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Old 01-24-2012, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Kalamazoo
80 posts, read 174,177 times
Reputation: 103

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdna View Post
I'm vegan and not religious and I live in a wonderful, very small mountain town in Idaho. People here put a lot of thought into healthy food and living. I don't remember the last time I saw an obese local. My brother and I made a rare trip to the city a few weeks ago and the thing that stood out the most to both of us, other than the light pollution, was the tremendous number of overweight people, especially kids. Kids here are outside year round. There are enough vegetarians and vegans that the pub has a separate cook station to avoid contamination. No one looks down on you for eating healthy, they want to swap recipes. People here might think you were a freak for being so closed minded and judgmental, since that is so unusual for them, but healthy living is just normal.

Edited to add: The fact is, even if we did think your views were a bit odd, you'd still be invited and welcomed to join gatherings and events, because that's what this community is about.
Where do you live? I love Idaho, and your town sounds awesome!
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Old 01-24-2012, 07:27 PM
 
2,570 posts, read 2,609,974 times
Reputation: 4410
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marce30 View Post
Im not religious and im vegan, do you think i would survive in a small town ? the answer is no.
I have two employees that are vegan and non-religious. One lives in a town of 17,000 the other in a nearby town of 250. They do fine.
But, I don't think you would. Yet.
I hate all type of animal cruelty and a lot of people in small towns love to hunt (which i think its a horrible thing to do), they eat whatever, dont really care about being healthy. Here's a news flash: Many of the people I meet who come here to hunt are from west coast urban areas. And we have little obesity in my county.
Just imagine if i go to a restaurant to have dinner, what would i order from the menu ? i'd have to survive eating salad for the rest of my life. When we all go out to eat, the vegans who work for me manage to create a full meal out of the available options. Now when serve-staff see them they even make suggestions. In the city you have thousands of options, you cant even compare.
My neighbor (23 years old) told me that she moved here (Los Angeles) because West Virginia was too conservative and she hated the fact that if you dont go to church every sunday they would gossip about you the whole week. Though you can repeat gossip about W. VA? It's human nature, honey. We're all just trying to figure us humans out.
Hang in there. People with a world view other than your own aren't all bad.
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Old 01-26-2012, 12:53 PM
 
Location: On the west side of the Tetons
1,355 posts, read 2,118,172 times
Reputation: 2622
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissLariss View Post
Where do you live? I love Idaho, and your town sounds awesome!
Victor. All of Teton Valley is wonderful.
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Old 01-26-2012, 04:49 PM
 
Location: In a chartreuse microbus
3,857 posts, read 5,384,646 times
Reputation: 8037
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs. Skeffington View Post

She's altered some of my tried and true Pennsylvania Dutch recipes so that they are vegan, and healthier - a difficult task.
Mmmmmmm-mmm! Some of the best stuff on the planet, but then, I'm a little Dutch.

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Old 01-27-2012, 02:27 AM
 
6,501 posts, read 5,590,222 times
Reputation: 9038
Quote:
Originally Posted by sirron View Post
Mmmmmmm-mmm! Some of the best stuff on the planet, but then, I'm a little Dutch.

Pennsylvanie Dutch ess soch iss gude essen! We made "vegan" Dutch potato filling for Christmas, using soy milk and Better Than Eggs. It was really good, I couldn't tell the difference (and I've been eating potato filling for over 50 years). Figuring out how to adapt schnitz und gnepp is a little tough, though.
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Old 01-27-2012, 05:05 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,178 posts, read 9,537,698 times
Reputation: 9580
One important thing that needs to be mentioned - don't take yourself too seriously.


We bought 60 acres in the middle of ranches and cornfields spanning thousands of acres. We brought in Dexters - also called "mini-cows" by the locals, even though they are full-sized, not bred down, for their breed. We also brought in a small, gentle 13-hands pinto, whom we adopted from a riding stable that went out of business; while everyone else is competing for and with the 16-hand horses. Our neighbors started calling us "The Petting Zoo"! We laughed and went with it.


A big thing here is being able to spin a good yarn. So we tell tales about ourselves, our 'little' bull, our 'little' cows. We joke with our neighbors about the "pressures" of calving (we started with two cows and a bull, not hundreds of cows and a half-dozen bulls). We can get everyone laughing about what goes on, out on our "Petting Zoo". Over Christmas, several neighbors brought their friends and relatives over to pet our cows and chat about the 'little ones' - the smaller children are not afraid of our smaller, gentler, tamer animals, and we help them get over their fear of 'those great big cows' Uncle Rick or Aunt Mary have. This past summer a 'townie' girl, who had never had any experience with cattle, came over and started helping with the calves because she joined the local 4-H. In August she won her first blue ribbon with our Dexter steer!


