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Old 07-19-2010, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Kennesaw, GA
167 posts, read 770,289 times
Reputation: 216

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Quote:
Originally Posted by burr View Post
...and very sadly, mezzo, we cant ignore drugs, specifically CRANK, crystal meth. What a difference this world is with the introduction of this killer.
Oh, I definitely agree...but on the other hand, drugs have been around since the dawn of time. The biggest difference between the 1950's Mayberry era and present day is not that drugs merely exist, but that there is no shame in using them. In fact, it is exploited and practically glorified by the media! And due to the fact that shame and discipline rarely play a factor in current culture, people see little harm in using drugs. It is the "how is this hurting anyone else?" mentality. I think creating a close-knit community through relationships is a integral way of becoming aware of where the drugs/crime are happening and how to deal with it.
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Old 07-19-2010, 09:25 AM
 
Location: the sticks
823 posts, read 1,324,793 times
Reputation: 582
yeah, but at least Otis the town drunk, could be trusted (letting himself in and out of jail !). Crank addiction throws everything out the window. Crime rates; addicts steal from their own families and everything that isn't nailed down. THIS is a huge difference and not a lifestyle that one can copy from the 50s or 60s, at least from the 'Mayberry' side of it.
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Old 07-19-2010, 09:39 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,685,341 times
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I grew up in the 50's in rural America.

Never heard of drugs, never knew anyone who used drugs.
Never heard of drugs talked about in high school.

I don't think it became widespread til the mid 60's
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Old 07-19-2010, 09:54 AM
 
Location: the sticks
823 posts, read 1,324,793 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
I grew up in the 50's in rural America.

Never heard of drugs, never knew anyone who used drugs.
Never heard of drugs talked about in high school.

I don't think it became widespread til the mid 60's
and then, it (widespread) didn't reach the south rural areas, even the citys' (city, being a quite different definition to me as to some) 'till the mid-70s or even later. These shows about the cultural movements of the 60s are primarily about west coast, nertheast, and urban and university settings.
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Old 07-19-2010, 10:28 AM
 
Location: 5 years in Southern Maryland, USA
791 posts, read 2,490,360 times
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"I also believe there are areas of the US which are more conducive towards achieving that end than other areas. I know of small towns in Nebraska and also in Northern California (in the mountains) which foster the possibilities of which you speak."

Statistically, the rate of households with unlisted phone numbers, is lowest in rural great plains states like Nebraska. Overall life expectancy is higher there too. Unfortunately, the tiny communities there are dying out, as the gigantic sized mechanized farms there no longer need much population or labor as they used to. By contrast, the unlisted phone number rate is highest in Las Vegas where so many restless people come to escape or hide from failed domestic or financial situations back home.

One episode of Andy Griffith I found quite strange, was when the English tourist Malcolm Merriweather passed through Mayberry on his bicycle, and a crowd of strangers came out to welcome and feed him, and immediately offer him a job as a school crossing guard which he thought was great and what he always wanted for a satisfying career. LOL. In real life, sorry but things don't happen that way.

Last edited by slowlane; 07-19-2010 at 10:39 AM..
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Old 07-19-2010, 10:37 AM
 
46 posts, read 182,308 times
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I see you're from Suffolk County. Have you come out to the North Fork for a visit? Jamesport, Laurel, Mattituck, Cutchogue, Southold? I live out here and it's kind of Mayberry-ish. Farms, vineyards, beaches, small towns. You don't get that Southfork Hampton - Manhattan influence out here. People are generally down to earth and nice.
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Old 07-19-2010, 10:40 AM
 
Location: NY in body, Mayberry in spirit.
2,710 posts, read 1,820,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ozarksboy View Post
Listen, I hate to break the news to you, but the stuff on TV sitcoms is fiction. That means it is made up.

One, the lack of media: In the Fifties and early Sixties in rural America, you could only get one or two TV channels, if that. You had one theater in a small town, maybe. The TV and the movie house did not show filth, so children did not learn filth at an early age.

Two, the role of the church: Every small town had one, two or more active Christian churches, and almost everybody in town went to church. Even children who didn't pay close attention got a little bit of instruction in spiritual values.

Three, the public school system wasn't bogged down in paperwork and fear of lawsuits. Small-town school teachers and administrators were not afraid to give children a paddling or even a whipping when needed. And when children got home, they got another whipping from dad.

Four, most families had two parents and they were of the opposite sex.

Five, the people in small-town America in those days were likely born in or near their small town, as their parents were, and they grew up there. The bonds between neighbors were strong because they were probably distantly related.


