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Old 04-23-2012, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
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I probably like "full-size" horses about as much as anyone, but I've never had the slightest inkling of an idea that I might want to own a mini. I like horses because I like to ride, not because I like to feed, groom, trim, and otherwise care for them.

Another negative is that because we like to ride, buying a mini would mean buying two; if we just had one it would be left freaking out in the pasture every time we took off to ride the big horses so in the name of being responsible owners we'd have to furnish a companion for it all the time.

Don't take any of this the wrong way, I'm not "anti-mini" by any means. I've had friends who raise them and some of them are very pretty and very sweet, and as previously stated you can drive them provided the payload isn't too great. They're just not for me.
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Old 04-23-2012, 06:19 PM
 
Location: Lake Coeur D’Alene
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duster1979 View Post

Another negative is that because we like to ride, buying a mini would mean buying two; if we just had one it would be left freaking out in the pasture every time we took off to ride the big horses so in the name of being responsible owners we'd have to furnish a companion for it all the time.

.
Any horse, mini or otherwise should be fine being left when it's companion horse leaves. There's no need to buy two for that reason. Proper training takes care of it.
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Old 04-25-2012, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
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I agree.
Buddy sour horses are not only irritating but they can be dangerous to themselves and others. That is a behavior to nip in the bud!
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Old 04-25-2012, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mistyriverranch View Post
Any horse, mini or otherwise should be fine being left when it's companion horse leaves. There's no need to buy two for that reason. Proper training takes care of it.
Sorry, I wasn't talking about "herd bound" behavior; "freaking out" was probably a poor choice of words. And yes, a horse that gets anxious for its buddies when left alone can be conditioned to change it's behavior (which would be one more thing to deal with just to keep a "pet" that's too small to ride and to big to take along in the cab of the truck).

The fact is that horses are social animals. Two or more horses together in a pasture are generally content to roam around grazing the day away as long as they have plenty of food, water, and shelter.

But one horse left by itself for a period of time, particularly if it's used to being with other horses, will eventually get bored and find some way to get itself into trouble. It's just the nature of the species.
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Old 04-25-2012, 05:47 PM
 
2,878 posts, read 3,925,002 times
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Originally Posted by itsMeFred View Post
I agree.
Buddy sour horses are not only irritating but they can be dangerous to themselves and others. That is a behavior to nip in the bud!
For most of today's horse owners who have full time jobs training a horse to behave in any way is mostly fiction.

The proliferation of big name trainers like Parelli or Anderson is a sure indicator that folks are not using their horses anymore and spending 8 hrs a day on their backs.

Most horse problems come from lack of knowledge but more importantly lack of time.

In a typical situation where you work full time and your horse spends all his time with his buddy, you are at a disadvantage. You get to feed your horse every day, then you clean stalls and then maybe once or twice a week you slap the saddle on for a quick ride. Between kids, activities, other life events, work, taking care of the household etc., your horse's best buddy (or leader) is not you - it's his horse buddy whom he shares all his waking and sleeping hours with.

So, stating that "buddy sour" behavior should be nipped in the bud and trained away should properly be prefaced with "anyone who does not have time for a horse should not have one in the first place". Unfortunately, this would disqualify majority of this country. The popularity of horse trainers, tools, DVDs etc. is perfect proof of all of the above.

I have met a lot of horse folks in my life and most of them were incompetent and borderline crazy around their animals. Visit any boarding barn (why own a horse if you won't take care of it?) and you will seek out a lot of psychos.

If you are rich you can have someone handle and ride your horse daily but it will cost you (and there is the question of whether you trust someone to handle your horse the way you would). You can also be lucky enough to have the rare animal that is fine by themselves and needs to be ridden once a week to keep respectful and vice (or bad behavior under saddle) free.

Most horses like all other animals (including humans) are opportunistic and as such will exercise any freedom afforded to them. You give an inch, they take the inch. Then they try to take one more even if you didn't give it (again, you can run into the rare horse that will know its place no matter what but these animals are rare, cost a lot and folks rarely give up a good horse - plenty of bad ones for sale!).

There is no substitute for spending time with your horse. Yes, there are exercises and band-aids you can do to try and teach them not to be buddy-sour (riding away, coming back, riding away, coming back, work them into a sweat around their buddy and then rest them away from the buddy) but all this goes to hell the week you did not have time to ride them and they spent 7/24/168 with their buddy

My $.02
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Old 04-25-2012, 06:23 PM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
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What are they like to house train?
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Old 04-25-2012, 07:20 PM
 
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Originally Posted by cittic10 View Post
What are they like to house train?
I suppose people will do anything these days but a horse is a horse and I would not keep one in a house...

OD
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Old 04-25-2012, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Lake Coeur D’Alene
4,997 posts, read 6,804,010 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duster1979 View Post
Sorry, I wasn't talking about "herd bound" behavior; "freaking out" was probably a poor choice of words. And yes, a horse that gets anxious for its buddies when left alone can be conditioned to change it's behavior (which would be one more thing to deal with just to keep a "pet" that's too small to ride and to big to take along in the cab of the truck).

The fact is that horses are social animals. Two or more horses together in a pasture are generally content to roam around grazing the day away as long as they have plenty of food, water, and shelter.

