U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-24-2010, 12:05 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,967,917 times
Reputation: 29122

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtimebanjo View Post
When will the suburbs knock out all of the rural areas? There are so many illegal and legal immigrants coming in here each here. That means more apartments and little fake communities will be built and more people will move rural to try and escape this. How long until the whole rural America lifestyle disapears?

Not sure why, but this has been a constant fear of mine for my whole life. I've always hated when I hear or see about new apartments being built out in rural areas or new suburbs being created. It's like this thing that is in my mind 24/7.
I like to think that when we moved from NorCal to rural, SW MO we landed several steps ahead of the suburbs. The reality is that they will likely continue to grow throughout the country but the other reality is that we are surrounded by a large lake, national forest, state parks and conservation areas which, along with hilly and rocky Ozark terrain preclude unimpeeded growth. The final reality is that we're no longer young and the chances are good that we'll be long gone when, if ever, this area becomes urban sprawl.

It was heartbreaking watching both southern and northern California succumb to rapid and massive growth and what were fields, orchards, forests and wild lands become covered in cement, asphalt and developments of strip malls and look-alike, cookie-cutter, crowded together homes in browns, tans and beiges, along with the required apartment complexes and other forms of low-income housing that does nothing to recommend so many areas. I've also seen this in other states and countries in which I've lived, and those countries still control their borders.

Yes, there is still a lot of open land in the country but much of what has not already been developed has little to recommnend it geographically, weather-wise and in terms of manufacturing opportunities and other job producing pursuits.

Sometimes I think I was born a bit too late!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-25-2010, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Travelers Rest SC
745 posts, read 1,997,066 times
Reputation: 503
Growth areas definitely lose small towns quickly. After living here in FL for 30 years, I've watched the suburbs sprawl all over everything. Another boom area is Richmond VA, where subdivisions are galloping westward at a dizzying pace. We bought land about 15 miles north of Greenville SC, and plan to build our last house there soon. Greenville is booming, too, but I figure by the time it gets out where we are, we'll either be dead, or filthy rich for owning acreage in the path of development. If I had 7 acres here in west central FL, I'd never have to work again after selling it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2010, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Middle America
37,143 posts, read 43,070,821 times
Reputation: 51714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cali BassMan View Post
Actually if you look right here on City-Data, you'll see alot of small towns have actually lost population, as the kids get out of High School and leave the town to go make a life for themselves.
I'm one of them...but I tried. I returned after I graduated from college and worked as the editor of the local paper. I did it as long as I could (about seven years). But low wages and living with only my family as a support network and virtually no peers took a toll. The kids-(mainly the ones that get college degrees; the HS-educated ones stay and work in the handful of manufacturing jobs left or streets dept, or get an associate's and become small-town law enforcement, or teacher's aides, CNAs, or bank tellers - leave because there are hardly any employment opportunities for the young, degreed folk.

My SO and I would LOVE to live in my small hometown. But we'd like to have jobs, and we'd like to have others like us to socialize with, and there aren't jobs for those people, either.

Trust me, there are people who'd LOVE to live in small communities, but that's a tough hurdle to overcome. I'm not willing to spend six hours a day commuting into the nearest urban area for employment, either. If I have to go to a city to find work, I'm just going to live in a city, much as I'd enjoy living as rurally as I grew up.

As far as sprawl eating up all now-rural land, I don't see it. There will always be places that are too far out of easy access to urban centers to get touched, or are too "unattractive" for other reasons (extreme weather issues, topography, etc.) to do anything other than remain remote. This is particularly true as you get away from the sprawl of the east cost, where things are so compacted. The more things get spread out, the less and less realistic it is to have a metro region that spreads out halfway across a very large state. At some point, there's a tipping point.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2010, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Midvale, Idaho
1,568 posts, read 2,434,493 times
Reputation: 1967
I doubt our small town will go to suburbia any time soon. It used to be a large town for its' day in the early 1900's. Even though we are only 20 miles to the next largest town of 5K and 10 miles the other way to a town of say 400. There is nothing here to bring any one but the retired. It is not the utopia of mountains pine trees lakes and rivers. There are mountains 10 minutes from here with those pine trees and lakes close by a river runs through town and even large tourist attractions not too far up and down the road. But to live here there just is not the calling or jobs to allow the people to come in.

