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Old 11-08-2012, 11:34 PM
 
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Huge market for goats now. I recommend a good fence and dry lotting them rather than letting them roam and acreage.
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Old 11-10-2012, 05:54 AM
 
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Organic farming of micro greens and herbs. Goat farming and specialty cheese production.
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Old 11-19-2012, 10:25 AM
 
Location: North Western NJ
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please remember with cheese baked goods, canning ect pretty much selling ANY food based produt there will beALOT more rules...

in most states in order to sell any food based goods you MUST have a commerical inspected kitchen...if its in your house you cant haveany animals IN your home, so if youhaveindoor pets you haveto build a speate building for said comercial kitchen...
for selling cheees and milk in many states you also have to be a "grade A dairy" whihc means very specific milking equiptment set up procedures and pasturization process...

the selling of ANY food product in most states is NOT easy (im not sure how the amish get around the maority of these rules and regs...) and typically incredibly expensive to set up, because of that id avoid trying to do a "made food" based business and stick to none food product (soaps, live plants, fresh produce/dried herbs, flowers, ect.)

drylotting would never work for me, the cost of hauling in food and hay would far outweigh any profit from the offspring.

My dairy goats have acess ot all the brush, weeds fallen leaves ect they can and are happy to stay inside a 4 strand electric fence...MUCH heaper than heavy duty fences to keep unhappy animalson a dry lot (goats will always challenge fences if theres somethingyummy on the other side but not where they are. HAPPY goats dont need fortknox of fencing.
plus the cost to feed them is tiny when they can heavily suplient thier own diet with good greens (plus the meat and milk taste better...

But to each his own.
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Old 11-19-2012, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
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Truffles!?? or maybe ****ake mushrooms.
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Old 11-19-2012, 07:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleDolphin View Post
****ake mushrooms.
sh*take mushrooms
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:24 AM
 
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Is there even a strong market for food grown on small family farms? I imagine most mom and pop groceries, supermarkets, and restaurants get their products from large farming/ranching corporations.

Or do lots of these corporations supplement their supply by buying from small farmers too?
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
Is there even a strong market for food grown on small family farms? I imagine most mom and pop groceries, supermarkets, and restaurants get their products from large farming/ranching corporations.

Or do lots of these corporations supplement their supply by buying from small farmers too?
Farmer's markets and roadside stands do well in many areas. I try to buy all of my produce, honey, cider, wine, dairy from locals. Meat I'm having a harder time with since I just moved and haven't found any place local yet. I'm sure I will once our farmer's market opens in the spring again.

Some grocers do buy from local farms whenever things are in season. Most of the huge chains like Kroger don't. I know Kroger doesn't because I lived in SC and was surrounded by peach farms and all of our peaches came from Cali which made no freaking sense to me since I could drive less than 5 miles in any direction and hit a massive peach farm. Hannaford I know buys from local farms. They advertise the heck out of it.

Restaurants are tricky. Many want Sysco prices and want small orders and to place an order for a certain cut of beef on a Tuesday and expect it on Thursday. Processing doesn't work that way.

I know farms who travel 5-6 hours every day just to be in the farmer's markets in NYC. They also have farm stores locally, but the bulk of their business comes from NYC. Something else to think about if you're close to a large city.
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Old 11-20-2012, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
Is there even a strong market for food grown on small family farms? I imagine most mom and pop groceries, supermarkets, and restaurants get their products from large farming/ranching corporations.

Or do lots of these corporations supplement their supply by buying from small farmers too?
In addition to what ss20ts mentions, there are also additional licenses, permits, inspections and regulations when selling to a retail distributor or food service rather than direct-to-consumer. In many cases, those additional overheads make it cost prohibitive for small producers. A lot depends on the food laws in your state; but generally having a CSA or farmstand or farmers market is much easier.

Everywhere I've lived there has been a huge demand for local farm-fresh produce, but normally not enough producers or farmers markets to supply them all. Additionally, the costs of production from these small local farms isn't subsidized like commercial growers are, so they can't match the artificially low grocery store prices and remain in business. Luckily, many people understand this and don't begrudge paying extra for fresh local produce, but it does limit their patrons to those is in higher income brackets who can afford to spend more for food. I consider it a huge step forward that our state has finally allowed their food stamps to be used at the farmers markets, this lets lower income families enjoy fresh produce and goods (and improved health, in several cases).
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Old 11-20-2012, 07:54 PM
 
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Large Corporate growers get Subsidized, but small farmers dont? I find that strange.

Actually, I dont think farmers markets do all that well in NYC. There isnt really a big well known market here like the Reading Terminal market in the Ill-idelph (philly). There are whole foods and trader joes, and they are killing it. Do they buy from small farmers in upstate NY, Long Island, or amish country?

But there is an open air sidewalk market in flushing queens right off a major street, and flushing is a busy place. But they get no business. I have noticed some mom and pop organic natural groceries springing up in more working class nabes, and they are doing ok I guess. There is also a city wide chain called Associated. They are normally in the poorer districts and do lots of food stamp business. They are moving to organic natural.

Now there are corporations like Boars Head that has a line of natural or organic. You would have to be competing against them too.
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Old 11-20-2012, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
Large Corporate growers get Subsidized, but small farmers dont? I find that strange.
You're not the only one. There are so many aspects of the US Agriculture Policy (Farm Bills, etc) and the various subsidies, discounts and incentives available that truly favor large agri-businesses over small local producers. Mostly because they have less of a voice in legislation than the large corporations (i.e. less $$$$ for lobbying their interests), because they aren't growing as many of the subsidized crops (primarily feed and bio-fuels), and because they don't meet minimum production requirements for subsidized/discounted energy and water prices because they operate on a smaller scale. Couple that with regulations designed to "ensure food safety" in an extremely large-scale wide-area operation, but that are often unnecessary and cost-prohibitive for small local producers, and it results in many realities that border on anti-competitive practices by the few large agri-businesses that own the majority of farmland and food production facilities in the US.
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