But one horse left by itself for a period of time, particularly if it's used to being with other horses, will eventually get bored and find some way to get itself into trouble. It's just the nature of the species.
Not much conditioning. Just a good sturdy fence and nothing for the horse to get into trouble with. Most level headed horses will just trot or canter back and forth and call. If you have one of the more unusual ones who really, truly freak out if left alone, that's a different issue. But mini's just aren't that hard to handle and they don't tend to have the hotness of a thoroughbred or arab.
I wouldn't keep a horse alone indefinitely. But to not leave one alone for a few hours or a day without a companion is not necessary, unless the horse left alone has a real problem with it, like a really hot show horse.
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Old 04-25-2012, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Lake Coeur D’Alene
4,997 posts, read 6,804,010 times
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Originally Posted by ognend View Post



So, stating that "buddy sour" behavior should be nipped in the bud and trained away should properly be prefaced with "anyone who does not have time for a horse should not have one in the first place". Unfortunately, this would disqualify majority of this country. The popularity of horse trainers, tools, DVDs etc. is perfect proof of all of the above.

I have met a lot of horse folks in my life and most of them were incompetent and borderline crazy around their animals. Visit any boarding barn (why own a horse if you won't take care of it?) and you will seek out a lot of psychos.

If you are rich you can have someone handle and ride your horse daily but it will cost you (and there is the question of whether you trust someone to handle your horse the way you would). You can also be lucky enough to have the rare animal that is fine by themselves and needs to be ridden once a week to keep respectful and vice (or bad behavior under saddle) free.

Most horses like all other animals (including humans) are opportunistic and as such will exercise any freedom afforded to them. You give an inch, they take the inch. Then they try to take one more even if you didn't give it (again, you can run into the rare horse that will know its place no matter what but these animals are rare, cost a lot and folks rarely give up a good horse - plenty of bad ones for sale!).

There is no substitute for spending time with your horse. Yes, there are exercises and band-aids you can do to try and teach them not to be buddy-sour (riding away, coming back, riding away, coming back, work them into a sweat around their buddy and then rest them away from the buddy) but all this goes to hell the week you did not have time to ride them and they spent 7/24/168 with their buddy

My $.02
So then what do you do when you try to ride your horse away from his buddy and he fights you tooth and nail? A barn sour or herd bound horse can take all the pleasure out your allotted time to ride and be dangerous to boot. Sorry...I agree with ItsMeFred. If you don't have time to break a horse of this particular trait, I don't need to say you shouldn't have a horse...you probably won't ride him much anyway.

And as far as boarding stables..most folks I know who board, do so because they don't live in a place where they can keep their horses at home.
Also, if a person doesn't have the resources to fix a problem like this themselves, there is nothing wrong (and everything right) with finding a capable trainer to help them. Being barn sour or herd bound is a major vice and should be treated as such. It doesn't mean you're rich..it means you have common sense.

Though I will agree with you that you find a lot of nutty people in boarding stables. I've boarded in places all over the country and seen a lot of bad behavior.
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Old 04-25-2012, 10:33 PM
 
2,878 posts, read 3,925,002 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mistyriverranch View Post
So then what do you do when you try to ride your horse away from his buddy and he fights you tooth and nail? A barn sour or herd bound horse can take all the pleasure out your allotted time to ride and be dangerous to boot. Sorry...I agree with ItsMeFred. If you don't have time to break a horse of this particular trait, I don't need to say you shouldn't have a horse...you probably won't ride him much anyway.

And as far as boarding stables..most folks I know who board, do so because they don't live in a place where they can keep their horses at home.
Also, if a person doesn't have the resources to fix a problem like this themselves, there is nothing wrong (and everything right) with finding a capable trainer to help them. Being barn sour or herd bound is a major vice and should be treated as such. It doesn't mean you're rich..it means you have common sense.

Though I will agree with you that you find a lot of nutty people in boarding stables. I've boarded in places all over the country and seen a lot of bad behavior.
That was kind of my point - most people don't have time to own a horse, let alone break them off tricky habits. In my experience, being buddy sour is the hardest habit to break since it really requires consistent handling for a long time and you are in a bad spot because once you are done working with your horse you put them back with his buddies anyways for the huge majority of the day. In other words, it won't help if you spend an hour trying to teach the horse to be away from his buddies and then put them back with his buddies for the next week or two.

I agree that a buddy sour horse can be dangerous.

My point was that a lot of people should not own a horse. It is a relic from a different time when horses were "using" animals. Today they are a business (shows, competitions) or pets or for the very small majority who are either retired or rich, horses are an everyday hobby (these folks stand a chance of having a good horse). Unlike a 150 years ago when a horse was your basic mode of transportation and had to work for a living (and people did not have time to play games nor did the horse have the time to become buddy-sour) most horses today have problems that stem from a) lack of time on owner part, b) being stabled non-stop and c) too much food and not enough work. In these situations it is not a miracle that a horse would be buddy or barn bound or refuse a saddle in all sorts of ways.

Seeking out help of a trainer (how do you find a competent one? - many of them are incompetent crooks) is fine but does not solve the basic problem of an owner not having time for a horse. The trainer may very well break the horse off this habit by (guess what) spending time with the horse. Once the horse is back with the owner, it very quickly falls back into the old pattern of behavior 'cause (guess what?) horses are creatures of habit and so are their owners

OD
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