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Old 03-04-2012, 06:50 PM
 
29,988 posts, read 37,775,668 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Driller1 View Post
In Michigan the county health department will see the system is right.

I hope the OP talks to their local health department first.

Covering the business end is a great idea!!!
Was not attempting to step on your toes in anything having to do with the actually drilling. You are the expert here in that arena.

Part of my point was that to request the Seller do this is something for which the Seller may not have the funds at this time (or likely it would have already been resolved). To request it be done prior to closing may not be financially possible for the Seller and may nix the deal.
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Old 03-05-2012, 12:06 AM
 
24,841 posts, read 32,889,763 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lifelongMOgal View Post
Was not attempting to step on your toes in anything having to do with the actually drilling. You are the expert here in that arena.

Part of my point was that to request the Seller do this is something for which the Seller may not have the funds at this time (or likely it would have already been resolved). To request it be done prior to closing may not be financially possible for the Seller and may nix the deal.
OMG!!!!! I did not realize how much I overstated things.......

Your idea was great on the business end........sorry.....
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Old 03-05-2012, 10:26 AM
 
3,102 posts, read 2,942,717 times
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The owners are out of state and have never lived in the house (they were just investors), in fact no one has ever lived in the house.

The owners are paying for a new well (to our specs) prior to closing which is great. But we have come up against another expensive hurdle.

The detached guest house has water damage (which we knew about) but it also has a lot of mold which will cost more than a new well to remove.
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Old 03-05-2012, 10:31 AM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,853 posts, read 30,803,493 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado^ View Post
We're looking at a home with 3.5 baths (two jacuzzi tubs) in the main house and single bath for the guest house. Wife and I are at home all day, most days as are our two kids and we periodical have a guest or four for a month at a time. If we buy the house we intend to install an outdoor hot tub.

Our current usage is 4300gal per/month but this does not include drinking water or guest usage. I'd imagine we would use more in the new house as we would want to enjoy those tubs, not to mention that we currently pay pay $300+ a month for water.

Sellers are saying they get 1 gal/min + cistern from the existing 400ft well. Supposedly a new well drilled at 800ft could produce 3gal/min at a cost of $16K.

I do not know the recovery rate on the well (well inspection is next week), but even if the well produced 1gal/min for the duration of the well test, that seems kind of low if it decreased during dryer months etc. We also have to think about resale value and 1 gal/min seems out of place for a house this size.

BTW the main house has never been lived in - the well was originally drilled for the guest house that was used as a small summer cabin.

The house is on 5 acres but there is no water rights for any irrigation or horses etc - which is fine by us.
It would not be acceptable for me. But then neither would living on 5 acres and being unable to grow a garden.

You might have to have supplemental water brought in during the dry months.

My personal opinion is that you are ill-advised to purchase this house.

20yrsinBranson
whose well produces 52 gpm
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Old 03-05-2012, 12:00 PM
 
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The house is at 10,000ft - very short grow season anyway. Plus I have zero interest in gardening. Mother nature does it best!

I asked a local driller about drought and he said that an 800ft well will be buffered from year to year variations in precipitation, so that is not a big concern. Most wells in the area are producing 3 to 5 GPM.

We are currently on a community well and pay $280 a month for water. There is no outside use of water here either - can't even wash your car.

20yrsinBranson, I do appreciate your advice not to buy this house, but imho the house is a great buy for many other reasons.
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Old 03-07-2012, 01:30 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,853 posts, read 30,803,493 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado^ View Post
The house is at 10,000ft - very short grow season anyway. Plus I have zero interest in gardening. Mother nature does it best!

I asked a local driller about drought and he said that an 800ft well will be buffered from year to year variations in precipitation, so that is not a big concern. Most wells in the area are producing 3 to 5 GPM.

We are currently on a community well and pay $280 a month for water. There is no outside use of water here either - can't even wash your car.

20yrsinBranson, I do appreciate your advice not to buy this house, but imho the house is a great buy for many other reasons.
10,000 feet? Have you spent time at this altitude for extended periods of time? I STRONGLY suggest you spend a couple of weeks there before you make the commitment to move there. We lived in Durango at 6,500 feet and I *NEVER* lot used to the altitude. I suffered terribly. I cannot even begin to imagine what 10,000 would be like.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 03-07-2012, 05:55 PM
 
3,102 posts, read 2,942,717 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
10,000 feet? Have you spent time at this altitude for extended periods of time? I STRONGLY suggest you spend a couple of weeks there before you make the commitment to move there. We lived in Durango at 6,500 feet and I *NEVER* lot used to the altitude. I suffered terribly. I cannot even begin to imagine what 10,000 would be like.

20yrsinBranson
We live at 9,500ft at the moment and spend most summers hiking/mountain biking/camping/rving in the mountains at higher altitude.

What do you mean by 'suffered terribly' due to the altitude? Sorry that Durango didn't work out for you but it sounds like you like where to live at the moment.
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Old 03-07-2012, 07:58 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,853 posts, read 30,803,493 times
Reputation: 22404
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado^ View Post
We live at 9,500ft at the moment and spend most summers hiking/mountain biking/camping/rving in the mountains at higher altitude.

What do you mean by 'suffered terribly' due to the altitude? Sorry that Durango didn't work out for you but it sounds like you like where to live at the moment.
Oh, I had no energy, couldn't do anything. I was always out of breath. My legs hurt constantly because I wasn't getting enough oxygen to my muscles. I also experienced a low-grade anemia because my nose bled CONSTANTLY due to the extremely dry air (despite having humidifiers going all the time). It was just a bad experience. Since you are already living at a high altitude, apparently you have acclimated.

It sounds like you have found your Nirvana. Go for it.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 03-08-2012, 10:13 AM
 
3,102 posts, read 2,942,717 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
Oh, I had no energy, couldn't do anything. I was always out of breath. My legs hurt constantly because I wasn't getting enough oxygen to my muscles. I also experienced a low-grade anemia because my nose bled CONSTANTLY due to the extremely dry air (despite having humidifiers going all the time). It was just a bad experience.
Wow, that doesn't sound like much fun. No amount of pretty snow capped mountains can make up for poor health!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Larkin251 View Post
We had the well inspected yesterday and at this time of year the well was only producing 1/3 GPM
Thanks for posting... makes me feel a little better!

Where abouts is your well?
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Old 03-08-2012, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Lewes, Delaware
3,483 posts, read 3,208,938 times
Reputation: 1904
Quote:
Originally Posted by Driller1 View Post
Some places the water just isn't there.

In my area many wells produces over 100 GPM.

That being said.....rarely does any one put a pump in that size.

10 t0 15 GPM is common.

I think that is a good reference point, most of the wells in my area produced similar, I'd be a little worried going under 5 gpm.
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