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Old 12-05-2011, 12:23 AM
 
Location: Homer Alaska
1,055 posts, read 1,549,332 times
Reputation: 847

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ktaadin View Post
I apologize reviving a dead thread by writing this, but my perspective has changed lately since I moved to a large city from my small town shortly after starting this post and I think it would make a good update.

There are some things about the rural area that I find I miss very much. Number one is simply having nature around. I guess I took it for granted, but when I've gone home to visit I realize just how much I missed trees, rocks, water etc. Space in general. Free parking! There is a definite ease of living in rural areas compared to city living.

It's true that the city offers more in the way of career and educational opportunities, nightlife, shopping etc but I've found that I'm not able to use alot of these opportunities as much as I'd like because my new job here consumes so much of my time. I've done a few things and it's not been all bad, but getting settled and honestly feeling like this place is "home" has been a challenge. I've reached the point that I plan to live here and do this job for a few years then move on. The most difficult part of the city environment is the stress of dealing with my car (parking, driving, vandalism etc).

I don't have any kids and still couldn't comment on raising them in one environment vs the other, but I can say this experience has made me think. I can see why a small 1BR right downtown might have some downsides that I did not see earlier for a family.
It seems like you have learned a valuable lesson on the up/down side of greener pastures. One thing I have learned is that whenever you move to a new area it takes time, sometimes a lengthy time to settle in and have it feel like home. I have found perversly over many moves that I often didn't realize how much my "new" home had become my home, until it was time to move on. Good luck to you.
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Old 12-05-2011, 02:02 AM
 
Location: Due North of Potemkin City Limits
1,237 posts, read 1,664,286 times
Reputation: 1131
Always check out the [domain blocked due to spam] forum for any small town you'd ever think about relocating to. It's a non-moderated online bulletin board. The board for the town that I grew up in is littered with personal attacks and anonymous hate-filled rants. Mostly "this woman's a ****, this guy's cheating on his wife" type garbage. It's a pretty accurate representation of the town actually, and it paints a pretty accurate picture of the people in it. Some of the boards for small towns are worse than others, and some have very little gossipy discussion at all. The boards respectively follows the real-life feel of communities which they represent, and I could see how they'd greatly aid someone who's thinking of moving to a tiny town that would get little to no informative discussion on C-D.
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Old 12-06-2011, 04:17 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
34,438 posts, read 43,286,441 times
Reputation: 44085

John Mellencamp - Small Town - YouTube
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Old 07-04-2013, 09:13 AM
 
2,349 posts, read 4,562,704 times
Reputation: 2973
Quote:
Originally Posted by ktaadin View Post
Okay, why do you think that parents feel that raising kids in a small town provides them with a better environment to grow up in? I often hear parents (including well-off ones who could afford good private schools) say things like "we don't want to raise our children in that environment [the city]."

As a kid I was raised in a town of 5,000, about 2 1/2 hours from the nearest real city. Throughout most of my growing up years, I wanted nothing more than for my parents to move us to an area near or in a bigger city.

Trying to be objective, I just don't feel that the trade-offs are really worth it:

Pros of rural area:
-less pollution
-less crime
-possibly better schools on average, depending upon the rural area in question

Pros of urban area:
-much wider network of potential friends to socialize with
-wider array of activities available to try
-more and more varied jobs for teens
-greater diversity in the community
-better "high end" schools if the kid can get in: eg the average public HS in North Dakota might be better than the average NYC public school, but you're not likely to find places like Stuyvesant in North Dakota.

I realize my own biases probably come through in making this comparison, but it's an honest question to those parents who specifically wanted to raise their children in a small town. Why did you feel that the trade-off was worth it?
Probably OK.

Some of the good things:

Less traffic for the parents, less stress at home.
Maybe less taxes for the parents, again, less stress at home.


Some of the negatives:

Dad loses his job, is there another job available without moving?
Kids get older, less options for hanging out?
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Old 07-04-2013, 12:44 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
25,950 posts, read 42,477,697 times
Reputation: 30047
Quote:
Originally Posted by ktaadin View Post
Okay, why do you think that parents feel that raising kids in a small town provides them with a better environment to grow up in? I often hear parents (including well-off ones who could afford good private schools) say things like "we don't want to raise our children in that environment [the city]."
I do not know why they feel that way.

We lived in a small town with a population less than 10,000 for eleven years. Our two children graduated from the local high school. One child moved away within a year of graduating to a major city (New York City) and 20+ years later has no regrets. The other child eventually moved to a major city over 1,000 miles away.

