U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-04-2011, 03:45 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN (North Minneapolis area)
2,032 posts, read 4,378,715 times
Reputation: 824

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
Someday you might grow up and find out the vanity of fashion, etc., is rather foolish and empty.
That's an asinine thing to say, Fashion is an art form, and if someone enjoys it, how is that foolish and empty? Same thing can be said about anything, hunting, fishing, or anything people in rural areas enjoy. Live your life and live and do what you enjoy. Some people enjoy small towns like my parents and grandparents, and people like me enjoy big cities. Nothing wrong with either. Do what you enjoy and makes you happy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-04-2011, 07:22 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,083 posts, read 34,596,801 times
Reputation: 16866
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
Those who remain are the ones who don't value education,
who don't wish to experience other facets of life,
and who don't have any ambition.
Coming from Cody, WY... which one are you?

What about the ones who live rurally that have their Doctorates, or Masters, and LIKE living in rural areas?
What about those who live in rural areas and have traveled the World and lived in different Countries and around the US, only to return to a rural area each time to decompress and slow down enough to enjoy what life has given them?
No ambition? LOL! Never set foot on a farm have you?

Either you are a disgruntled kid who can't wait to run away from Cody, or a hypocrite.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2011, 07:29 AM
 
25,885 posts, read 32,448,372 times
Reputation: 23109
Rural is not a measure of education or ambition. To imply that rural folks are not not educated or lack ambition you are sorely mistaken. It is beyong ignorant to make such a foolish statement. I can think of several people who have degrees and farm, ranch, or work is extremely rural settings.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2011, 07:31 AM
 
Location: North Western NJ
6,591 posts, read 21,276,873 times
Reputation: 9608
i wanted to comment on the fashion as empty thing.

i agree with the posters who said fashion itself can absolutly be a worthwhile thing...
but the op never mentioned beng into fashion design, just that they will only wear big brand designer names...nothing in the post mentioned thier life is incomplete without the museums, the arts, the culture of a larger city, but instead, macies, abercrombie and fitch, ect...nothing about wanting to go into fashion, just that they ONLY wear those things and they want to live in a place that has easy acess to those stores...

so in this case, yes, id say the op, from the info given is in it for the vanity of fashion,
not the love of the VERY worthy feild of fashion design.

the op is more concerend with how far away they are form macies than they are about how far away they are from any kind of real LIFE (be that rural or city, i dont find shopping to be living, its something you do because you need to...or if you enjoy it...but if thats the only reason you want to live in a bigger city...id be a little concerned about feeling complete anywhere if your biggest concern in life is acess to the mall...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2011, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,789 posts, read 11,276,228 times
Reputation: 19777
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
Coming from Cody, WY... which one are you?

What about the ones who live rurally that have their Doctorates, or Masters, and LIKE living in rural areas?
What about those who live in rural areas and have traveled the World and lived in different Countries and around the US, only to return to a rural area each time to decompress and slow down enough to enjoy what life has given them?
No ambition? LOL! Never set foot on a farm have you?

Either you are a disgruntled kid who can't wait to run away from Cody, or a hypocrite.
I lived as a boy in a Chicago suburb. My favorite part was the fact that we had large undeveloped park areas and a river. Living that close to Chicago I became very familiar with the big city. Now I have a country place between Cody and Yellowstone.

If I had been born here I would have either had to leave for an education as there is nothing but a junior college within commuting distance. Had I chosen to limit my education to that because I were afraid of the rest of the world, it's unlikely I would have been able to afford my property here. My parents didn't present me with a five million dollar farm or ranch on my eighteenth birthday. Farm labor is not high income employment. Your comments remind me of those I've heard from people who live in Chicago who are insulted that anyone would leave, even temporarily, for any reason whatsoever. I have been asked if I'd ever worked in a union shop in the same tone that you asked if I'd ever set foot on a farm. The questions were both challenges to my statement that a person needs to leave kith and kin for education. Some people, particularly blue collar workers whether urban or rural, seem to believe that no one should ever wish to move up the socioeconomic ladder.

I'm now one of those rural people who does have a doctorate (we don't capitalize the word in English). At this point in my life I don't need it in my business but it provided my original entry pass into the good life. I live in an area with a strong intellectual and cultural life that allows people to live in a wonderful country area. It's beautiful; it's an area of low crime, virtually none in my particular areas; it's a place where ethnic diversity means descendants from different European countries. I read French and German and can speak both in a limited way. But everyone I meet here speaks English.

I picked a state where the largest city is just a bit over fifty thousand. Wyoming certainly suffers from government intrusion but less so than any othe state I've examined. The people who share my views may be from here or from someplace else. But they all obtained an education that required them to leave home. The people that returned here and the people who migrated here did it with an informed choice. The people who never tried to learn, who stayed because of inertia, may vote in agreement with me but they do it merely because their peers do, not because of any understanding or knowledge. They wish desperately to fit into the group. Please note that Obama carried a lower percentage of Wyoming's vote than that of any other state.

