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Old 03-08-2012, 01:54 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larkin251 View Post
We had the well inspected yesterday and at this time of year the well was only producing 1/3 GPM
That is not near enough water.......
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Old 03-16-2012, 09:22 PM
 
Location: Approximately 50 miles from Missoula MT/38 yrs full time after 4 yrs part time
2,309 posts, read 3,414,492 times
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I've had 4 homes in various parts of the US, each with a well, two in the Rocky Mountains (CO & MT).........Here's what I've learned & my opinion on your situation.

1/ You want a minimum of 10 GPM from a well that has a "static water level" at least 14 feet above the level at which the pump is set during full draw-down.

2/... 6 inch diameter casing.

3/ ..a 3/4 H.P. pump with Stainless Steel Impeller, with the pressure switch set at:.. pump cut in at 30 psi and cut out at 60 psi.

4/ .. at least a 60 gal Pressure tank (preferrably an 80 gal) for a water system without a 1000 gallon (at a minimum) storage tank.

5/ ... if you are down around 4 to 6 gpm IMO it would be mandatory to have at least a 1000 to 1500 gallon storage tank and then pump from there into your pressue tank to service your water needs.

My present system in a mountain valley in western Montana is:

....a 6" casing driven down to 90 feet;..with a 3/4 H.P. Gould Pump with S.S. impeller and related components set at 80 feet......AND the first 60 inches of the casing is perforated....not the typical 30 to 36 inches.

....static level of water in the casing when no draw-down is occuring, is 19 feet.

....static level of water in the casing under "full-draw-down" (at 44 GPM) is 60 feet. I can run (7) Rain Bird Sprinkler Heads at approx 58 psi without the pump cycling. (NOTE: The less a pump cycles when water is being used.....the longer the pump will last). My system has been in use since the spring of 1980 and is still going strong with no service so far.

....I have (2) Filament Wound Fiberglass Pressure Tanks manifolded together,
with the pressure switch set to: cut the pump in at (39) psi and cut-out at (64) psi. Thus the bathroom furthest from the pressure tank(s) (approx 60 feet) has plenty of pressure at the shower head.

From the info you have supplied in your post(s) so far..................I would be VERY leary of purchasing this home..........a new well non-withstanding.

And considering the winter time temperatures at 10,000 feet in the mountains of Colorado........I would very carefully inspect ALL the plumbing and ALL water lines in the main house for ANY sign of the pipes ever having been frozen.......particularly since the house has never been occupied!!!!

No matter what you choose to do.........get all committments IN WRITING with various clauses in the written documents to fully protect you in the event your concerns are not satisfied and promises to you do not materialize.................
I certainly hope you are >>>utilizing the services of an attorney<<< in addition to a R.E. Broker for the potential purchase of this home.........Being in my 80th year, I have learned to protect myself in all financial dealings.

The mold (and the removal of it in that summer house) could be a very serious and expensive proposition.

If the original well and water system was so poorly done...................I would wonder how well the Septic System was engineered and installed. Again considering it really has never been utilized since the house has not been occupied.

Last edited by Montana Griz; 03-16-2012 at 10:13 PM.. Reason: fixed a couple of typos.............
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Old 03-16-2012, 09:40 PM
 
Location: Approximately 50 miles from Missoula MT/38 yrs full time after 4 yrs part time
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado^ View Post

Good new is that the sellers are willing to drill a new well,...........................
Rest assured, they will spend as little as possible when having this new well drilled and supplying all the necessary related equipment.

Areas where they will possibly"cut corners" may be:

1/...the size (H.P.) and Quailty and Brand of the pump.

2/... the type, Brand Name and Qualitry of the Pressure Tank.

3/ ...the reputation of the Well Driller.

Also, insist upon a "certified Copy of the Well Drilling Log" .

AND, a Copy of the Test Results of the water being produced by this new well.

See my post of 8:22 pm this date for more opinions and info.,......................
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Old 03-17-2012, 07:15 PM
 
3,102 posts, read 2,941,009 times
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Thanks Montana Griz for that very detailed post. The sellers are starting on the well next week, so this will give me something to work with.

