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Old 08-11-2011, 07:31 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,147 posts, read 50,318,661 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RedJacket View Post
Rural America now accounts for just 16 percent of the nation's population, the lowest ever.
The latest 2010 census numbers hint at an emerging America where, by midcentury, city boundaries become indistinct and rural areas grow ever less relevant. Many communities could shrink to virtual ghost towns as they shutter businesses and close down schools, demographers say.

News from The Associated Press (http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_CENSUS_RURAL_AMERICA?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPL ATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2011-07-28-00-02-47 - broken link)

Sad but true. Small town after small town is biting the dust. There's a number of reasons for it, but NAFTA certainly helped to kill off many small factory towns. My mothers was one of them.
I would interpret this in the opposite manner.

'Rural' means low population density. When vast regions lose population it makes them more rural.

Our nation's rural area are in fact growing.

If a rural area got more people it would no longer be rural it would become urban.



I see nothing 'wrong' with rural areas, losing population density. It simply makes then more rural.

I like rural
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Old 08-11-2011, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,147 posts, read 50,318,661 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
In many ways, large cities are actually MORE energy efficient than rural areas.

New York City is the most energy efficient city in the US. Why? People there live in the most energy efficient homes you could have--high rise apartments & condos. People in NYC also don't drive anywhere near as much as in the rest of America. Walking, biking, and mass transit are much more energy efficient than private automobiles.
I disagree.

An urban community is not self-supporting. It can not generate it's own food, fuel nor homes. Everything must be shipped in, at great expense and consumption of fuel.
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Old 08-11-2011, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,147 posts, read 50,318,661 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
You missed the point completely. Those big cities actually use LESS petroleum on a per capita basis than rural areas do.
I don't think so.

I think they use more.
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Old 08-12-2011, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,147 posts, read 50,318,661 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DSOs View Post
Let's look @ the thread title closely--Rural US disappearing? Population share hits low. The effort(s) to increase/fix the rural depopulation is what's making the small towns disappear!

The depopulation is not what's hurting the small towns IMO, it's the isolation to/from the bigger cities. Nimble high speed rail could counteract this problem.
Rural areas are growing, and you wish to bring more urbanites out to small towns via HSR?

I don't think so.

Our township has 250 people, I do not see how bringing HSR into this state would 'help' the picture.
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Old 08-13-2011, 06:18 AM
 
1,097 posts, read 3,619,843 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
I disagree.

An urban community is not self-supporting. It can not generate it's own food, fuel nor homes. Everything must be shipped in, at great expense and consumption of fuel.
All communities have to have SOME things shipped in. Most of us in the midwest are surrounded by corn and beans, hogs, chickens and beef, but we still like to eat fish, fruits and vegetables that aren't, and can't be, locally grown. Because of economies of scale, it is more efficient to ship goods to cities.

People in rural areas tend to drive greater distances, and they predominately live in single-family homes instead of multifamily units. SF homes are more expensive to heat and cool.
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Old 08-13-2011, 06:49 AM
 
2,878 posts, read 3,926,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Naptowner View Post
All communities have to have SOME things shipped in. Most of us in the midwest are surrounded by corn and beans, hogs, chickens and beef, but we still like to eat fish, fruits and vegetables that aren't, and can't be, locally grown. Because of economies of scale, it is more efficient to ship goods to cities.

People in rural areas tend to drive greater distances, and they predominately live in single-family homes instead of multifamily units. SF homes are more expensive to heat and cool.
In Eastern Europe it was very common to have "central heat" in the cities - this was basically a system of pipes going from a number of "central locations", distributing hot water through radiators to everyone living in apartment buildings or single family homes. You pay a monthly fee and have heat. Same with hot and cold water and electricity...

OD
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Old 08-13-2011, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Naptowner View Post
All communities have to have SOME things shipped in.
Some communities are able to thrive with only luxury items being imported, not essentials.
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Old 08-13-2011, 10:30 PM
 
Location: IN
21,111 posts, read 36,604,638 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ognend View Post
In Eastern Europe it was very common to have "central heat" in the cities - this was basically a system of pipes going from a number of "central locations", distributing hot water through radiators to everyone living in apartment buildings or single family homes. You pay a monthly fee and have heat. Same with hot and cold water and electricity...

OD
Yes, that would be steam heat. I know that Concord, NH has steam heat for the entire downtown area that includes both commercial and residential buildings in the vicinity. Winters there are colder than most areas of eastern Europe with occasional minimums sometimes colder than -30C.
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Old 08-14-2011, 07:11 AM
 
Location: MMU->ABE->ATL->ASH
9,171 posts, read 17,548,042 times
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Some older major City have them, But what you need to go along with the steam plant is the Electric side. The steam is the waste heat left over from making Power. To "heat" the Core part of town, near the plant can be done. But doing it now would be next to impossible now, The NIMBY would never allow the power plants (any) Gas, Coal, Oil, to be built, and the land needed would also be very hard to get. Rip up all the streets to put in the piping. And in extrerm cold days there is not enought Steam output, so the home/biz have to go to there own Supplemental system to add more heat. If you need to pay to put in a supplemental system, Why bother connecting to the steam system. Also if 1 steam generation plant is making the steam and it goes off-line for any reason, you need to have a system that is able to make all the heat. and the cost for that system.
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Old 08-14-2011, 08:32 AM
 
1,097 posts, read 3,619,843 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
Some communities are able to thrive with only luxury items being imported, not essentials.
I guess it depends on what you consider a luxury item. In most of the country, fresh vegetables and fruit have to be shipped in for all but a month or two of the year, and some kinds of produce and crops simply can't be grown at all because of the climate.
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