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Old 03-31-2011, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Washington State
130 posts, read 307,201 times
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For those of you not still snowed in, have you started your spring gardens?
I planted some snnow peas, radishes, lettuce, beets and chard last weekend. I plan on adding spinach and turnips in this weekend.
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Old 04-01-2011, 04:52 AM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,157,970 times
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I am starting to gear up for Spring that is for sure.

I just finished my Action Plans for each field that I farm, and might plow up a new farm the boys bought for their dairy farm. It is only 100 acres but it is a serious investment of time and money to get that fallow ground back into production.

On my end of things, I got 20 acres of forest clear-cut over the winter to make way for some more tillable farm ground and pasture, so I must clean that up, get some wire up on it and do have a team of consultants coming to view the Action Plans and see where to go from there.

And of course right now is lambing season so I am extremely busy with that. Still snowing as I type this, but things are about to explode into a fury of activity.
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Old 04-01-2011, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Washington State
130 posts, read 307,201 times
Reputation: 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrokenTap View Post
I am starting to gear up for Spring that is for sure.

I just finished my Action Plans for each field that I farm, and might plow up a new farm the boys bought for their dairy farm. It is only 100 acres but it is a serious investment of time and money to get that fallow ground back into production.

On my end of things, I got 20 acres of forest clear-cut over the winter to make way for some more tillable farm ground and pasture, so I must clean that up, get some wire up on it and do have a team of consultants coming to view the Action Plans and see where to go from there.

And of course right now is lambing season so I am extremely busy with that. Still snowing as I type this, but things are about to explode into a fury of activity.
That is a lovely picture you are painting there.
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Old 04-01-2011, 04:47 PM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,157,970 times
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"sigh"...I wish. It sounds far better then it is that is for sure. The clear-cuts look nasty because there is brush and stumps everywhere, but if you can use your imagination a bit, you can see that once the brush is removed, the stumps are pushed out of the way, and and corn and grass are both started, it is a nice picture I guess. Its all about vision and I know this farm (1757) started out in the same manner. It just takes time, energy and money.

Last year I was able to clear an acre of ground, making a an L-shaped field into a rectangular field (because we use bigger equipment now that needs bigger fields), and it felt good to go from a forest in May to harvesting corn off that same ground in October. That was an accomplishment really. Granted the corn was not the best, but it was done. Now I am tackling about 20 acres, but I don't see it getting done this year. But I am only 36 years old, so I got plenty of time.
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Old 04-01-2011, 06:24 PM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,157,970 times
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I found a before and after picture of that acre of land I cleared last year. An acre isn't much I know, but considering what I started with (lots of trees) it sure was. Sorry about the equipment in the way, but its the only picture I have of the area before we started clearing it.

For those that are interested I have found that it costs about $1500 per acre to clear forest into fields.
Attached Thumbnails
Spring Gardening-before-after-clearing.jpg   Spring Gardening-brush.jpg  
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Old 04-01-2011, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,473 posts, read 14,165,049 times
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It sounds like a lot of work. I like trees. OP, maybe you'd like to post in the gardening forum. Spring is spring like mad over there.
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Old 04-03-2011, 05:05 AM
 
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I like trees as well, but being from Maine where we are the most heavily forested state in the nation, we have plenty of those. Years ago paper mills and sawmills ruled this area of the world, but now with so many countries subsidizing the forestry industry, we just cannot compete here, and so the paper mills have shut down and the sawmills have closed. With an uptick in start up farms, Maine is surging back to clearing forest to make way for fields. Its rather unique in that everything I have cleared was fields at one time, as evidenced by the rockwalls that defines its borders.

With local food production getting big now, you will see more and more of this.
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Old 04-06-2011, 01:59 PM
 
6,501 posts, read 5,588,841 times
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I put in my snow peas on Sunday, but that is all so far. It's a little early for anything else right now -we've been getting a rain/snow mix every day this week. Onions will be next - I always plant those before mid April. Then lettuce, spinach, turnips and beets by Easter. I got some boxes of those annual/perennial wildflower mix seeds at the dollar store. I plant those every year as borders between my vegetable gardens. This brightens up the property from the monotony of just vegetable gardens with riots of ever-changing color, plus they attract bees.
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Old 04-06-2011, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,473 posts, read 14,165,049 times
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I WISH I had gotten snow peas this year! My kohlrabi and spinach are just little babies, now. Of course the couple of weeds in their beds are growing 10X faster, but I have to wait until they get bigger before I'll risk pulling out the weeds.

I also planted these guys earlier this week:
purple asparagus
"plum" tomatoes
Squash
Zucchini


I also planted nasturtum and marigold seeds around the veggie beds to try to deter bugs.

Next week, I'm going to plant the other items such as pole beans, cilantro, the "juicy" tomatoes, watermelon and more squash. The peppers and eggplant are still inside being "started." I'm kind of a bad food gardener, but I hope I'll improve.

Otherwise, my BIG excitement this spring has been for the non-food gardening! I am completing the flowerbeds on top of my leach field. I transplanted a bunch of non-edible perennials, and I also put out some seeds for black eyed susan, eupatorium and something else I can't remember. I'm planning to plant the butterfly bush and more echinacea over the weekend! I also transplanted some iris, lily of the valley and yucca (for structure) to the beds. The yucca roots seem pretty tame, so hopefully all will be well in the field.

The beds are circular and I made them with the leaves from last fall. I still need to dig trenches around them and put on a little more mulch, but I'll fight with that over the summer.

I also expanded my moist shade garden and am excited to plant some more ferns this year! I am also planting ferns in the woods behind the house. One of my plans is to repopulate native plants in my small woods, but that's a longer term scheme.

I've already planted a couple of natives and I sowed a bunch of seeds last fall. The garlic mustard and other invasives are really overgrown, so I'm just plucking them up a little at a time. It's a tough fight and they're EVERYWHERE.

Besides the circular beds, I've been doing some transplanting and small additions to the beds I started last year. I also have planned two new gardens:
1. Privacy planting fronting the house. The road salt abused the arborvitae, so I'm planting salt-tolerants in front of them. I've transplanted so far roses, rose of sharon and juniper, but I still have to plant more juniper, native roses etc. My mantra for that area is Salt tolerance, beauty and privacy. I'm still planning, and the goal is to finish before winter.

2. Privacy planting on the south side of the property. I love my neighbors, but I like to jog, garden and (once I can afford to put in the biopool) go swimming in private. I'm planning a multi-layered evergreen privacy planting that I should complete by May.

I have some fruit trees and forsythia already on that side, so I'm intending to layer larger juniper, arborvitae and holly bushes to screen the field. Then on my side, the current plan is to put in some serviceberry and other native edibles, as well as some hydrangea and wintergreen so it looks kind of woodland-ish, but a little formal.

I'm also considering putting some little paths in between. Since I've planted more trees than any woman should have to (I'm going to have manhands soon ewwww), I'm going to have a nursery put in the big plants.

Since I'm making it into a "garden" I will still have to outline the area by removing the sod, put down cardboard or paper liner, and a ton of mulch. The plan is to have the outline include the existing plants and look beautiful instead of the way it looks now.

The area's far from the house, so I'll have to buy some more hoses, and I'll probably be watering all summer, but I really can't wait until fall to get those guys going. So far, I've drawn a plan, but I need to get started this week with the sod removal.

Anyway, I used your post to share ALL my garden plans, but I feel no remorse.
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Old 04-09-2011, 05:05 AM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,157,970 times
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And you should not feel any remorse. So many people fail to get past the planning stage whereas you are getting things done, and your hands very dirty. I always loved the doers of this world. Good for you!!!
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