THIS is why we like it so much and hope it stays this way. We are thrilled to live with the inconvenience of a tiny town.

Chris
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2010, 05:45 PM
 
921 posts, read 1,845,721 times
Reputation: 1384
Quote:
Originally Posted by flgargoyle View Post
For some reason, small towns work well in VT. Heck, the capital is only 4500 people! There are small towns all over the state, and each one has a general store where you can buy anything from bait to a $100 bottle of wine. Chain stores are very, very rare there, and local businesses are strongly supported. Too bad it's A) Rather expensive, and B) Too cold for better than half the year!
New England is like its own different country from the rest of America. It's one of the few regions that still has vibrant small towns. Strip malls are still rare there. The small sizes of the New England states provide better governance and you've got a highly educated population there, from the four Ivies and several dozen highly ranked colleges. Sales tax are relatively low to help local businesses. And there's a high degree of conservation in the New England states, so no rampant sprawl.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-29-2010, 12:51 PM
 
Location: hopefully NYC one day :D
411 posts, read 1,061,003 times
Reputation: 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
As far as sprawl eating up all now-rural land, I don't see it. There will always be places that are too far out of easy access to urban centers to get touched, or are too "unattractive" for other reasons (extreme weather issues, topography, etc.) to do anything other than remain remote. This is particularly true as you get away from the sprawl of the east cost, where things are so compacted. The more things get spread out, the less and less realistic it is to have a metro region that spreads out halfway across a very large state. At some point, there's a tipping point.
Wait, this doesn't make sense. Wouldn't more spread out, sprawling, and less dense development make it more likely for a metro area to spread across halfway across a state. The denser a metro, the less space it would spread across.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-29-2010, 01:48 PM
 
4,913 posts, read 4,904,531 times
Reputation: 6120
If not for massive legal & illegal immigration ( around 2 million new people a year arriving in the USA ) pushing citizens into the more rural areas of our country sprawl would not be so big of an issue. There are other reasons as well for this pressure including the baby-boomer crowd looking to retire.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-29-2010, 02:43 PM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,685,341 times
Reputation: 8170
I wish sprawl would come to our small,rural town.

Many years back, the town of 400 had a high school graduating about 50 kids a year.
Since then, we have been graduating in the low 30's per year.

The town tried to recruit some industry and it seemed the only firms interested were the ones that wanted huge incentives $$$$$$$$$ , wanted to pay minimum wage with no benefits.

The town then decided that the role would become a bedroom community since many people comute 35 miles to a city of 70,000.

Our school was in poor shape and a decision was made to build a new k-12 cuz even though we had no real tax base to pay for it, people would move to our " bedroom community" , build new houses, and spread the tax burden.

It didn't happen !

We are now one of the highest taxed districts in the entire state of Minnesota and a vote is coming in November to raise property taxes even higher to help with operating expenses.

There are other K-12 districts 15 miles south,10 miles east, 9 miles north.

The people who supported/voted for the new school put their faith on the town becoming a bedroom community and it failed to materialize.

I voted--NO, as I have heard this " bedroom community" myth for the last 20 years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-29-2010, 02:57 PM
 
1,472 posts, read 2,030,446 times
Reputation: 1152
When we first moved here 16 years ago you didn't see Dusk to Dawn Lights now you do.Phone was Party Line now we have DSL.The Store has Electric and Meat.Things are changing slower than most the world but changing and people are changing too.

brushrunner
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-29-2010, 03:19 PM
 
4,913 posts, read 4,904,531 times
Reputation: 6120
I'm in a small village in east central New Hampshire: we have more big-box stores in the area, and more mcmansions, but the area overall is not that different than it was from 30 years ago. We do have a lot more baby-bommers up here retiring. Northern New England really has a nice mix of rural living along with good medical & shopping ( NH has no sales tax ) and a low population. New Hampshire, Maine & Vermont only have 3.2 million people spread out in the 3 states.

It's only a 2 hour drive to Boston from where I am. I think this is by far one of the best areas in the country to retire to. Low crime, beautiful lakes & mountains, and if you need services you can get to them with ease.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:51 PM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top