Not all educated people who began their lives in urban areas are liberals trying to change an area. But when liberals do try to change an area, whom do you think may be able to stop them, the haves or the have-nots? Yokels, both urban and rural, have watched helplessly as liberals destroyed their homes. But there's another class of people that can do more than whine and complain
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2011, 06:29 PM
 
4,841 posts, read 11,036,425 times
Reputation: 1298
Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
YOU actually seem like a person who is too sheltered and too much in a shell, given that you seem to feel that happiness can only be found in suburban chain restaurants and retail. I wouldn't spend a lot of time knocking others for being "too sheltered" when it appears that you're seeking to embrace the very essence of a sheltered existence.
You are right. I'm not going to argue your point. I live in a sheltered rural community and now I want to be live in a sheltered urban community.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2011, 06:43 PM
 
4,841 posts, read 11,036,425 times
Reputation: 1298
Not only that, but my dad's side of the family and my mom's side are all in Southern California and live in city areas. I have an aunt in Mission Viejo, one in Palmdale, uncle in Newbury Park which is near Thousand Oaks, and another uncle in Los Angeles.

I miss having easy access to Olive Garden, Apple Bee's, Hometown Buffet, I-Hop, and Chipotle for eating out at nice sit down restauraunts. And I miss wearing clothing from quality stores like Gap, Macy's, and Banana Republic.

And I also miss having a home where I can look at see other suburban homes built on a hill.

And I miss walking around a downtown seeing different types of people and going to a favorite coffee shop.

And I dont like cities that have high crime rates and run-down downtowns. Oxnard was a place where their downtown had nothing but latino night clubs, mexican markets, and old stores and it wasnt safe to walk around at night.

I prefer cities like San Francisco, Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa, Ventura, Santa Monica, Costa Mesa, and other communities with low crime rates that many would consider "sheltered" cities.

The college town a half hour away from me has Macy's and the stores I like. A walkable urban downtown with a creek running through it and many coffee shops. It has all my favorite restauraunts. It has a bus transportation system. And it has urban homes in downtown and suburban neighborhoods on the egde of the city. And I commute there for college four days a week, and sometimes five times a week. And one day I do plan to move there, but in the mean time Im living at home saving my money so I dont go in debt. And I have zero debt right now as I community college is cheap and I work and I have middle class parents who saved up for my college expenses.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2011, 07:12 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 85,127,415 times
Reputation: 18083
Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
So I live in a boring rural un-incorporated community. I've had my fair shair of heart aches living here. My parents moved here when I was six from Oxnard, a worker class community with a gang problem in Southern California. When I was 18, I moved away to attend CSU Northridge in the San Fernando Valley region of Los Angeles. Thinking that living in the city would change my life and bring me male role models and popularity, I found everything but that. So my heart ache had continued there. So I ended up going back home and continued life with my friends here. But I AM SO SICK OF HERE! There is no way I am moving back to Los Angeles, but I wouldn't mind moving to the nearby college 25 minutes away. The one thing I miss in larger communities is the open-ness to diversity. All though even though our largest town has 45,000 population it's very white. 85% white, 5% asian, and the rest is a mix of other races. But I feel more accepted in that ocmmunity. And it has more shops and dining places found in larger cities like Macy's, Olive Garden, Costco, Best Buy, Talbots, Pottery Barn, Gap, Barnes N Nobles, Sephora, Abercrombie and Fitch, Banana Republic, Apple, and others. It also has a very good bus system. A downtown with buildings up to 75 ft tall.

It's everything I can imagine. All though, I can imagine living in a larger community in a suburban development neighbors aren't as friendly in my town and there is more burgalry crimes and more traffic. But I feel it would be more worth it. Living in a college town, that has a beautiful coastal mountain range scenery and many outdoor activities. And meeting people from different career fields.

So does anyone else feel my way?
I really don't see why you don't move then;its the only way your going to find out. Rememeber tho living in a palce is mcuh different from visiting.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2011, 07:32 PM
 
5,685 posts, read 8,706,022 times
Reputation: 7847
I've experenced it.

The activities are great, and the food is good.

Until you realize how much you are spending, the food is (Mostly) just chain food that you can do better with cooking at home, the place is FILTHY, crowded, and the people rude.

Till you realise... it's great.

Once you grow up/wake up/become aware... it's horrible!

The city (And I've lived in several) are a great place to visit, HORRIBLE places to live.

I always enjoy putting it behind me.


I don't care about clothing, but your assessment of 'used' is incorrect, and you can 'shop there' without living there.

I say make the move.

Ether your one of 'those' who will enjoy it, or you will grow out of it and be able to move on with yoru life and enjoy other things other than what someone decided to tell you to wear because it's "in" this year!

I went to an art Gallery on Friday, not really my thing, but the chick I was with enjoyed it, Same with Wine tastings etc... not really my thing, but it's broadening my horizons, and making me more well rounded. What you describe is the (my opinion) BS commercialism. "Cultural equivalent of a Big Mack"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:52 AM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top