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Old 10-25-2011, 12:21 PM
 
Location: 112 Ocean Avenue
5,706 posts, read 8,232,437 times
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The poor population in America’s suburbs — long a symbol of a stable and prosperous American middle class — rose by more than half after 2000, forcing suburban communities across the country to re-evaluate their identities and how they serve their populations.

The increase in the suburbs was 53 percent, compared with 26 percent in cities. The recession accelerated the pace: two-thirds of the new suburban poor were added from 2007 to 2010.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/25/us...nities.html?hp

A reverse migration back into cities.
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Old 10-25-2011, 02:33 PM
 
373 posts, read 555,940 times
Reputation: 243
Default That is the new America

That is the new America. America on the ground pics and narratives.

More middle class jobs are now gone or far less stable.

Still it is somewhat genteel as there seem to be alot of food handouts and some social services.

It shows problems but not surprisingly the NYT does not show succuessful solutions.

Many people in what had been safer areas, now routinely ask for the latest news in homicides, drug houses, burglaries and home invasions for thier nieghborhood.

A relative went home from work for a couple of hours and flextimed it, whtn there was a home invasion around the corner from where they lived.
Sub human animals were knocking on doors to see if anyone was home, and if no answer planned to break in. Parked right in the driveway of one house, and left after they saw the frightened old women look through a window, then went around the corner and did break into another house while people were there. Police were knocking on doors next looking for wittnesses. So he goes home checks the doors and windows of his house and goes back to work. Calls the cops first and tells them they were knocking on his door, says he was at work and dispatcher says they don't need to speak with him.

It was a routine problem management and coworkers could relate too.

The people who were robbed did move soon afteward.

Alot of the poverty and ecomomic distress is made worse by the subhuman animals.

Still people make lives in the midst of the spreading blight and ruins of society. No one went onto thier property and tried to bother their home according to wittnesses.

The place looks like peckerwoods live there.

Last edited by 1957TabbyCat; 10-25-2011 at 03:12 PM..
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Old 10-28-2011, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
11,544 posts, read 26,376,274 times
Reputation: 6283
The sad news is 42% of America's workforce are under-employed or part time. Who do we blame?
NAFTA? Wall Street? Drugs? Parents? A poor education? Illegals? Corporate greed? Theses entities all contributed to the end result.

WE THE PEOPLE ALLOWED IT. Now WE THE PEOPLE need to repair it.

The best way is to be self-sufficient if you are able. Hunt, fish, grow a garden, raise a few laying hens. Share what you cannot use. What you save is not spent in a grocery store. Form a community group and buy in bulk. A penny saved is one penny a corporation does not get.

My two cents.
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Old 10-29-2011, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,789 posts, read 11,274,071 times
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Remember Ronald Reagan's dictum to vote with your feet? Well, the people who did it are doing just fine. We have unskilled jobs in Wyoming that let a person take home over a thousand per week with overtime. North Dakota has even more. Texas isn't bad at all.

But people don't want to leave their happy nests. Now that unemployment insurance has been turned into welfare they see no need. They love their food stamps and Medicaid.

There are plenty of jobs going begging. But there are plenty of people who would rather be beggars.

People get the neighborhoods they deserve. I'd like to see a batch of criminals try a home invasion here. That's why we don't have them.
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Old 10-29-2011, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
11,544 posts, read 26,376,274 times
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I think that is WONDERFUL news for Wyoming Wranglers. It would be, too, for the rest of the unemployed in America. However life is not that simple; it never is. . .
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Old 11-04-2011, 10:59 PM
 
2,878 posts, read 3,926,633 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
People get the neighborhoods they deserve. I'd like to see a batch of criminals try a home invasion here. That's why we don't have them.
You don't have the population density. If you did, you would be singing a different tune
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Old 11-05-2011, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,178 posts, read 9,538,452 times
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To me, this is the most telling paragraph -
"Federal vouchers to get poor people into private housing also contributed, Ms. Kneebone said. Cleveland was No. 15 among the country’s top 100 metropolitan areas for increase in suburban share of vouchers."

You can get people into houses, but that will not guarantee that they will become responsible homeowners or community members. When they have been raised all of their lives with an entitlement or landlord/renter attitude, they cannot understand that they have to acttually mow their yard, repair the heater, work sometimes two or three jobs to keep their family in the house that they were told they 'deserved' simply by existing.

