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Old 03-28-2012, 01:11 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,778 posts, read 6,688,814 times
Reputation: 8303

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Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
Maybe I'm hypersensitive to language (I know I am) but the heading of this thread, "Smalltown USA," sounds snarky to me, seems to presume certain stereotypes about any small town in the US, and certainly they vary as much as any other kind of area, city, suburb, countryside, and so on.
Maybe you're right. Personally, I didn't get that impression. And you're certainly right that stereotypes about small towns abound, and there are as many ignorant/stupid/whatever people in big cities - I think the difference is that in big cities because you have more people, you have more of a choice who to hang around with. In small towns you often don't.

Maybe this is a subject for a different thread, but around here small towns often have a kind of rivalry going between them and people say nasty things about other towns, the ones they don't live in. Is that also common in the rural US?
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Old 03-28-2012, 05:28 AM
 
13,629 posts, read 26,060,340 times
Reputation: 21721
Don't know where "around here" would refer to, but if nearby areas develop (or not) in different ways, and different residents are affected differently, or some old family used to own X but sold it, or a political change affected the quality of living in one place and not the nearby one, I guess anything is possible.
Could be an old class thing- like one town was where the miners lived and the next area was where the owners and other big money people lived. You know, "Other side of the tracks."
I don't think a blanket statement works too well.
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Old 03-28-2012, 09:36 AM
 
25,691 posts, read 24,526,757 times
Reputation: 44286
Quote:
Originally Posted by swanstone1 View Post
I know things I say might immediately seem offensive to anyone who lives in a small town and that is not at ALL my intention and maybe I just don't know how to ask otherwise.

I moved from a southern city of roughly 3 1/2 mill people and it is now 51/2 mill. .....

.....Still, after 15 years, I find myself in a roundabout of emotions......
.... Ahhh the definition of conundrum................
Well, it is kind of a wierd thing. I mean if you're so used to one way of life because its all you've ever known, it may be very hard, if not impossible, to adapt to another. Some can pull it off, some can't. But regardless, moving from the burbs to city, or from a city to small town, or country to a Manhattan type of life will take changes, very few will accept a new lifestyle brought to their home 'turf'. Tourists its one thing, but relocating and trying to maintain what you're used to or think everyone else is going to bend their already set lifestyle, in their own towns (or cities), may be a bit less acceptable.
Though many push the fact that all the 'real' jobs are out in the city, I personally have lived in cities and still had to commute 10, 20 or even 30 miles one way every day to get there.
You gotta do what YOU feel most comfortable with. Just sayin'.
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Old 03-28-2012, 05:44 PM
 
128 posts, read 168,710 times
Reputation: 148
The truth is small town people do not trust any one not in the little world they are the rude ones , you can move to small town and feel like an outsider I did so I joined the service it was better to leave then feel people that have known each for 100 years look at you like your from another planet.

They have no idea what they do to others , they speak of people by there first names like you should know them because they do and you should your out.

They don't mind their own business and talk about you and your family as most have no lives and assume you don't like mud fest there is something wrong with you.

They pretend to be friendly they are not, they only ask questions to get to pry into your life so they can gossip about you.

I moved to a small town 15,000 and my family had a President visit never a mention or a word to me or my family yet a local car dealer is a big deal ?

your joking right its laughable how self important small town people are , I spent 40 years because of a sick mother in and out of that town.

If anyone is truly rude and has huge egos its small town people who think the world re voles around there tiny circle jerk of dip **** Jeff foxworthy worshiping morons.

You robbing your daughter of seeing the outside world the real world , if she ever leaves she will be seen as an out cast and a rube as she too will mention old bob down at the gas station and people will be amazed how anyone can be so self involved that they would even know who Bob was.

TabulaRasa your right but the truth is your the rude type I speak of , you see life from your small view of the world and everyone else is freak I assure you small towns produce more porn stars then anywhere, seems the freak show are those oh so quite people who reside in those small towns you hold so near and dear .

In small towns they pretend to be more moral and so much nicer well sweet pea let me educate you after 40 years the real freaks don't tell your their freaks they hide behind the veil of quote small town ethics and morals .

