U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-14-2010, 03:38 PM
 
1,309 posts, read 3,038,815 times
Reputation: 614

Advertisements

when iam on line i try and teach the new people how to read a person body langauge and how there movements means something.

i the guys and girls i call the how to walk in highheels thing

i tell them watch women walk in high heels ..for there are three type of women who walk in the high heel types

1-the stomper

2-the waddler

3-the Sorphia loren type who can pull it off ..if see the movie grumpy old men when she walks away that is how you walk in high heels ..

so i tell people watch how people watch and move and body langauge when dealing with people and you will see a what i mean by that..so when you see the sorphia loren type watch out for somebody is trying to get you to take you eyes off the prize ..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-14-2010, 03:39 PM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,682,398 times
Reputation: 8170
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissingAll4Seasons View Post
Any job where you spend the majority of your time working on a computer or talking on the phone and not dealing physically with a customer or piece of work is a viable candidate for at least part-time telecommuting. Teaching is an awesome candidate, even though I know you prefer not to do so; but living out in the bush, many of our students wouldn't get a rounded education or advanced courses if some teachers weren't willing to teach online.

Most hands-on services, like carpentry or plumbing, and factory-type assembly work would still need to physically commute. Most clerks at stores and banks would still have to physically commute. And those jobs are all equally important to a functioning economy and we need the folks who do them. But just think how much nicer their commute would be if the other half (rough guess) of the workforce wasn't commuting on the roads every day clogging up traffic.
very rough guess

Do you actually believe that half of the people commuting to work could do their type of job from home ?:

I doubt it would total even 5%.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2010, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Itinerant
6,797 posts, read 4,379,314 times
Reputation: 5109
Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
very rough guess

Do you actually believe that half of the people commuting to work could do their type of job from home ?:

I doubt it would total even 5%.
Is that a guess? Or the product of a legacy of a manufacturing based economy?

Well lets put it this way, I used to work for a company that employs ~90,000 people worldwide 50,000 in the US. There was a VP level argument between several of the Corporate VP's in 1999 about how the company was wasting millions (if not billions) of dollars building and servicing bricks and mortar buildings for employees when they were developing the technology to enable other companies to telecommute.

The resolution... That the money be wasted, because people were more familiar with traditional working arrangements. Not that it was more cost effective, or flexible, or any other reason. Just that it was a more traditional working arrangement.

Now to give you an example of how traditional a working environment this was (and hence the irony of maintaining a traditional working environment), an intern once came to work in only a bathrobe and slippers to test the casual dress code. I've worked 2 day weeks before for several weeks because my flex-time enabled me to put in my 40 hours per week, and I had other commitments the other 3 working days in those weeks. I also worked at times 3 days a week 10pm-6am and the remaining two days 10am-6pm to enable me to eliminate a large meeting schedule and actually be productive. It's also to a almost ubiquitous degree the template that is used by many other companies in the same field or business.

Fast forward 8 years, and unless there was an established business critical need, then managers were obliged to agree to allow their reports to telecommute all but 4 days per month, for those 4 days they had to be on site. This was following an internal study that resulted in that company knowing that at any time it needed a grand total of a maximum of 500 people on site (and nearly all of them were minimally skilled for the industry), to perform tasks that could not be done remotely. This is less than 1% of the company employees. So there are 32.5M square feet of offices being used worldwide, including all heating, lighting and ancillary costs, to enable ~89,500 the ability to work in a more traditional working environment, which is as I described above.

If you are dealing with anything that is based on anything that is primarily immaterial (does not produce any physical product) for example almost all administrative, financial, retail, payroll and services; with few exceptions most of the employees do not need an office to work in or a storefront.

For instance lets look at things you can obtain without visiting a storefront...

A mortgage, and legal advice to buy a house, the house itself can be bought without visiting any business storefront, carpeting and furniture for the house, appliances and Audio-Video equipment for the house (and CD's/DVD's/Blu Ray disks for the AV equipment), a car to take you to the house, get Cable/satellite/FiOS installed to the house, Laptops, and computers for the Cable/Satellite/FiOS. Home improvement supplies for the house, replacement parts and tools for the house, car, and appliances. Cellphones so you don't need to be at home to make a call. Groceries to store in your kitchen cabinets and appliances that you previously bought without visiting a store. Insurance for your home, health and car. In fact if you try really hard its almost impossible that you cannot find anything that you could possibly want from an Aardvark to a Zebra that is not available to be delivered to your home, either via the internet or a phone call.

Now for a service, you may need to travel to a location for that service or that service may come to you. However all of the arrangements, do not need a storefront or an office, indeed many service technicians (especially those employed by telco's, cable, power/gas companies) are self-employed and do not have a specific business office, unless it's required by their local zoning laws. The only exception to this is in general vehicle maintenance, however most larger vehicle service centers do have a pick up and drop off service if you desire it, or they can send a service vehicle to perform the servicing wherever you may be.

Other than that, it's really only in the manufacturing, resource extraction, and agricultural trades that specifically need a workforce to come to them. Unfortunately in the US manufacturing isn't doing so well, and most farmers place of business is also their domicile (so technically you could say they're working from home). Even in these cases, other than those who are hands on the product or equipment to produce the product do not need to be on-site.

