U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-27-2010, 11:03 PM
 
Location: IN
21,104 posts, read 36,596,839 times
Reputation: 13661

Advertisements

The sense of community, preservation of old houses, general level of safeness, less stress, less "keeping up with the Jones," less traffic, more nature, etc!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-28-2010, 03:11 AM
 
Location: Western Australia
36 posts, read 46,065 times
Reputation: 85
Not having to lock your doors on your car or your home.
Space on the roads to drive freely.
Being able to pop in to town without your wallet and putting your groceries on your shop tab.
Walking around outside naked (I live on a farm!)
Getting smiles and hellos from everyone and anyone, whether they are 8 or 88.

So, so many more things.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-28-2010, 11:40 AM
 
Location: NW Montana
451 posts, read 859,906 times
Reputation: 383
Default Why do you LOVE living in a small town?

And then there are the real-life adventures of small-town living such as this one:

Rural rescue during blizzard. [Link to the Billings (Montana) Gazette]

mg
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-02-2011, 12:35 AM
 
Location: Diaspora
21,540 posts, read 24,677,950 times
Reputation: 8930
Silence. Being able to sit on the front porch and hear nearly nothing for miles. Once in awhile I can here the horn of a train, but the tracks are over ten miles away.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-02-2011, 03:59 AM
 
25,876 posts, read 32,434,182 times
Reputation: 23095
I love the sense of community and concern for your neighbor. Knowing your neighbor, growing up with them. I love the rural setting. Being close to the land. You get a intimate understanding of how the land works, how weather comes and goes.

There is something magical about the wind sweeping through the pine trees. The smell of those pine in the spring time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-05-2011, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mountains
1,830 posts, read 2,662,162 times
Reputation: 2888
Someone mentioned the views!!!!! OMG! Every morning I go from 1 room to the next in my 1886 farmhouse admiring the views!!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-05-2011, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Spots Wyoming
18,696 posts, read 36,913,317 times
Reputation: 2147483647
I love the small town living:

I know my neighbors, not because we socialize (but we do) but because I can depend on them to help if needed.

I know my neighbors, not because we socialize (but we do) but because I can help them when help is needed.

I don't just know the neighbors, but I trust my neighbors. I don't even lock my doors, even if I'm going to be gone for a while. I know the neighbors will keep and eye on my place, as I would theirs.

I like the idea that when I go to the post office (no we don't have mail delivery, few anymore would understand) I can say howdy and stop and visit with others at their mail box. Some I know, some I don't, but they're friendly and will respond.

I like the idea that if my fence is falling over, I need to go out and fix it. And it's almost like my neighbor is keeping an eye on me because when I go out to fix it, he's out there within a couple minutes with a post hole digger, a shovel and willingness to help. I didn't call him, but he was there. AND, he acted like it was as much his responsibility as it was mine.

I like the idea that I can take my plow around and plow out driveways of unsuspecticting senior citizens. I've been caught a couple times and have been forced, under protest, to drink copious amounts of coffe while eating some apple pie.

I like the idea that one morning I broke down. Blew a radiator on the way to town. It was -21 temp. No wind chill, just -21. As I coasted over to the side, I called a neighbor. He said, "I'll be right there." I had to wait 15 minutes for him to get there to pull me home. In that 15 minutes, I had 9 people stop. Some offered to get help, some offered to let me set in their vehicle and stay warm until my neighbor arrived. Surprisingly, some were from my town, but some were out of state people. I was not on the interstate, I had coasted down an off ramp in the middle of nowhere.

I like the idea that the local kis come over and ask me, "Gramps, can we go fishing?" they know they are welcome, but they ask anyhow.

ahh, what was the question? hahaha
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2011, 12:43 AM
 
Location: Perpetuality On Wheels
424 posts, read 415,856 times
Reputation: 139
Default Small town in west?

While all posts in the topics are very appreciated and , envied in a sense, no single post touched a small town in west, or there isn't one?
The reason to ask such question is for small towns in mid or east, transplants may not be welcomed even they genuinely like to integrate themselves with the original inhabitants.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2011, 04:08 AM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
7,773 posts, read 13,223,327 times
Reputation: 32222
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeilVA View Post
Silence. Being able to sit on the front porch and hear nearly nothing for miles. Once in awhile I can here the horn of a train, but the tracks are over ten miles away.
Neil, last summer my wife and I (we're retired night owls who sometimes stay up till 1 or so) went out in the front yard and sat in our porch swing that's hanging on a wooden A frame. Not a sound anywhere and millions of stars overhead! We almost had a sore neck from laying our heads back and finding the different constellations.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SD4020 View Post
I love the sense of community and concern for your neighbor. Knowing your neighbor, growing up with them. I love the rural setting. Being close to the land. You get a intimate understanding of how the land works, how weather comes and goes.
There is something magical about the wind sweeping through the pine trees. The smell of those pine in the spring time.
I have lived in small towns all my life (so far!), Don't see any need of moving to a big city. There are 2 rental houses next to us (3 BR 2 bath houses on an acre (just like the one I'm buying for $72,000) renting for $350/month. Good, sturdy, clean homes. But our neighbors change from time to time and I usually find myself standing out in the yard talking to them for the first time within a week of them moving in. There is one thing I don't like about some small town folks. When I was in grade school, on PTA night, the school would not only be packed, but Mom AND Dad would be there. Now, in the 3 towns I've lived in, you're doing good to get many parents to come at all. Getting back to good things, when it snows at night or early morning, you open the front door and there is total silence. It's like everything has been soundproofed by the snow.



Quote:
Originally Posted by seagull84 View Post
While all posts in the topics are very appreciated and , envied in a sense, no single post touched a small town in west, or there isn't one?
The reason to ask such question is for small towns in mid or east, transplants may not be welcomed even they genuinely like to integrate themselves with the original inhabitants.
If you're asking are transplants welcome where we live any place other than the west, all I can say is where I've lived everybody is welcomed. I have seen families move in a neighborhood and won't have to cook a meal for a couple days. Your new neighbors bring you casseroles, fresh baked bread, or who knows what. They're name is always on a piece of tape on the bottom of the dish. That way, after they get settled, they can bring the dish back and sit and visit for a while.

Never guess I like small towns, would you? Hello from Cadiz, Ky, home of the world's largest country ham biscuit (4,000 lb!). Population 2,373.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2011, 11:09 AM
 
Location: NW Montana
451 posts, read 859,906 times
Reputation: 383
Quote:
Originally Posted by seagull84 View Post
While all posts in the topics are very appreciated and , envied in a sense, no single post touched a small town in west, or there isn't one?
The reason to ask such question is for small towns in mid or east, transplants may not be welcomed even they genuinely like to integrate themselves with the original inhabitants.
Huh? Didn't realize the 'West' was targeted for comment.

Nonetheless, I'm posting from NW Montana. How West were you hoping for, seagull?

mg
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:04 AM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top