U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-24-2011, 11:31 AM
 
2,878 posts, read 3,927,056 times
Reputation: 3083

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by montanamom View Post
I've explored the possiblities of what the OP is looking for and completely understand the yearning for that. But in reality, what it comes down to, to me is this:

Do you still need a job? Or are you retired or in some other way having a stream of income provided that will "come to you" wherever you are located? Do you have a viable work-at-home business established? What about health insurance? Or, are you already secure financially? Do you have cash saved to purchase a property such as you are seeking outright, or will you need to quality for a mortgage loan and make payments? Working for a bank, I know that mortgage and loan qualifications are tighter than ever.

The reason I'm asking is that there are a number of "catch-22's" I have run into in my own quest for similar rural peace and tranquility. The first is that many of the areas where rural homes and properties are affordable, such as SC, NC, TN, are NOT progressive areas overall. The so-called progressive areas tend to be the "transplant" or "retiree" areas, and therefore, not the most affordable. Also, in large part the affordability factor is due to the prevelance of low incomes and low job opportunities in those rural areas. These are also some of the hardest hit areas in this recession economically due to the loss of manufacturing jobs over the past decade or two. The old, "Mayberry" type towns are dying, unfortunately.
.
That being said, there are rural areas that are more progressive, in places such as Montana, where I lived for awhile, and Idaho. But you will not find rural properties very affordable there - that lifestyle is reserved for, again, those with already established income streams that are not dependant on close proximity to gainful employment.

The best solution may be, as someone else here mentioned, to try to purchase a "back to the land" property as a second home, while continuing to live modestly where you can realistically make a living until you don't need to work anymore. This is what I have decided to work towards. I also have children who are becoming young adults, and realistically, they are never going to make it in a rural and remote area, so that is another factor to think about if you have children.
Completely agree. Small comment: if (a big IF) a property and home are paid for (or property is paid for and money is in the bank to build a cheap, small home), in an appropriate climate with the appropriate knowledge and a good amount of luck, one need not have much income. The only things I can see spending money on are health insurance (a matter of choice), basics like flour, salt, sugar etc. (things one can't make/produce easily) and occasionally clothing, shoes, gas/diesel (if you don't do much driving you won't need much), animal food (if you purchased a larger acreage in an appropriate climate your horses/goats/chicken/cows won't need much supplementation) etc. So, expenses can be very low once the major purchase has been made (land+home).

OD
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-24-2011, 11:59 AM
 
Location: North Cackelacky....in the hills.
19,556 posts, read 19,546,660 times
Reputation: 2499
Our monthly payment is less than $300/month.
This on the land,the 'home' was pay as you go...

This means you don't need as much money.

What people need to be is realistic about a rural property.

And also realise the good times of easy money and good paying jobs are in the past.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-24-2011, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,151 posts, read 50,332,412 times
Reputation: 19856
Quote:
Originally Posted by montanamom View Post
...
The reason I'm asking is that there are a number of "catch-22's" I have run into in my own quest for similar rural peace and tranquility. The first is that many of the areas where rural homes and properties are affordable, such as SC, NC, TN, are NOT progressive areas overall. The so-called progressive areas tend to be the "transplant" or "retiree" areas, and therefore, not the most affordable. Also, in large part the affordability factor is due to the prevelance of low incomes and low job opportunities in those rural areas. These are also some of the hardest hit areas in this recession economically due to the loss of manufacturing jobs over the past decade or two. The old, "Mayberry" type towns are dying, unfortunately.
I can see that.

We choose an area that was not much effected by the recent recession. It's economy tanked many decades ago, and has never recovered.

A regional dressed economy forms 'affordability' [low incomes and few job opportunities in rural areas, with low taxes]. These are "Mayberry" type towns and they do feel to be dying,

If any employment opened up, the affordability would instantly vanish. You can not have both.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-25-2011, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Western North Carolina
5,044 posts, read 8,033,418 times
Reputation: 10831
Or, the affordablity factor drops if the rural area becomes a "go-to" place for wealthy people looking for a rural property. The job opportunities in the Bitteroot Valley in Montana were dismal, but that didn't stop the prices of land and homes from going through the roof. The area showed up in one of those money magazines for the well-heeled as a great place to put a hobby farm or purchase a nice "get-away".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-25-2011, 01:24 PM
 
2,878 posts, read 3,927,056 times
Reputation: 3083
Quote:
Originally Posted by montanamom View Post
Or, the affordablity factor drops if the rural area becomes a "go-to" place for wealthy people looking for a rural property. The job opportunities in the Bitteroot Valley in Montana were dismal, but that didn't stop the prices of land and homes from going through the roof. The area showed up in one of those money magazines for the well-heeled as a great place to put a hobby farm or purchase a nice "get-away".
Hey come on now, don't talk bad about the "job creators"!
OD
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-01-2011, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Northern Wisconsin
9,336 posts, read 8,062,385 times
Reputation: 16197
Small towns in Wisconsin or Minnesota should fit the bill. Plenty of liberals in Wisconsin. Pick a small town in the western part of the state, as most of the rural areas are shrinking. Should be able to find a house. Jobs? Can't help you there. Otherwise, Iowa City I fairly liberal, has a very low unemployment rate, and housing is afordable if you don't need the best. My son rents a farm house for $650 month.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2011, 03:37 AM
 
13,649 posts, read 26,079,477 times
Reputation: 21758
Regarding just doing the paperwork for same-sex couples to have the same rights (and responsibilities?) as straight couples, many rights and responsibilities are state-based, so coupling in one state is different than coupling in another.
Conversely, regarding anything federal, it doesn't matter if a state OK's gay marriages, the spouse still cannot get the other's pension payments or Social Security. Also, I believe that a same-sex spouse would have to adopt a child that the other spouse birthed or adopted in order to be a legal parent.
I live in Massachusetts. Many of my co-workers have married same-sex partners, and some have not done so. One guy said he didn't want to marry his boyfriend of 25 years "because it's so bourgeois."
They got married a year later.
My sister lived with her boyfriend for years. Then they got married, and after several years, he died. She get's his widow's pension from his job, and at age 60 (since she didn't remarry) she could apply for his Social Security. There is no way that I know of for that to happen without legal marriage.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2011, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,151 posts, read 50,332,412 times
Reputation: 19856
Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
Regarding just doing the paperwork for same-sex couples to have the same rights (and responsibilities?) as straight couples, many rights and responsibilities are state-based, so coupling in one state is different than coupling in another.
Conversely, regarding anything federal, it doesn't matter if a state OK's gay marriages, the spouse still cannot get the other's pension payments or Social Security. Also, I believe that a same-sex spouse would have to adopt a child that the other spouse birthed or adopted in order to be a legal parent.
I live in Massachusetts. Many of my co-workers have married same-sex partners, and some have not done so. One guy said he didn't want to marry his boyfriend of 25 years "because it's so bourgeois."
They got married a year later.
My sister lived with her boyfriend for years. Then they got married, and after several years, he died. She get's his widow's pension from his job, and at age 60 (since she didn't remarry) she could apply for his Social Security. There is no way that I know of for that to happen without legal marriage.
Way far off-topic
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2011, 08:09 AM
 
Location: North Cackelacky....in the hills.
19,556 posts, read 19,546,660 times
Reputation: 2499
I was a little confused what that had to do with getting back to the land in an affordable place...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2011, 12:09 AM
 
13,649 posts, read 26,079,477 times
Reputation: 21758
Sorry, it referenced a post several posters ago. Will be more careful.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:00 AM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top