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Old 05-08-2011, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
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We have a pasture about a half block from our house - upwind, too, not that we ever smell them since it's a pretty big pasture and these are beef cattle so they don't have the daily routine of being in a small milking yard. However, this time of year I think they are either stocking the pasture with wean offs (calves being weaned off from drinking their mother's milk) or taking the wean offs out of the pasture and whoever is over there moos a lot in the late afternoons and part of the night. They are aways away so they aren't loud, but if they were right next to your house, there may be several weeks out of the year when there are a lot of calves complaining about having to eat grass instead of drinking milk. Or mom cows (which is a redundant term, technically) complaining about their babies being elsewhere.
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Old 05-09-2011, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Minnysoda
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ripley6174 View Post
What a complete load of rubbish and a twisted view of animals to boot. Maybe not everyone sees animals as a product for people to use and eat? Several of my neighbours have or had cows and they're the most gentle animals I've ever seen.
See this exactly what I meant by changing to fit your environment not changing your environment to fit you Take that mentality from the city to Montana or Wyoming or even here in out state Minnesota and see how far it gets you.....
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Old 05-09-2011, 03:21 PM
 
Location: zone 5
7,329 posts, read 13,548,306 times
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Originally Posted by imcurious View Post
Why do they stare?
I've wondered this my whole life. Even if you're just driving by they always stare. (I love cows.)
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Old 05-09-2011, 10:37 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma(formerly SoCalif) Originally Mich,
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TZBMC View Post
Thanks again for the continued comments/insight. I ended up putting an offer in on the house the was accepted- yipee! Decided just to go for it as I love the house, the location is only 5 minutes from work and from what the locals say, they keep the numbers in that herd constant as there is a separate university dairy farm on the other side of town.

Just wanted to add that I never had any intention of touching/feeding the cows and will admire them from afar. As I like to do a lot of things outside (gardening, reading, etc.), I'm sure the cows and I will be seeing a lot of each other... and I'm perfectly contented to "get to know them" from a distance. It seems like it will be nice having them around!

Thank you again for all of the help!
I was raised on a Dairy Farm in NW Michigan.
None of our cattle were seperated.The milking cows all had ear tags. as do most research cattle.
We sold our milk to Kraft.
We had Holsteins(black and white) Gernsey's (brown and white) Jersy's(light reddish brown) and Charolais (cream colored)
If your house is 100 ft" or more from the fence line, the smell shouldn't be a problem. This was most likely considered when the house was built.
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Old 05-10-2011, 07:15 AM
 
Location: Nebraska
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Originally Posted by my54ford View Post
See this exactly what I meant by changing to fit your environment not changing your environment to fit you Take that mentality from the city to Montana or Wyoming or even here in out state Minnesota and see how far it gets you.....
Perhaps you missed the part that Texas Horse Lady is from Texas, or that I live in Nebraska where everyone around me raises Angus beef for food production. (I raise the Dexters for my own.) Yet I have seen hardened cowboys and ranchers cry when they lose a calf, and seen them work all night during ice storms and blizzards to pull difficult calves from the womb so that they and the mothers don't die. The people who actually and truly care for the animals and their well-being usually have the best production levels; their animals are less stressed, produce more milk, are beefier and more sturdy, and the breeding animals live longer and are more prolific. I'm sorry you haven't been exposed to that aspect of cattle husbandry.
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Old 05-10-2011, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,487 posts, read 38,399,828 times
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Originally Posted by SCGranny View Post
Perhaps you missed the part that Texas Horse Lady is from Texas, or that I live in Nebraska where everyone around me raises Angus beef for food production. (I raise the Dexters for my own.) Yet I have seen hardened cowboys and ranchers cry when they lose a calf, and seen them work all night during ice storms and blizzards to pull difficult calves from the womb so that they and the mothers don't die. The people who actually and truly care for the animals and their well-being usually have the best production levels; their animals are less stressed, produce more milk, are beefier and more sturdy, and the breeding animals live longer and are more prolific. I'm sorry you haven't been exposed to that aspect of cattle husbandry.
Exactly. And I'm surrounded on most sides by the pastures of Capitol Land & Livestock who are not only one of the largest livestock dealers in the country (usually first or second largest in terms of handling cattle on any given day - and their wranglers use horses, not ATV's, for moving the cattle) but who have custom feeding programs, and also the pastures of many of the people who provide them with stock. And was raised in the country in East Texas, and my parents were dairy farmers and my husband's uncle was a dairy farmer, so it's not like I'm completely clueless as to the attitude of cattle raisers towards their stock. Not all name all of them (for one thing, they'd run out of names!), but they aren't considered just a product - and that makes for better beef, when it comes right down to it, a better product, if you will.
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Old 05-12-2011, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Minnysoda
8,831 posts, read 8,710,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCGranny View Post
Perhaps you missed the part that Texas Horse Lady is from Texas, or that I live in Nebraska where everyone around me raises Angus beef for food production. (I raise the Dexters for my own.) Yet I have seen hardened cowboys and ranchers cry when they lose a calf, and seen them work all night during ice storms and blizzards to pull difficult calves from the womb so that they and the mothers don't die. The people who actually and truly care for the animals and their well-being usually have the best production levels; their animals are less stressed, produce more milk, are beefier and more sturdy, and the breeding animals live longer and are more prolific. I'm sorry you haven't been exposed to that aspect of cattle husbandry.

Nope guess not, Other than some pratical experiance milking 35 hd twice a day untill I was 18 I don't know jack about cows.......Guess I'll go leave the gate open because I theres no way I know enough these calves to market
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Old 05-12-2011, 12:39 PM
Status: "Appalled" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Texas or Cascais, Portugal
3,567 posts, read 3,312,026 times
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Purchasing a house next door to cows would be a positive for me. I miss living next door to cows; miss the smell, the free fertilizer and have always been intrigued by their different personalities. And no matter how old I get, when I see a herd of cattle who (in unison) all turn their heads to stare with the same expression, it still cracks me up. I used to photograph cows just for their expression and those soulful eyes. Hope some day to either have a few or be neighbors with them again!
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Old 05-12-2011, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,487 posts, read 38,399,828 times
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Originally Posted by my54ford View Post
Nope guess not, Other than some pratical experiance milking 35 hd twice a day untill I was 18 I don't know jack about cows.......Guess I'll go leave the gate open because I theres no way I know enough these calves to market
Now, see, if someone disagrees with your statement about the attitudes people who raise cattle and live and work with them on a daily basis, and do it from a basis of personal experience with such, you decide that that means you're being told you don't know anything about cows.

Could be a lack of basic understanding of people, not cows, at work here.
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Old 05-12-2011, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma(formerly SoCalif) Originally Mich,
13,387 posts, read 16,961,289 times
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Originally Posted by nurider2002 View Post
Purchasing a house next door to cows would be a positive for me. I miss living next door to cows; miss the smell, the free fertilizer and have always been intrigued by their different personalities. And no matter how old I get, when I see a herd of cattle who (in unison) all turn their heads to stare with the same expression, it still cracks me up. I used to photograph cows just for their expression and those soulful eyes. Hope some day to either have a few or be neighbors with them again!
Move to Oklahoma where we allow cattle farms inside the city limits.

Or go see if Wal-Mart sells air freheners with a Barn Yard aroma.
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