The one thing I have noted throughout my life is that when you give something to most people that is "free" they come to expect it to continue to be free. They won't put out the extra effort to rise above or get ahead - why should they? They'll just get more free stuff.

When the free stuff runs out, they either revert to their animalistic and self-instantaneously-gratifying natures (part of the reason they never saved, planned, and bought a home to begin with) or leave to go blight another neighborhood and live off of it instead. Meanwhile, decent people, who have struggled to stay in their homes, keep jobs, and take care of themselves, are not only losing their jobs and their autonomy, but their suburbanite safety as the freeloaders decide that criminal behavior in those neighborhoods is not only acceptable but profitable.

It is only going to get worse.

Which is why I moved as far away from it as possible. The minute the US Senate decided to tell everyone that they 'deserved' a home without any effort on their part, I knew the scales had tipped, and the writing was on the wall.
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Old 11-05-2011, 03:02 PM
 
2,878 posts, read 3,926,633 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCGranny View Post
To me, this is the most telling paragraph -
"Federal vouchers to get poor people into private housing also contributed, Ms. Kneebone said. Cleveland was No. 15 among the country’s top 100 metropolitan areas for increase in suburban share of vouchers."

You can get people into houses, but that will not guarantee that they will become responsible homeowners or community members. When they have been raised all of their lives with an entitlement or landlord/renter attitude, they cannot understand that they have to acttually mow their yard, repair the heater, work sometimes two or three jobs to keep their family in the house that they were told they 'deserved' simply by existing.

The one thing I have noted throughout my life is that when you give something to most people that is "free" they come to expect it to continue to be free. They won't put out the extra effort to rise above or get ahead - why should they? They'll just get more free stuff.

When the free stuff runs out, they either revert to their animalistic and self-instantaneously-gratifying natures (part of the reason they never saved, planned, and bought a home to begin with) or leave to go blight another neighborhood and live off of it instead. Meanwhile, decent people, who have struggled to stay in their homes, keep jobs, and take care of themselves, are not only losing their jobs and their autonomy, but their suburbanite safety as the freeloaders decide that criminal behavior in those neighborhoods is not only acceptable but profitable.

It is only going to get worse.

Which is why I moved as far away from it as possible. The minute the US Senate decided to tell everyone that they 'deserved' a home without any effort on their part, I knew the scales had tipped, and the writing was on the wall.
Anyone who has studied the history and making of the Dust Bowl in the 30s knows that at that time the Great American Desert was renamed into the Great Plains (well actually it was a bit earlier than that). A few unscrupulous real estate barons and a government intent on putting people into the various Panhandles (Oklahoma, TX), places that could not support any life based on agriculture - they all acted in concert to eradicate the Indians and put poor, unsuspecting sodbusters into their homesteads, no-matter-what. Most of the cowboys that lived on the plains knew that agriculture was not possible there and then but with government's help manuals were printed to show people that indeed it was possible. The railway companies even claimed that the steam from their locomotives will stir up rain. The agricultural manual exclaimed that dust is a great mulch and that plowing up the prairie and destroying the only thing that held that soil together (the grasses) will actually stir up the skies and cause rain.

Anyways, my point is that the government always ran these schemes with various businesses and individuals. Additional point is that at that time the government was much smaller than today but that did not make any difference. Final point is that greed and ignorance have been a part of our history and will be again as evidenced by the real-estate crash of 2007+.

As a conclusion, in the 1900s a town was made in Oklahoma (I think it was Boise city). It was not a real town but thousands of lots around it were sold to people from all over with sketches and images of tree lines streets, water towers, the promise of 4 railways going through town etc. When the people finally showed to see their new homesteads they were greeted with the harsh reality - dust, no water and no town. The two realtors who sold this scheme went to jail but there were only a few people who did in those times and many, many more lots were sold to poor people who came there thinking they were buying a bargain (and who could not afford the rich and much more expensive soils of the southern plains). Fast forward to 2007+, the banks got bailed, the brokers got bailed and the rest of the poor sodbusters? Errr, middle class? who the hell cares...Nobody went to jail over this last crisis either...

My $.02
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