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Old 09-02-2011, 04:37 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN (North Minneapolis area)
2,032 posts, read 4,378,163 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
So does anyone else feel my way?
Yes
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Old 09-02-2011, 11:34 AM
 
373 posts, read 555,886 times
Reputation: 243
Default Check out other cultures

Brazil, China, Russia, India, Singapore, Japan? Many people live very well there.

In many ways the USA is a second tier country. The news just does not show the freedoms and wealth outside the USA very well. It is kind of comical that people are shown eating from dumps and so on as common lifestyles. That is a distorted picture. We also have more people in prison per capita then anywhere on the planet.

Even Mexico is a often not a bad place to live for the smaller number of people who have money. They export ther surplus population here.

Life is really what you make it.

The retail sector is quite sophisticated here. But there is not much in the way of a productive manufacturing sector to support it over the longer term. But it will be around, just look at how much many people in the 3rd world and old eastern block really do buy. You can even meet them and pal around at some schools.

I have been in the home of the ceo of one of the companies you mentioned. Paintings on the plaster, not much in the way of chain store items there.

Going to thrift shop can be handy for people starting out in life. It can be a trick to leverage resources. I had motorcycle, a cool car, a private residence, and traveled in the USA and abroad, and no debt on graduation. Many more post 60's middle class people tend to be squemish about what they do. You can break taboos and be rewarded.
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Old 09-03-2011, 07:02 AM
 
1,891 posts, read 2,295,430 times
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What a bunch of garbage. No wonder the OP is crabby, he's a spoiled sissy.
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Old 09-03-2011, 10:43 AM
 
Location: North Western NJ
6,591 posts, read 21,269,892 times
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op, sounds like YOU want to live closer to a big city, sounds like your more concerned with the latest fashion, chainn stores and such and you like the hussle and bussle...
so GO!
its that simple...why would you feel the need to ask if anyone else feels the same...

we ALL know, some people prefer rural, others preferthe city, and the rest fall anywhere in between...
for me, living in the city would be HELL, i never shop name brand stores, i never pay full retail and happily shop thrift...
living suburban isnt for me either, i hate worrying that i cant do certain things because the town wont allow it ect..
im a country girl at heart and i dont think that will ever change, so NO...i cant say i feel the same as you...
but what does it matter...
if your one of those city folks who likes the constant go, the bright lights and tall buildings, then thats whaere you should put yourself.
especially if mommy and daddy are paying for your schooling, take the cash, get your butt back to school and find a little apartment or on campus living in the area you want to be in...if you still love that lifestyle in a few years once youve finnished schol make a home in that kind of area...

for me living life means LIVING it...if your version if LIVING s big buildings big brands and big lights, then go for it!
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Old 09-03-2011, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Middle America
37,143 posts, read 43,070,821 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
Yes, many whites get too sheltered and get too much in a shell. They don't know what some white folks go through or how hard life is a new immigrant or non-caucasian living in a primary caucasian area.
YOU actually seem like a person who is too sheltered and too much in a shell, given that you seem to feel that happiness can only be found in suburban chain restaurants and retail. I wouldn't spend a lot of time knocking others for being "too sheltered" when it appears that you're seeking to embrace the very essence of a sheltered existence.
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Old 09-03-2011, 05:33 PM
 
Location: The Woods
17,094 posts, read 22,611,642 times
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Someday you might grow up and find out the vanity of fashion, etc., is rather foolish and empty.
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Old 09-03-2011, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,786 posts, read 11,271,488 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
So I live in a boring rural un-incorporated community. I've had my fair shair of heart aches living here. My parents moved here when I was six from Oxnard, a worker class community with a gang problem in Southern California. When I was 18, I moved away to attend CSU Northridge in the San Fernando Valley region of Los Angeles. Thinking that living in the city would change my life and bring me male role models and popularity, I found everything but that. So my heart ache had continued there. So I ended up going back home and continued life with my friends here. But I AM SO SICK OF HERE! There is no way I am moving back to Los Angeles, but I wouldn't mind moving to the nearby college 25 minutes away. The one thing I miss in larger communities is the open-ness to diversity. All though even though our largest town has 45,000 population it's very white. 85% white, 5% asian, and the rest is a mix of other races. But I feel more accepted in that ocmmunity. And it has more shops and dining places found in larger cities like Macy's, Olive Garden, Costco, Best Buy, Talbots, Pottery Barn, Gap, Barnes N Nobles, Sephora, Abercrombie and Fitch, Banana Republic, Apple, and others. It also has a very good bus system. A downtown with buildings up to 75 ft tall.

It's everything I can imagine. All though, I can imagine living in a larger community in a suburban development neighbors aren't as friendly in my town and there is more burgalry crimes and more traffic. But I feel it would be more worth it. Living in a college town, that has a beautiful coastal mountain range scenery and many outdoor activities. And meeting people from different career fields.

So does anyone else feel my way?
The fact that so many people leave rural ares after high school proves that most people feel this way. Those who remain are the ones who don't value education, who don't wish to experience other facets of life, and who don't have any ambition. But there are people like this in urban areas as well. They plan to die within a mile of the place of birth, to have jobs as good as, but no better than their parents, and to consider the place they live to be the best on earth without having any standard of comparison. I actually saw a post on a C-D forum in which an individual was lamenting the loss of the days when someone was "grandfathered" into a menial factory job which allowed him to work "on the line" for twenty-five years, and be a member of a union. That seems to be little different from the individual who believe everyone should remain in his small town working as a farm laborer or some other low-paying job.

People, if they're not mental defectives, need to be able to make rational and informed choices. The real key to this is to get the best education possible with a wide range of courses treating the history of our culture. Sadly, that's not eaasy in this day of technical specialization. But education is what determines an individual's economic class.

With education comes the opportunity to live in a variety of places and likely to see an even wider variety. When someone does this he can determine from his own degree of satisfaction which he prefers. He may prefer the big city, the grassy suburb, or to return his rural place of birth. It doesn't matter which he chooses as long as he is making an informed choice.
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Old 09-03-2011, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Petticoat Junction
930 posts, read 1,665,782 times
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No.
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Old 09-03-2011, 10:24 PM
 
Location: North Western NJ
6,591 posts, read 21,269,892 times
Reputation: 9608
Quote:
Those who remain are the ones who don't value education, who don't wish to experience other facets of life, and who don't have any ambition.
what about those that remain because they LOVE the life...
while im sure many people sty because ther afraid of the world beyond, many also stay because they realy do LOVE the rural life, the slower pace, the knowledge that your one physical hard work literally put that meal on the table ect...

i do agree that people need to make informed desicions of where they want to go with their own lives, and things like education and seeing other ways of life are important, but saying that those that stay rural only do so because they have no ambition or dont value other ways of life is very closed minded.
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Old 09-04-2011, 01:02 AM
 
Location: Southern California
3,115 posts, read 7,355,695 times
Reputation: 3672
Quote:
Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
Someday you might grow up and find out the vanity of fashion, etc., is rather foolish and empty.
Not necessarily. Fashion is big business! And it's an art form, which is the exact opposite of foolish and empty. Obviously, not everyone values fashion, but there's nothing wrong with the OP finding value in it.
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