My facts based on 40 long years of trying to get along and just be felt alone , I gave up along time ago on the getting in part ..

the real side show is not the big cities they are easy to see who's who and whats what , its the hidden redneck agenda youshould be concerned about there is where the real trouble lies . look at Sanford where trayvon martin was killed I lived there home to the KKK there is a good example of small town morals and ethics.

The Black people there have plenty to say about small towns turn on the news and open your mind.

I had black friends there who told me I was the first white person to ever reach out and make an effort to speak to them , unlike the small town police asking what you doing on my Highway boy .
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Old 03-28-2012, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
2,707 posts, read 5,433,430 times
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I'll bet if you put some effort into it, you could have squeezed at least a half dozen more stereotypes into that post...
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Old 03-29-2012, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan
2,150 posts, read 3,655,779 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itsMeFred View Post
I'll bet if you put some effort into it, you could have squeezed at least a half dozen more stereotypes into that post...
Which one's are missing?!?!?! I'm surprised we weren't all accused of having white hoods, and torches in the closet
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Old 03-29-2012, 07:52 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,083 posts, read 34,587,197 times
Reputation: 16866
Quote:
Originally Posted by topher5150 View Post
Which one's are missing?!?!?! I'm surprised we weren't all accused of having white hoods, and torches in the closet
We were, third one from the bottom.
Quote:
the real side show is not the big cities they are easy to see who's who and whats what , its the hidden redneck agenda youshould be concerned about there is where the real trouble lies . look at Sanford where trayvon martin was killed I lived there home to the KKK there is a good example of small town morals and ethics.
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Old 04-01-2012, 08:47 PM
 
4,249 posts, read 8,253,149 times
Reputation: 5089
The OP resonates with me on so many levels. To be brief, I am trying to balance the cons with pros or find other ways.

1. The kids:

Pros: Growing up in rural area will be with them forever. The big city lifestyle is never too late to explore, but the nature is better from the young age.

Cons: yep, I do worry about them growing narrow-minded. Or narrower-minded than otherwise. The solution: expose them to the larger world, opening their minds. Luckily we have an opportunity to travel to another country for a while. That beats moving to any city.

2. Personal development/interests (dumbing down?).

Yes, it was a culture shock to adjust to a world evolving around small local happenings. Yes, the previous decades of my life bore little significance here. Solution: I keep subscribing to and reading what I like to read. When I am about to lament the absence of anyone to discuss that, I immediately think of the poor souls in cubicles, dumbed down by the big machine that is the city.

3. People

I would probably be disappointed by the average rural Joe, but then the average city Joe is not much better. Luckily here in the rural area I've seen what the natural intelligence looks like, what the natural genius is. This beats the folks with diplomas who I used to know. I am still fascinated by this ability to create/build/know. I consider this one of the most important aspects of making my life here worthwhile.
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Old 04-06-2012, 01:18 PM
 
Location: South Coast of Nebraska
252 posts, read 642,154 times
Reputation: 182
I, also, have a hard time wording this without sounding small town arrogant: "Do what I did."

Live in a small town. Various reasons, for doing so, include mine--family and property trump every other attractive option. Therefore, this is where I work and reside and, often, socialize.

However, I recommend driving to the nearest small city and joining an organization that interests you and challenges your intellect. Go to their meetings, or socials, or whatever, regularly.

You will come home, each month or week, with more to think about, new friends---and, perhaps the consolation that their are smart and dumb and nice and annoying people, everywhere.
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Old 04-06-2012, 05:11 PM
 
1,135 posts, read 1,871,118 times
Reputation: 1571
Well, just spent last evening with the most wonderful octogenarian listening to stories and aspects of life that I find fascinating to no end. This person is a retired surgeon that spent half their life donating their surgical skills to those who were too poor for services and saved many of lives on a worldwide front. (I LOVE listening to those much older for they DO have the best stories.) So, in my listening this person relayed that "so n so" was extremely smart (yah, Harvard doesn't toss out too many idiots) ...but quote of this person, " You just can't let people know THATup here that you are smart." and " You just have to pretend you aren't". I politely said , "oh." I went home to ponder.

Someone twice my age from a different era, geographic location, Ivy League education and worldwide experience??? What else can I say but "oh".
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