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Old 05-15-2012, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Chicago
1,312 posts, read 1,605,164 times
Reputation: 1487

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hippyman View Post
I didnt see anything like this posted, so here goes. I live in a town of roughly 12000 people. One thing that has always bothered me about here, over other small towns, is that we have too many police officers. When I think of small town, I think of a sheriffs dept. and thats it. We have 23 cop cars, last I heard; I think thats a few too many. One sheriffs dept. should be able to handle the job, if you ask me. What are ya'lls opinions on this?
See, the thing is, people hate the government.

That is, they hate the FEDERAL government.

People, from what I can tell, love the LOCAL government.

And this is where the problem lies.

Do people want more government workers? NO! But do they want more police (local government)? YES!

The truth is, the bigger the city you live in, the more the police (government) is going to be out of you hair.

The smaller the city you live in, the more you have to deal with the government (the police).




Take for example, fireworks.

They are banned in Chicago, but come 4th of July there are nothing but booms and bangs until the wee hours of the morning. The police have better things to deal with than fireworks abusers.

In a small town? The police have nothing better to do than seek out the source of those "illegal" fireworks.




And furthermore, being a police officer is a JOB. If someone has a job, they are expected to produce results, right?

So if there is no "crime" (murders, rapes, kidnappings, robberies) the police have to find/make "crime" if they want to continue to have their current job. After all, a worker without something to do is an unemployed worker. And police officers don't want to be unemployed.

Local government is just like federal government, except on a smaller and more local scale.
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Old 05-15-2012, 02:55 PM
 
434 posts, read 449,858 times
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Many of these small town cops wouldn't last a week in a bigger city.
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Old 05-15-2012, 03:05 PM
 
Location: In a happy place
3,784 posts, read 7,045,715 times
Reputation: 7473
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr.drew View Post
Many of these small town cops wouldn't last a week in a bigger city.
That's OK. I'm not a cop and I'm not sure I would last a week in a bigger city either.

What's your point?
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Old 05-15-2012, 04:23 PM
 
Location: On the Ohio River in Western, KY
3,388 posts, read 5,823,574 times
Reputation: 3347
Quote:
Originally Posted by rrtechno View Post
I have noticed that nearly everyone who has a gripe with law officers give the impression that ALL officers are bad, and most of those who have an overall respect for the officers indicate that they have not had issues with the officers THEY HAVE COME IN CONTACT WITH. Perhaps the difference lies in upbringing and attitude?
It's probably a good thing you added the word nearly. I have tons of friends, and a few family members that are LEO; and while I respect the uniform, that doesn't mean I have to give ANY respect to the person wearing it; especially if they are not worthy of anything but a swift kick in the patookie.

Face it, with education being easier, and some areas screaming for more cops; the hiring standards are dropping. There are a couple of cops in this area that would have NEVER been hired 20yrs ago, but they had to have people, so they were hired now.

Some of these guys (and girls) do NOT deserve to wear the uniform, that's a fact. They are rude, mean, spiteful, and abusive and wearing a uniform is a deadly combination.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
So the boredom that plagues small town officers has come to the big cities as well, thru our many self-patroled gated HOA communities. In my community, we levy a $90 fine for a noise violation, someone playing their stereo too loud. No need for the police! A murder, domestic violence case, burglary, yes!
Crazy isn't it? Evansville, IN (right across the river from me) was ranked #1 in the state of Indiana last year for meth production; yet people are still being harassed for jaywalking! Can't these officers do their jobs and prevent and stop REAL crimes like meth manufacturing?! Of course they could, but sitting on your butt in your car ticketing lone jaywalkers is MUCH easier and less of a drain on city resources. (jaywalkers are just a ticket, not jail, courts, etc... while meth makers/users require jail, hospital, court, drug testing etc...)
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Old 05-16-2012, 01:35 PM
 
12,918 posts, read 15,776,377 times
Reputation: 14968
Quote:
Originally Posted by rrtechno View Post

I have noticed that nearly everyone who has a gripe with law officers give the impression that ALL officers are bad, and most of those who have an overall respect for the officers indicate that they have not had issues with the officers THEY HAVE COME IN CONTACT WITH. Perhaps the difference lies in upbringing and attitude?
Could be right....of BOTH parties.
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Old 05-16-2012, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Ohio
20,728 posts, read 14,675,065 times
Reputation: 16981
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr.drew View Post
They are giving DWI's to people who go to the bar at happy hour and have maybe 5 or 6 beers in 2 hours. People the average person wouldn't think was under the influence. And they have to make up reasons to pull people over because they are driving fine.
I used to do that (walk through parking lots chalking tires and kicking out taillights/headlights).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr.drew View Post
How would you feel if you got creamed by a cop car when he was driving a hundred miles an hour while involved in a car chase over a broken headlight? Then how would you feel if you had to pay for your medical bills and new car yourself because that irresponsible cop doesn't have to take any responsibility for hitting you?
I can appreciate that. We had an "homeless" person sleeping in Washington Park, and a cop took a short cut through it while in pursuit. He unknowingly ran over and killed her. Although she had been "homeless" for 6 years, her family suddenly crawled out from under rocks frothing at the mouth demanding money.