Folks out here have huge "brandings", that last all day, sometimes all weekend, where the new calves are herded into chutes, tossed and branded just like you see on TV - but with huge potluck meals and gatherings. When asked when we were going to throw our "branding", we just laugh and say, "We'll post the invitation - but it'll be more like a brunch!"


We don't demand that people accept us or our way of life; we do what we do because we love it and think it is fun. We respect them and make jokes about ourselves - and have fitted right in to the community. We ask peoples' advice on things we don't know, and don't try to pretend that we know everything. A little weird, a little strange, but always willing to help others or share a laugh at our own expense. It costs us nothing, and benefits us well!
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Old 01-27-2012, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Rivendell
1,387 posts, read 2,189,177 times
Reputation: 1650
Quote:
Originally Posted by 601halfdozen0theother View Post
Well, though, Mace made a somewhat valid point untintentionally.

The two main community builders in very small towns are the schools and the churches (or, the only church in town.) Many very small towns don't have organizations such as Masons, Kiwanis, etc.

Someone without religious beliefs who doesn't attend any church or have kids in school really could be excluded from the majority of small-town community life. Especially if the wider community is very religious, which often is the case.

Fortunately, though, there are other means of feeling comfortable in a small town. These include developing friendly relationships with the neighbors, getting to know the man or woman who runs the post office, buying groceries and hardware at the local grocery/hardware store (if there is one), stopping to talk with people in their yards while walking the dog, being friendly to the kids who ride their bikes/4-wheelers/snowmobiles by your house, serving as an election judge, and volunteering with community special events.

Actually, between work and my own life stuff and doing the above, I'm busy enough that the friendliness or lack thereof of a small town just has never been an issue for me - and I'm not a church goer.

But I can see that people who need more social interaction but who aren't religious and don't attend church would be unhappy in many small towns.
I agree with all of this. I am not religious, don't have kids, but in less than three years I have been more than welcomed in to a tiny community by doing the very things you suggest.
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Old 01-28-2012, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Mayacama Mtns in CA
14,523 posts, read 7,678,834 times
Reputation: 11317
Quote:
Originally Posted by SCGranny View Post
One important thing that needs to be mentioned - don't take yourself too seriously.
. . .
A little weird, a little strange, but always willing to help others or share a laugh at our own expense. It costs us nothing, and benefits us well!
What a good point you've made and you know, you folks sound like you'd be great neighbors.
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Old 01-28-2012, 01:15 PM
 
Location: New Brunswick, NJ
1 posts, read 1,319 times
Reputation: 10
I would love to live in a "population 100" town, but with the economy down the hole, I'm afraid I wouldn't be able to find a job (I want to be a private investigator). I'm still in college and will be for quite some time; I'm really hoping that the economy will start to make a turn-around by the time I graduate.
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Old 01-29-2012, 12:10 AM
 
2,542 posts, read 6,065,969 times
Reputation: 2602
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marce30 View Post
Im not religious and im vegan, do you think i would survive in a small town ? the answer is no. I hate all type of animal cruelty and a lot of people in small towns love to hunt (which i think its a horrible thing to do), they eat whatever, dont really care about being healthy. Just imagine if i go to a restaurant to have dinner, what would i order from the menu ? i'd have to survive eating salad for the rest of my life. In the city you have thousands of options, you cant even compare.
My neighbor (23 years old) told me that she moved here (Los Angeles) because West Virginia was too conservative and she hated the fact that if you dont go to church every sunday they would gossip about you the whole week.
You have already been beat up, but just wanted to add that not only am I a vegetarian--my whole family is, husband and two young boys. I currently live in a 500-person ranching town in the middle of absolutely nowhere. We are also not religious.

We have been accepted by everyone in this town and no one has EVER said ANYTHING about our lifestyle, much less fuss over it. There is only one restaurant in town, so there isn't too much eating out anyhow. But the chef has made it clear that he will make us something special and delicious whenever we ask. People grow their own vegetables and even though I understand your repulsion to killing an animal, at least here people are taking care of their meat before they eat it--they aren't mindlessly buying factory-farmed meat from the grocery store. They see the animal from birth through death and all the joys and heartaches between.

And, we live in a highly conservative town and we are very liberal...

Back to the original post, I thought it was great and avoided all the cliche items usually in a list like this. I wonder at people who say a small town is boring--we have way too much to do! With so few people, you are most likely roped into helping with an event. If not, then you feel obligated to attend because they need all the people they can get (or else events stop happening). We have a community celebration for the kids for Easter and Halloween; this year there were three Christmas programs (!), Veterans' Day program, bazaars, birthday parties, girls' nights out, PTA, Boyscouts, 4-H, library programs---the list is dizzying. I had to start saying no (although its hard!), because I was already heading up three things and newly homeschooling.
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