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Old 08-07-2010, 02:38 PM
 
1,530 posts, read 3,512,283 times
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you need to separate them asap. this hen is being pecked on because the rooster dont like her. i had that happen and i had to get rid of the rooster. i actually gave him away and got another one who didnt treat her like that. let us know what happens, i love chickens
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Old 08-08-2010, 10:10 PM
 
Location: SW MO
1,238 posts, read 4,071,469 times
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You may need to separate the injured hen from the others, as BOTH of them may peck at her wounds. Hens will kill other hens from pecking at anything that looks "different". Are you keeping the rooster for a particular reason? The hens will lay without him, the eggs just won't be fertile. Does the other hen bully her? If so, she may just be the unlucky bottom of the pecking order.
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Old 08-08-2010, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,147 posts, read 50,318,661 times
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The OP said nothing about any injured hens.

I only read the OP talking about hens with bare backs.

I agree that if a hen is injured she needs to be seperated, but not simply because a roo has been riding her.

Here we have a lot of slow hens.
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Old 08-08-2010, 11:23 PM
 
Location: Finally escaped The People's Republic of California
11,120 posts, read 7,660,004 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
The OP said nothing about any injured hens.

I only read the OP talking about hens with bare backs.

I agree that if a hen is injured she needs to be seperated, but not simply because a roo has been riding her.

Here we have a lot of slow hens.
She must be the pretty one
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Old 08-09-2010, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,147 posts, read 50,318,661 times
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We have eight small coops, each coop holds a seperate breed of poultry. To my observation maybe a third of the hens have bare patches, some breeds more so and some breeds less.

If I removed the roos it would stop. But then our poultry production would cease to be self-propagating, and we would no longer be able to cull heavy and fill our freezer each fall.
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Old 08-09-2010, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Somewhere out there
9,618 posts, read 11,512,601 times
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I have hens. Hens only, grown by us from chicks. Initially I didn't build a large enough coop for them and they eventually and apparently got to picking on some of the less dominant hens. Now, 5 of them have varying degrees of feather damage, one quite severely (bare, red skin on under-back, rear, upper back and under wings) and though I see new pin feathers coming in, I do have two that seem to be permanently damaged with no new feathers seemingly coming in.

I am going to build a new Coop II that will allow me to separate out the less dominant hens into their own area, and I'll also build within that new area a separation pen where I can keep an harassed hen or two on their own during the day.

We've also taken to letting them out into our yard, 5 acres, during the day to minimize competition. Problem is I occasionally find eggs in hastily made nests under the flowers ,etc, a few days later, and now we have a very insistent skunk who seems to be looking for those errant eggs each evening.

Anyhow, point was, no roosters involved. We've seen one of the hens with dominant "rooster" behavior, trying to "ride" and peck one or two of the hens. A chicken expert here has told us that one should probably go: to her hen house down the road or to be served with dumplings.

Q: can you kill and eat an animal you've raised from a chick for > a year, and that you've lovingly named?

"Mmmm! Little Eresthesia is particularly tasty with these dumpin's tonight! Must be tender 'cause we luhhhvd her so much! Yuhhhhmmm!"

Anyone with any other ideas on this issue, I'd love to see, in particular, our Austalorpe, a once-perfect all-black beauty we named Rosa Parks, regain some of her back feathers and hide that angry-looking red skin. Can't be good, esp. with winter on it's inevitable way.

BTW, see this one two: http://www.backyardchickens.com/

and...

http://www.poultrycommunity.com

Bah-Gahwk!
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Old 08-09-2010, 07:21 PM
 
Location: SW MO
1,238 posts, read 4,071,469 times
Reputation: 987
Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
The OP said nothing about any injured hens.

I only read the OP talking about hens with bare backs.

I agree that if a hen is injured she needs to be seperated, but not simply because a roo has been riding her.

Here we have a lot of slow hens.
If her back is "raw and red", the other hen may start picking at it. I would still separate them if possible until it heals and re-feathers. Sometimes just a bare spot was enough to start my chickens pecking.
Our rooster also sometimes bloodied the hen's combs while mating. Again, this would cause pecking and we would separate them until the comb healed. Some chickens just like the taste of blood I guess.
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Old 08-09-2010, 07:38 PM
 
Location: CA
830 posts, read 2,400,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaada View Post
you need to separate them asap. this hen is being pecked on because the rooster dont like her.
Oh, he likes her all right.

Some people put "Hen Savers" and the like on their hens to prevent this. They have a website.

I've only got hens, but my boyfriend has both roos and hens and all of his girls are barebacked. He does have too many roos at the moment though.
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Old 08-09-2010, 11:39 PM
 
1,530 posts, read 3,512,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigcats View Post
Oh, he likes her all right.

Some people put "Hen Savers" and the like on their hens to prevent this. They have a website.

I've only got hens, but my boyfriend has both roos and hens and all of his girls are barebacked. He does have too many roos at the moment though.
poor thing she needs a break then lol
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Old 08-10-2010, 09:57 AM
 
77 posts, read 211,303 times
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I like this thread. Should be a regular forum.
So many chicken questions - they are so interesting.
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