I do not understand city slickers who say they are looking for a Mayberry type town, but they do not want a town without access to media. They do not want a town where churches are strong and active. They do not support corporal punishment in schools. They see nothing wrong with marriage, divorce, remarriage, divorce, etc. Once they move to "Mayberry" they won't go to Floyd the barber; they will drive to the nearest city to get a style at a salon. They won't take anything to Emmitt the fix-it man, they will throw away what doesn't work and drive to the city to do some serious shopping at the mall.

You can't have Mayberry any longer, my friend, because no one under 30 or even 40 really wants Mayberry.

That's just my cranky old hillbilly opnion. Many others, perhaps most, will disagree.

Gee, thanks O boy for providing me with the meaning of fiction. That 6th grade edge-u-cation really comes in handy. BTW, since the show was loosely based on Andy Griffiths' childhood in Mt Airy, NC., I'm certain some aspects of it are non-fiction (that means it is not made up).

Your five points about what made rural towns a little like Mayberry are not exclusive to small, southern towns. Those traits existed in many NY neighborhoods in the 50's and 60's.

I don't know about other "city slickers", but everything you say we won't do or don't want, I already do and want. Although I am north of 40 (that means over 40), I know many younger people who are tired of the fast pace and pressure of big city life(and even big suburb life), and are looking for more quality, less quantity.

I would even admit that in my Mayberry, we would welcome a crabby know it all like you. We need someone to make fun of!!!
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Old 07-19-2010, 11:18 AM
 
3,204 posts, read 2,502,730 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYJoe View Post
Gee, thanks O boy for providing me with the meaning of fiction. That 6th grade edge-u-cation really comes in handy. BTW, since the show was loosely based on Andy Griffiths' childhood in Mt Airy, NC., I'm certain some aspects of it are non-fiction (that means it is not made up).

Your five points about what made rural towns a little like Mayberry are not exclusive to small, southern towns. Those traits existed in many NY neighborhoods in the 50's and 60's.

I don't know about other "city slickers", but everything you say we won't do or don't want, I already do and want. Although I am north of 40 (that means over 40), I know many younger people who are tired of the fast pace and pressure of big city life(and even big suburb life), and are looking for more quality, less quantity.

I would even admit that in my Mayberry, we would welcome a crabby know it all like you. We need someone to make fun of!!!
You are part of the reason those types of places dissappeared. You come on here and display a "superior" attitude and admit you would make fun of someone. You aren't "getting" the substance of small town. It's more about mutual respect and compassion and less about trying to make someone else feel "small" because they don't meet your expectations or think like you.

My small town is very diverse, anti racial, open minded, civic minded, and conservative. Probably doesn't sound possible to most but conservatives aren't heartless and greedy. They just don't want some "city slicker" moving in telling them how to live their life.

There's no reason you can't live life at a slower pace right where you are. If you honestly put quality before quantity just move into a smaller house, buy a car when yours can no longer be fixed and live within your means. But you also have to quit giving a darn who has more possessions than you and realize what is truly important.

At that point you may not need anyone to make fun of.
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Old 07-19-2010, 11:27 AM
 
Location: NY in body, Mayberry in spirit.
2,710 posts, read 1,820,024 times
Reputation: 6389
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isitmeorarethingsnuts? View Post
You are part of the reason those types of places dissappeared. You come on here and display a "superior" attitude and admit you would make fun of someone. You aren't "getting" the substance of small town. It's more about mutual respect and compassion and less about trying to make someone else feel "small" because they don't meet your expectations or think like you.

My small town is very diverse, anti racial, open minded, civic minded, and conservative. Probably doesn't sound possible to most but conservatives aren't heartless and greedy. They just don't want some "city slicker" moving in telling them how to live their life.

There's no reason you can't live life at a slower pace right where you are. If you honestly put quality before quantity just move into a smaller house, buy a car when yours can no longer be fixed and live within your means. But you also have to quit giving a darn who has more possessions than you and realize what is truly important.

At that point you may not need anyone to make fun of.

YOU assume a lot about people you don't know.
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Old 07-19-2010, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Happy wherever I am - Florida now
3,359 posts, read 11,025,387 times
Reputation: 3849
I'd say it still exists to an extent in small town and rural America. The smaller the town, the more walkers, the more neighborhood churches, the greater the participation in community groups, having one HS, a lack of freeways, the higher the concentration of generational history.

The first words out of my grandmother's mouth (who just died) when she met a young person was "who was your mother?" She then proceeded to rattle off their family history for a couple of generations which many kids found astounding.

There are a couple of downsides with living in this sort of community; first everyone knows your business for the good or bad, and employment has largely disappeared from these areas which requires either long commutes outside the area or relocation. It is unfortunate, even my own kids were able to venture all over town as youngsters without my fearing for them. You knew every adult was looking out for them. Many kids still do it if a bit older.
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