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Old 09-11-2011, 10:31 PM
 
Location: Stephenville, Texas
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The Nebraska sandhills
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Old 09-12-2011, 12:51 PM
 
Location: North Cackelacky....in the hills.
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Western or South Australia...actually a lot of inland Australia except in the more southern states like New South Wales or Victoria.
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Old 09-13-2011, 01:33 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 46,363,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oz in SC View Post
Western or South Australia...actually a lot of inland Australia except in the more southern states like New South Wales or Victoria.
If we're talking Australia then yeah, Western Australia can be extremely isolated in parts. There are no towns or sealed between Eucla and Kunnunurra, a distance of over 2000 kilometres.
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Old 09-13-2011, 02:48 AM
 
1,337 posts, read 1,254,113 times
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Objectively? Alaska (if confining it to the United States of America, else most likely Antarctica is the Grand Prize winner)

Alaska has the lowest population density in the United States (1.3 people per square mile). But that Number 1 ranking spot alone doesn't do it sufficient justice because it's not just number one by a little bit, but it has a population density 438 percent less than the next lowest state, Wyoming (which holds the number 2 spot on the list at about 5.8 people per square mile). And again, one has to marvel at that when you really put it into context, because we're talking about Wyoming in the number 2 spot, which in itself has a shockingly low population density. For Alaska to be about 5 times lower than that is almost hard to fathom.

In contrast, New Jersey has the highest population density of approximately 1,196 people per square mile. List of U.S. states by population density - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://www.statemapsonline.com/image...lation-Map.gif




Obviously, you can't just look at it in terms of population density, since the figure doesn't really reflect how residents are distributed in the state, as its just an aggregate number, but as a general rule....the correlation is pretty high for the statistical outlier states (extreme low density, and extreme high density). Alaska, Wyoming, Montana, Dakotas, and countless other western states have vast tracts where there is barely a handful of residents over an area of tens of thousands of square miles (mainly because the BLM hoards land, and they control most of the western states).

I think pegging down a specific area which is -the- most remote would be a chore which would require a lot of research and fact checking. My guess would be either northern or western Alaska. You could probably find areas there on the order of 150,000 square miles where there are but a handful of bush residents, if even that.

Would not be surprised if Nevada topped that list, also, perhaps to peoples surprise. Largely because almost the entire state is controlled by the BLM (which doesn't mean people don't live in those areas.... just that I'm sure there one can find vast swaths of wasteland that top the list).


Possible map of interest: http://vote29.com/newmyblog/wp-conte...s_the_west.jpg

Last edited by FreedomThroughAnarchism; 09-13-2011 at 02:58 AM..
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Old 09-13-2011, 08:08 AM
 
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How about the Arizona strip? It's a huge chunk of land that starts at the northern edge of the Grand Canyon and borders Nevada and Utah. There are three small towns along the border with Utah and that's about it.
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Old 09-13-2011, 10:07 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
23,492 posts, read 41,085,731 times
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Parts of Canada, Alaska (great farming potential in some places)

Parts of NV, UT, CA, MT, SD make Bill, WY look like grand central station (Bill, WY is NOT impressive and I used to think it was on the edge of nowhere).
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Old 09-16-2011, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,490 posts, read 52,115,106 times
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Try the Tug Hill Plateau just north of Rome in upstate New York. Or the Badlands of North and South Dakota. Or anywhere in the Canadian Province of Labrador or Nunavik.
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Old 09-17-2011, 05:04 AM
 
25,880 posts, read 32,441,344 times
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The badlands of South Dakota is not isolated. Sparcely populated but there are roads through the badlands.

When I think isolated there are remote parts of SD, ND, Wyoming, Montana, Alaska that all come to mind.
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Old 09-17-2011, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,178 posts, read 9,537,698 times
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Here.

Everytime someone talks about the "Great Plains", they absolutely neglect Nebraska.

Which, BTW, is fine by me. Cows outnumber people 4 to 1, deer, antelope, and turkey are everywhere, the water is pure, the fishing is great, the prices are low, barter and trade are acceptable means of livelihood, and no one - not even the Federal Government knows where we are. Most of my neighbors live down gravel tracks that look like someone's driveway, and they go on for miles... DHS refuses to deliver out here, since according to them, we do not exist in their database in Washington DC.

Does this mean I don't have to pay taxes?? I mean, if I don't exist in Washington...
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Old 09-18-2011, 01:38 AM
 
25,880 posts, read 32,441,344 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCGranny View Post
Here.

Everytime someone talks about the "Great Plains", they absolutely neglect Nebraska.

Which, BTW, is fine by me. Cows outnumber people 4 to 1, deer, antelope, and turkey are everywhere, the water is pure, the fishing is great, the prices are low, barter and trade are acceptable means of livelihood, and no one - not even the Federal Government knows where we are. Most of my neighbors live down gravel tracks that look like someone's driveway, and they go on for miles... DHS refuses to deliver out here, since according to them, we do not exist in their database in Washington DC.

Does this mean I don't have to pay taxes?? I mean, if I don't exist in Washington...
I love that sort of living. And yes that is wishful thinking.
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