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Old 10-10-2018, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Southwest, USA
240 posts, read 77,413 times
Reputation: 500

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I'd advise not to leave your day job and to start small. As Oldtrader says, the cost of land is enormously huge. If you can overcome this obstacle, the next step is to find a reliable water source. This is becoming more and more difficult in these drought stricken days. Last, secure a buyer to buy your produce before you plant. I suggest joining a farming co-op if you want to quickly get rid of your produce. Once you harvest, you will have more produce than you care for, and the crows, rodents, insects, and wildlife will all want a part of it.

Some possible strategies:
1. Sell organic sweet potatoes to Europe. There is a company in the midwest that thrives from this strategy. The owner claims that Europe has a huge demand for sweet potatoes.

2. Figure out what the locals like and specialize in it. This could be herbal tea, spices, etc. The locals in my area do not like veggies, so I ended up with a crap-load of unsold squash one year. Melons and tree fruits (peaches & apples) tend to sell quickly...must be the sweet tooth.

3. Note that meat is expensive to produce. You grow the crop that feeds the animal (ie: cows), and the animal grows at a certain rate, drinks lots of water, etc, etc. Rabbits may be the exception to this rule. Rabbits eat little, produce fertilizer that can be freshly applied to the crops without acid burning their roots, and they multiply like, well rabbits, lol. I see a slight (very slight) uptick in demand for rabbit meat. Americans are starting to realize it's non-fat and healthy.

4. Sell goat soap and goat cheese. This seems to be a popular choice. Personally, I hate the smell of goats, lol.

5. Do not invest in anything exported to China. With Trump's trade war and high tariffs, consider the Chinese market closed. Soybean farmers are really hurting this year. Unless you like to gamble, and you're willing to bet that the trade war will end soon, scratch all Chinese exports off your list. Interesting sidenote...the price of new tractors correlate to the price of corn and soybeans. Now that soybean prices have dropped, I bet the prices of new tractors will drop. It could be a good time to buy.

6. Note that the US imports a lot of fruits and veggies from Mexico and South America. These countries have a lower capital to labor ratio than the US, and they can easily specialize in fruits and veggies. Competing with these countries will keep your prices and profits down.

7. Build a greenhouse and sell out of season produce. I read about a guy making lots of money by selling high priced tomatoes in winter. Homegrown tomatoes taste much better than store bought. The richness and depth of flavor far exceeds something that's picked green and tastes like wallpaper.


The greatest wealth you will find is not monetary. A wise man once said that when you cultivate and work the earth, you cultivate yourself. At most, you can produce your own food and get away from our awful American food that's loaded with sodium, synthetic sugars, transfats, antibiotics, processed starches, chemicals, GMO's (frankenfoods), etc.
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Old 10-10-2018, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,148 posts, read 50,323,277 times
Reputation: 19854
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnappleApple View Post
I'd advise not to leave your day job and to start small. As Oldtrader says, the cost of land is enormously huge.
Depends on where you locate. In some areas you can buy land for fairly cheap. I bought land at $350/acre, annual taxes cost me $1.05/acre.



Quote:
... If you can overcome this obstacle, the next step is to find a reliable water source. This is becoming more and more difficult in these drought stricken days.
This also depends. There are parts of the country that are very drought-prone, but other regions that have never had a recorded drought.

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Old 10-15-2018, 05:36 PM
Status: " down to just 2 old dogs" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Floyd Co, VA
3,429 posts, read 5,259,845 times
Reputation: 7294
A permaculture food forest can be achieved and be profitable:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4Rfnww4oHg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjR6P7F0KzM

Lots and lots of You Tube videos about the subject.
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Old 10-15-2018, 08:31 PM
 
Location: New York
849 posts, read 696,517 times
Reputation: 1573
^^^^ that guy above is awesome!!!! Basically grows all his own fruit and veggies in his modest backyard located in Nj.
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