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Old 07-28-2011, 09:24 PM
 
Location: 112 Ocean Avenue
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Rural America now accounts for just 16 percent of the nation's population, the lowest ever.
The latest 2010 census numbers hint at an emerging America where, by midcentury, city boundaries become indistinct and rural areas grow ever less relevant. Many communities could shrink to virtual ghost towns as they shutter businesses and close down schools, demographers say.

News from The Associated Press (http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_CENSUS_RURAL_AMERICA?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPL ATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2011-07-28-00-02-47 - broken link)

Sad but true. Small town after small town is biting the dust. There's a number of reasons for it, but NAFTA certainly helped to kill off many small factory towns. My mothers was one of them.
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Old 07-28-2011, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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I grew up rurally in the agricultural belt, loved it, and will buy a rural spread someday, no doubt.

This story was being discussed on NPR this morning, and they mentioned that the stats are somewhat skewed due to fairly undefined reporting of many places that are ambiguous in character...think one person's small town being another person's suburb, etc. So the figures are a little bit slanted. But it's inevitable that small, remotely located communities are losing population. It's very difficult for them to support a workforce, particularly an educated one. I moved back to my small hometown through much of my twenties to take a job at the newspaper. It was one of the ONLY jobs available for a person with a degree.
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Old 07-28-2011, 09:58 PM
 
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Quite a stark comparison from the linked article:
Quote:
The share of people in rural areas over the past decade fell to 16 percent, passing the previous low of 20 percent in 2000. The rural share is expected to drop further as the U.S. population balloons from 309 million to 400 million by midcentury, leading people to crowd cities and suburbs and fill in the open spaces around them.

In 1910, the population share of rural America was 72 percent. Such areas remained home to a majority of Americans until 1950, amid post-World War II economic expansion and the baby boom.
The passing of the railroads for transportation and the interstates went far in killing off rural America. Medical care is a real problem and getting less accessible all the time. What care is accessable is often sub-standard with a real language barrier from foreign medical students and people coming from mostly agrarian counties.
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Old 07-28-2011, 10:17 PM
 
Location: 112 Ocean Avenue
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I was born in '62 and we lived in several rural small towns, but there was still a dentist, doctor, and other necessities close by. Of course, the days of a family doctor and dentist are a thing of the past.

My mom had a running tab at a local grocery store and paid her bill at the end of the month. My dad was in the service and got paid once a month so it wasn't a problem with our small town grocer.

Man oh man, I feel so old just writing about things like that.
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Old 07-29-2011, 06:22 AM
 
Location: The Woods
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I foresee energy issues, among others, decimating the large cities at some point in the future. So I'm not too concerned over this...
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Old 07-29-2011, 06:44 AM
 
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Originally Posted by lifelongMOgal View Post
Quite a stark comparison from the linked article:


The passing of the railroads for transportation and the interstates went far in killing off rural America. Medical care is a real problem and getting less accessible all the time. What care is accessable is often sub-standard with a real language barrier from foreign medical students and people coming from mostly agrarian counties.
Doctors born in United States want to earn $400K per year, drive a Mercedes, have a trophy wife and vacation in Hawaii. They don't want to stay in some tiny rural town where they'll make $50K per year. Medical school nowadays is not about medicine anymore, it is about management and business. You are lucky if your doctor gives you more than 10 minutes of his precious time. It used to be that the doctor would come to your house because part of taking care of a patient and figuring out what the problem is, is seeing where and how they live. Today's a**hole doctors are too stupid, lazy and disinterested for all that. I hope I never end up in their hands as the vast majority of them are completely incompetent and borderline dangerous.

My $.02
OD
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Old 07-29-2011, 06:46 AM
 
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Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
I foresee energy issues, among others, decimating the large cities at some point in the future. So I'm not too concerned over this...
That's why technology progresses, to solve the problems such as the one you foresee.

OD
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Old 07-29-2011, 08:39 AM
 
29,988 posts, read 37,772,964 times
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Originally Posted by ognend View Post
Doctors born in United States want to earn $400K per year, drive a Mercedes, have a trophy wife and vacation in Hawaii. They don't want to stay in some tiny rural town where they'll make $50K per year. Medical school nowadays is not about medicine anymore, it is about management and business. You are lucky if your doctor gives you more than 10 minutes of his precious time. It used to be that the doctor would come to your house because part of taking care of a patient and figuring out what the problem is, is seeing where and how they live. Today's a**hole doctors are too stupid, lazy and disinterested for all that. I hope I never end up in their hands as the vast majority of them are completely incompetent and borderline dangerous.

My $.02
OD
Painting with a pretty wide brush there. It is difficult to repay loans from 12 years of schooling working in a rural community alone. I would hope it would be plausible for some of the state university medical schools to help forgive a portion of loans for every year served in a rural community. I know such programs are used for some public service professions and in rural communities accessibility to medical professionals is every bit as important as law enforcement (if not more).
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Old 07-29-2011, 11:20 AM
 
221 posts, read 1,044,380 times
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Yeah, those are the stats, but . . .

Have you noticed on City-Data how many people are longing for the rural life? Of course there are the die-hard urbanites, but it seems to me that both on-line and in the real world there are so many many people who want to "get back" to that imaginary Mayberry.

So I keep thinking that maybe the future will bring a change to more people choosing a less affluent life in rural America.

And the current health care system is bound to change, ya'll - one way or another.
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Old 07-29-2011, 01:25 PM
 
2,878 posts, read 3,926,100 times
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Originally Posted by lifelongMOgal View Post
Painting with a pretty wide brush there. It is difficult to repay loans from 12 years of schooling working in a rural community alone. I would hope it would be plausible for some of the state university medical schools to help forgive a portion of loans for every year served in a rural community. I know such programs are used for some public service professions and in rural communities accessibility to medical professionals is every bit as important as law enforcement (if not more).
My wife is a veterinarian and she has the same loans as the MDs but she will never make even 1/2 of the money they do. I have had nothing but bad experiences with MDs from the do-not-care attitude to the don't-know-what-I-am-doing misfortune. This is one field where everyone can be a judge of the quality of care they receive. Either way, the whole system is structured in such a way that people going to medical school expect to pay a lot and earn a lot more. When you have it that way, it's only downhill from there and it is no wonder many rural areas have no doctors or poor quality ones.

OD
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