to stay around dark. Difference now than years ago, is that most of them now have cell phones. Whatever house they are at when it is Lunch, they just sit down and grab a bite with their friends and then back on their way again. Pick-up baseball games, pennies on the railroad tracks, ice cream bars from the drugstore, and sitting by the riverbank dangling feet in the moving water still are top spots for most kids here. Mayberry? No. But very close for those of us who live here. Is there a town out there that will feel that way to the OP? Probably, but it is going to take some digging and visiting to find it. I got lucky and was born in one, so when it came time to raise my family in a good wholesome environment outside the home, this was still the top pick out of the hundreds of places we looked when making that choice.
I live in SE MI. Which is your town that you describe above in W MI?
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Old 08-23-2010, 07:14 PM
 
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Originally Posted by okaydorothy View Post
It is so sad that we are loosing the very thing that we need. Our development is surrounded by acres off woods. My sons have no friends after 6 years here, we have no friends here also. Two reasons ; my kids go to parochial and therefore do not ride the bus with the kids in the development. The other reason ; everyone stays indoors. I mean everyone. My kids are the only ones outside. Their school friends come over and have a blast; why ; they are allowed to go for walks in the woods, to explore, (yes, take a phone) but have a blast. They are usually gone for 2 hours.
The other kids ; I dont know what they do, but they are never outside.Parents are never outside.
We are moving out of here as soon as we can. I thought it would be great to live in a newer development where there are really no cars, where kids can play outside and enjoy the weather. But no ; we are all indoors on our computers, watching the tv and in the air conditioned houses.

its lonely here.
What state are you in? I see the towns listed, but don't know where they are located.
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Old 08-23-2010, 07:16 PM
 
2,283 posts, read 4,797,724 times
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Originally Posted by LittleDolphin View Post
Yes, I do think each of us can find our personal Mayberry if we seek it..and sure, it's a tad different than 1950 America, but close enough to be warm and comfortable.

In my little town, the neighborhood policeman came over to our house to help us free our dog from the bedroom when I accidently locked him in there...we have dinner with our neighbors on a frequent basis, we cat-sit for our neighbors, when I had to fly out of state when my mother in law died, two neighbors offered to drive me to the airport and a third dog-sat for us..we have a real old-fashioned 4th of July parade and a local realtor gives away ice cream, friends stop off with extra produce, I get free-range eggs from my friend's boss who raises chickens, kids ride their bikes all over town and say hello to us, even though they don't know us...I could go on, but you get the picture.

And we weren't born or raised here, we're newcomers, only been here 7 years. But we got involved in the community and the community welcomed us warmly.

Be a good neighbor and you'll have good neighbors, we've found. And wave at every body, you probably know them. If not, everyone will think you're friendly.

Mayberry, yeah, it's still alive in America. We found ours, bet you'll find yours too.
Nice post. What town are you in?
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Old 08-23-2010, 07:28 PM
 
2,283 posts, read 4,797,724 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by montanamom View Post
The sad reality is, the outsourcing of our manufacturing jobs has hurt many American small towns, because it was the nearby mills and factories that sustained the citizens for generations, who in turn supported the mom and pop business in the town, etc.

I see the decline everyday, living in a "quaint" small town in North Carolina, where the Mayberry life used to exist to a certain extent, 30 or more years ago.

These days, you surivive here either by commuting an hour or more away to a large city for employment, working at minimum wage jobs in retail or restaurants (oh yes, we have our Super Walmart now), living on government checks or pensions, or you move in with money you earned somewhere else.
Good post, right on target. Many American small towns are dying because the strip malls decimated downtown mom and pop stores, and outsourced manufacturing jobs have led to the demise of small local businesses for employment. Big box stores have created low wage jobs and cheap Asian goods at the expense of US-made goods and jobs, not to mention acres and acres of blacktop parking lots and more dependence on cars, unfortunately.

Where do you live in western NC?
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