Don't think we can realistically expect more than 5 gpm. I'll be real happy with 3 and we may have to settle for 1. I've done the calculations and I think 1 gpm is passable with a large cistern. It probably negatively affects re-sale value though.

Quote:
The mold (and the removal of it in that summer house) could be a very serious and expensive proposition.

If the original well and water system was so poorly done...................I would wonder how well the Septic System was engineered and installed. Again considering it really has never been utilized since the house has not been occupied.
We had one quote on the mold and it was around $25K to remove and then another $25K to rebuild the interior. The sellers are able to claim it on their insurance which is a win for everyone.

The main house was winterized and there are no signs of any mold or water damage.

There are two separate septic systems for the two dwellings, which we'll inspect once we have water. One is new, or at least unused. Who knows with the other one...

I have to comment that you must be doing pretty well for someone who's 80. Most that age are not very good with computers. From your post I gather you have a better memory than myself at 1/2 your age! Once again very appreciative of your post.
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Old 03-18-2012, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Approximately 50 miles from Missoula MT/38 yrs full time after 4 yrs part time
2,309 posts, read 3,414,492 times
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.....Colorado^........................

One additional bit of info you may want to explore.....it could be quite benefical for you.......depending on the specific circumstances related to your location, etc,etc.

go to the following web site:

About Hydrofracturing | The Well Improvement Company
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Old 03-18-2012, 10:21 PM
 
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Thanks for the suggestion. I asked our well inspector about hydrofracting and he said it doesn't work in the type of substrate we have in our neighborhood. If i remember correctly, he said you need rock and we have sandstone.
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Old 03-18-2012, 11:28 PM
 
24,841 posts, read 32,882,093 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Griz View Post
.....Colorado^........................

One additional bit of info you may want to explore.....it could be quite benefical for you.......depending on the specific circumstances related to your location, etc,etc.

go to the following web site:

About Hydrofracturing | The Well Improvement Company
That is for oil and gas wells.

Water wells are not nearly down as far as fracking procedures will work.

And if you went that deep it would be non potable water.
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Old 03-19-2012, 12:05 AM
 
Location: Approximately 50 miles from Missoula MT/38 yrs full time after 4 yrs part time
2,309 posts, read 3,414,492 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Driller1 View Post
That is for oil and gas wells.____________________________________________ __________________________________________________ ______________-
.....Any one who can read...knows that this procedure is used in the "Oil & Gas" field........AND is a proven technique for domestic residential water wells.

Perhaps if you would read the referenced "link" in my post, you just might further your knowledge in the field of 'Water well drilling".............your supposed experience in this field notwithstanding!!.

Personal documented experience:
I sold a home in the Colorado Rockies at 7050 feet that had a private residential well (in bed rock Granite, that was cased for 389 feet and the bore hole went another 92 feet beyond the casing.)
For several years this well produced 29 gpm at the well head at 50 psi........then (2 years after I sold the properrty) the production rate fell off by approx 60 %.

I suggested to the new owner that he have it hydrofracted...........he did and after this was done the well was then logged in at 35 gpm at 50 psi..................SO, don't tell me that it doesn't work!!!

.....Do your home work before you make statements that can easily be disproved........have a good day-------Griz.
__________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ ____

Water wells are not nearly down as far as fracking procedures will work.

And if you went that deep it would be non potable water.
..
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Old 03-19-2012, 01:21 AM
 
24,841 posts, read 32,882,093 times
Reputation: 11471
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Griz View Post
..
Oh, my water well is 320 foot in the rock.

To frack you would need to be 1300 foot or deeper to have any real production increase.

BTW, I did read your link.......fortunately in my area we as far from having to follow the "Pied Piper".
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Old 03-19-2012, 11:20 AM
 
24,841 posts, read 32,882,093 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado^ View Post
Thanks for the suggestion. I asked our well inspector about hydrofracting and he said it doesn't work in the type of substrate we have in our neighborhood. If i remember correctly, he said you need rock and we have sandstone.
Even if it was an option it would not be cost effective.

It costs over a million dollars to frack an oil well.

Of course, fracting a water well is different, still costly.

http://www.agwt.org/info/pdfs/hydrofrackingwells.pdf (broken link)

Last edited by Driller1; 03-19-2012 at 12:42 PM..
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