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Old 05-12-2011, 09:59 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
23,481 posts, read 41,072,462 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mkfarnam View Post
Now, I would buy that in bulk.
I lived next to an Alfalfa Pellet mill, I have had a lifetime supply of that air-freshener.

As well as plenty of dairy cows ("Dairy farm boarding school" )

Caring for pastured 'feeders' was pretty simple. (Excluding some of those blizzard nights on the prairie).

Where I am currently located, many folks buy / rent / borrow cows for the 'growing season'.
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Old 05-12-2011, 11:48 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma(formerly SoCalif) Originally Mich,
13,387 posts, read 16,961,289 times
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Correction:

I said in an earler post that our Cows weren't seperated from the rest. But that's not exactly true.
In the mornings after milking, the Milking cows were sent to the greenest pasture. At night after milking, they were fed fresh cut-n-bailed Alfalfa and
grain or corn with molasses, and were kept in the barn all night, either in Stanchions or in the barn yard(s).

Last edited by mkfarnam; 05-12-2011 at 11:56 PM..
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Old 05-13-2011, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
4,123 posts, read 5,437,679 times
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Here's some more information from a friend of mine...

http://www.acresusa.com/toolbox/repr...CowCulture.pdf
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Old 05-13-2011, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Mayacama Mtns in CA
14,523 posts, read 7,677,685 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slamont61 View Post
Here's some more information from a friend of mine...

http://www.acresusa.com/toolbox/repr...CowCulture.pdf
That is fascinating! Thanks for linking to it.
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Old 05-13-2011, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Not on the same page as most
2,503 posts, read 5,626,861 times
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I love this thread. Interesting links, and observations. We have had five beef cows for a year now. They appear to recognize people, and even seem to recognize my car! Our cows are "all about" range cubes. That is like candy to them.

They even seem to have different moos for different occasions. They have a special soft low moo, moo, moo for their calves, and a loud boisterous mooooooo when they see a bucket of grain. I've heard our neighbor's cow moo until she was hoarse, for her weaned calf. They seem to really love their babies.
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Old 05-17-2011, 08:51 AM
 
418 posts, read 1,063,920 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by my54ford View Post
Nope guess not, Other than some pratical experiance milking 35 hd twice a day untill I was 18 I don't know jack about cows.......Guess I'll go leave the gate open because I theres no way I know enough these calves to market
Good response. I understand what you meant about city/country mentality and agree with you.
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Old 06-13-2011, 05:26 PM
 
Location: South of Maine
739 posts, read 864,034 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tambre View Post
I love this thread. Interesting links, and observations. We have had five beef cows for a year now. They appear to recognize people, and even seem to recognize my car! Our cows are "all about" range cubes. That is like candy to them.

They even seem to have different moos for different occasions. They have a special soft low moo, moo, moo for their calves, and a loud boisterous mooooooo when they see a bucket of grain. I've heard our neighbor's cow moo until she was hoarse, for her weaned calf. They seem to really love their babies.

...reminds me of the far-Side cartoon of the carfull of cows driving by a man in the field, and the cows are yelling out the window "Yakity ***! Yakity ***!"
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Old 06-14-2011, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 73,628,153 times
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You cow folk will get a kick out of this video. Enjoy


YouTube - ‪Funny Cow Video‬‏
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Old 06-16-2011, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Not on the same page as most
2,503 posts, read 5,626,861 times
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Love it! Happy Texan. That Far Side cartoon sounds funny, too round tuit.
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Old 06-16-2011, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Middle America
37,143 posts, read 43,058,077 times
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Awwww. I grew up on 80 acres, where about 50 head of black angus grazed...with that much space, no smells to speak of.
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