There are good and bad points of living in rural and small town living. I saw teenagers who made something of their lives and I saw others who just leeched off the family as much as they could. We decided are dream house in a rural small town is not what we really wanted. So we also moved to a larger city in an urban area... Ten plus years later, we re-evaluated, and decided to stay in a larger city.
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Old 07-05-2013, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,144 posts, read 50,304,308 times
Reputation: 19844
I attended a highschool that had around 3,500 students. It is in a farming community, a city of 80,000, where the highschool serves the entire county.

There was a lot of over-crowding, and many cliches.

A lot of us slipped through the cracks. My guidance counselor met me for the first time when I had one semester to go before graduating. It seemed that she had neglected to tell me that I was missing a required course, so it caused some last minute stress.

At graduation the line-up was very long. I did not know anyone in the line near me. As far as I could tell at the time, I had never seen any of the people in line with me. But there was over 750 seniors, and with my last name I was placed in a section where very few of them spoke much English.

That kind of summed highschool for me. None of my teachers knew my name, I attended classes, I got good grades and I worked fulltime to support myself.

I never knew anyone on the yearbook committee, so my photo was never included in the yearbooks. I thought it was interesting that my senior yearbook had two full pages of names at the end of students that the committee had forgotten to include pictures of. I did not realize until our 25th re-union that there were a lot more of us, whose pictures where not included, then were even listed in the back.

A few hundred of us have made 'friends' on Facebook. We still see the ex-football players, the ex-basket ball players, the ex-cheer leaders, drama club, on and on. And there is a few dozen of us whose pictures never appeared and were never listed in the yearbooks. Thirty years later, it still makes for awkward conversation. Some were/are connected to cliches and they had representation, the rest of us drifted through their space.



Our son graduated from a highschool with less than 100 graduating seniors. The total student population was around 350.

He knew the name of every student he graduated with. We met his teachers, and every teacher knew our son's name. Every teacher recognized our son. I doubt if they were all friends, but they were not strangers.

Everyone was included in his yearbook, and it looked like everyone signed each other's yearbooks.

Our son had an entirely different highschool experience than what I had.

I see a huge difference between small highschools and large highschools.
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Old 08-10-2013, 11:41 AM
 
1 posts, read 830 times
Reputation: 10
Just wondering if this post is still active. We have three young kids and live in a community of about 50,000. We're considering moving back to the small town where I grew up (population 700). There are so many things that worry me about raising city boys (lost connection to nature, not really getting where food comes from, relying on others for entertainment, etc). But I also worry about the small town life (lack of diversity, conservative politics and religious views, focus on sports etc).

If anyone has more advise to share I'm a happy for different perspectives.
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Old 08-10-2013, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Eastern Kentucky
1,237 posts, read 2,760,033 times
Reputation: 1290
Each has it's pro's and con's. For me, I didn't like to lock the doors of my car when it was parked in my driveway, everybody having to keep up with a house key, and knowing that if my kids were caught in the wrong company or doing the wrong thing, I would hear from the police instead of the neighbors.
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Old 08-11-2013, 12:44 PM
 
2,569 posts, read 2,608,430 times
Reputation: 4409
Quote:
Originally Posted by smbynum View Post
Just wondering if this post is still active. We have three young kids and live in a community of about 50,000. We're considering moving back to the small town where I grew up (population 700). There are so many things that worry me about raising city boys (lost connection to nature, not really getting where food comes from, relying on others for entertainment, etc). But I also worry about the small town life (lack of diversity, conservative politics and religious views, focus on sports etc).

If anyone has more advise to share I'm a happy for different perspectives.
My kids learned to be very tolerant by living and schooling in a small town. It was so small that had there been a clique, it would have been a clique of one! They interacted with everyone, regardless of age, physical appearance or ability, net worth, language, political views. We always had a druggie or two drift through, and the kids saw what losers they were, and how self-centered and intolerant.

They learned that shared work can be fun. That simple entertainments are often fine. We did make trips to a metro area 6 hours away once a year, and also went to a coastal area yearly, so they got to see those things.

For one of the senior trips, two teachers took the six graduates to San Diego, CA. They went to museums, took a boat trip up the coast, and, served in a soup kitchen a couple days and crossed the border for a day trip. Someone tried to grab one of the students in SD and the other five kids beat them off her. One teacher call 911, the other jotted down a description, which resulted in... nothing.

I met a VISTA volunteer from Long Island while in western Nebraska once. He said the best thing about his experience was meeting so many different kinds of people. Said that back home he could isolate himself to those in his economic, age, and interest group, and avoid anyone different. I agree!

My point is that it may take effort to give your kids a well-rounded experience regardless of where one lives, but there are real benefits to small town living.
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