Here's a quick question for you Marmac, you ran (or run) a dairy farm, do you have an accountant who works for you, do they have an office on your farm? How about a lawyer, do they have a office on your farm? Your trucking company (or buyer if they provide transportation)... do they have an office on your farm. I doubt it, but suppose none of these people had an office other than in their home, would that affect the service they supply you.

You go to a bank to deposit checks, but you could just mail it instead, if you need cash there's an ATM (you can deposit your check at the same time too), sure that prevents you from "cashing a check" but depending on your deposit and the balance on your account you may not be able to just "cash a check". If the check is for $10,000 and you have $2000 in your account then you're going to have to wait for it to clear anyway since your balance doesn't cover the check value.

I guess in the ultimate analysis, it's actually easier to find jobs that you cannot telecommute for, than those that you can. Those jobs being anything where it involves uncommon locations (farming/forestry, mines), machinery that is cost prohibitive to supply, or transportation of complete or parts of physical products that are uneconomical to transport between remote locations. Everything else is fair game if you ignore the dogma of "going to work".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-15-2010, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
9,965 posts, read 19,292,579 times
Reputation: 9041
We have some new tele-commuting neighbors. They do something with mainframes during the night and keep odd hours. They also spend a lot more money than anyone else and are kinda clueless about everyone else's living conditions around here. They don't have kids so they don't interact with their neighborhood schools or playgrounds. There aren't any local stores or coffee shops to meet the other neighbors. I'm not sure if they are ever going to integrate into the neighborhood. I think for the folks who are telecommuting, some sort of community tie in would help them fit into their new neighborhoods. Those neighborhood coffee shops sound like a good idea. Something kinda like a neighborhood pub except with coffee.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-15-2010, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 8,735,734 times
Reputation: 3364
Quote:
Originally Posted by hotzcatz View Post
We have some new tele-commuting neighbors. They do something with mainframes during the night and keep odd hours. They also spend a lot more money than anyone else and are kinda clueless about everyone else's living conditions around here. They don't have kids so they don't interact with their neighborhood schools or playgrounds. There aren't any local stores or coffee shops to meet the other neighbors. I'm not sure if they are ever going to integrate into the neighborhood. I think for the folks who are telecommuting, some sort of community tie in would help them fit into their new neighborhoods. Those neighborhood coffee shops sound like a good idea. Something kinda like a neighborhood pub except with coffee.
Guess we were lucky, when our new rural neighbors found out we were computer geeks, they tracked us down... for tech support

But it is nice to have at least one social gathering place in a town that doesn't revolve around children or religion. A coffee shop, diner, or some other "neutral" ground helps. Children and religion might be integral and important parts of the community, but not everyone has kids or the same religion... makes it hard to include everyone.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-15-2010, 02:05 PM
 
1,472 posts, read 2,029,982 times
Reputation: 1152
17 years ago there was No Phone Service in our area.We finally got it but it was Party Line,which changed shortly.

Now because we have the Newer Service Line we was able to get DSL before people that had Phone before us.

My wife now has an Advertising Business mainly taken care of from our Home and we are looking to expand.

brushrunner
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-15-2010, 02:16 PM
 
Location: MMU->ABE->ATL->ASH
9,171 posts, read 17,544,093 times
Reputation: 10040
When i was up in PA, there was a work at home group, We got together (scheduled) Tue/Thr from noon-130p at a local dinner for lunch, we all worked for different companies, also spread out into workout groups, and other socal groups, Was informal, When i move to GA, i worked at home for 9month before the office space was open (and there is nothing I do in my cube now that I could not do from home). I support a computer sytem in NJ from GA, But being in the office does have beniefits, mostly socal.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-15-2010, 02:24 PM
 
1,309 posts, read 3,038,815 times
Reputation: 614
i like that basic fact of telecomputing is the hours i can work ..but tonight i have it off and iam going out to see a movie or the book store and a dinner and then maybe to see a lady friend after she gets off work tonight ...that is the biggest thing for me is the hours i can work at ..


plus i want to add this to the post ..

alot of times when my team would come into the business the people where allways calling us the goon squad before they even got to know us as ind type person ..this way i do not have have the need for basic work socail interacts with the rest of the staff for now i deal with the owner of the business and no one else and that is the nicest part also ..plus the fact iam paid every friday at the drop of midnite and my money is in the bank ..

Last edited by henry1; 10-15-2010 at 02:32 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-15-2010, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 8,735,734 times
Reputation: 3364
True, remote telecommuting does impact the day-to-day social interactions working in a central office provides. For some, this is a benefit and greatly improves their productivity; but for others, it can be difficult. Some people just work better with other people to chat with and bounce ideas off of and it works better for them if they can do it in person rather than via email, IM or phone/teleconference. If they're lucky, one of their colleagues lives/works nearby (or they're married to one - bonus!) or they can schedule work conferences periodically. One company I worked for specifically kept one office with a large conference room open when they went primarily remote... that way folks could still have brainstorming sessions and client meetings when they needed to but the company only had to maintain one office instead of 37 office buildings.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:16 AM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top