Every study ever done shows that there is a very high correlation between education level and police brutality/police corruption.

The lower the level of education, the greater the likelihood of engaging in police brutality or acts of corruption.

There was a lot of corruption on the Cincinnasti police department, because there were many high school drop-outs on the police force. That changed about 12-15 years ago after public outrage. The department now requires an high school diploma or GED (which, um, is real comforting -- not).

The outrage was sparked by the fact that the city hired a man as a police officer who was a known crack addict, who had openly admitted to using crack and being a crack addict.

After his probationary period ended (naturally) he claimed that stress from the job caused him to start using crack cocaine again, and the tax-payers of Cincinnati are paying his worker's compensation claim -- he's not working because of his, um, "disability."

My point is that police are under civilian control, specifically local civilian control to wit: the mayor/council (or city-manager/council) vis-a-vis the voters -- meaning you.

If the police are not performing to your expectations, then it is incumbent upon you to get involved and to elect those persons to the office of mayor/council who will reform the police department at all levels, from the application process, the screening process, background checks, and duty-performance, and set up whatever safeguards are necessary to ensure a fair and impartial review of actions to determine liability when needed.

It doesn't do much good to rail against the system, but then refuse to participate in the system.

If unions happen to be a problem, that is to say, unions are perpetuating the problem by protecting those police who engage in brutality or corruption, then you need to attack the unions, and you can have a union certified for fraud.

Being civic-minded...

Mircea

Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
Interesting post. I'm not American and I have always wondered about how the police were structured/hierarchy of, in the US so you've answered some of my questions.
In many instances it is a total nightmare, in part because of the existence of over-lapping jurisdictions and due to the complete lack of jurisdiction.

Case in point, illegal drugs.

In Hamilton County, there are 23 jurisdictions, If a dealer is operating out of one jurisdiction, but acting in other jurisdictions, my hands are tied.

I have no legal right to enter another jurisdiction for purposes of conducting surveillance or other intelligence gathering operations in order to identify the main players, the supply line, the method and manner of distribution, etc etc etc.

What Hamilton County did was create a joint task force, referred to as DART (Drug Abuse Reduction Task-force) which was granted county-wide jurisdiction, but that is not satisfying.

If there's a meth lab in Clermont County distributing in Hamilton County, and then also in the counties of Boone and Kenton in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, then what?

Well, in theory, that would fall under the jurisdiction of the FBI and DEA, but neither organization is very responsive to the needs of people in the communities, to local governments, county governments or the States.

As you might have already guessed, a lot of things slip through, slip by or fall through the cracks because of such complications.

There are in fact, Federal Police who have jurisdiction on federal property, which includes federal court houses, federal office buildings, and all federal lands (and that often includes military reservations such as army or air force bases).

However, under no circumstances could I ever support any type of federal police operating as "national police" with jurisdiction and authority over the whole of the United States.

State police, with State-wide jurisdiction? Sure. I was very impressed with Germany's system of State police (Germany is a federation like the United States and like Switzerland). In fact, I had met Herr Frankenfeld on several occasions when he was chief of police for the German State of Niedersachsen.

I do believe that law enforcement in the US will evolve, and soon, due to the prolonged economic conditions that will endure for the next several decades.

It is a matter of money and of efficiency, and I fully expect to see a lot of consolidation into "Metro" operations.

Structurally...

Mircea
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Old 05-16-2012, 05:28 PM
 
434 posts, read 449,858 times
Reputation: 153
I remember having to call the police to come to the store where I work because the people who had the cabin next to it ran into the side of the building with their vehicle and put a big dent in it. When the cop got there, I showed him the dent, then I showed him the tire tracks that led directly from the building to the car parked in their yard.

This cop didn't go over to talk to the neighbors to see what happened. He basically told me that he wasn't going to do anything and left. He didn't even fill out a police report. It's not a big deal, but it would be nice for him to have at least talked to the neighbor.
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Old 05-16-2012, 07:27 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
34,460 posts, read 43,326,884 times
Reputation: 44181
Getting back to the meth labs for a minute. Don't think that local law enforcement isn't aware of them and wants to do something. But, the new program for those operations is to let them run, infiltrate it and work your way up the distribution chain. That way an entire operation is shut down instead of just one guy in his basement. That takes time to do and the beat cops are under strict orders not to interfere unless something is on the street blatant.
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Old 05-16-2012, 08:37 PM
 
2,878 posts, read 3,927,056 times
Reputation: 3083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr.drew View Post
I remember having to call the police to come to the store where I work because the people who had the cabin next to it ran into the side of the building with their vehicle and put a big dent in it. When the cop got there, I showed him the dent, then I showed him the tire tracks that led directly from the building to the car parked in their yard.

This cop didn't go over to talk to the neighbors to see what happened. He basically told me that he wasn't going to do anything and left. He didn't even fill out a police report. It's not a big deal, but it would be nice for him to have at least talked to the neighbor.
I think you are full of BS.... . Why would anyone believe your trolling stories?
OD
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Old 05-16-2012, 09:51 PM
 
434 posts, read 449,858 times
Reputation: 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by ognend View Post
I think you are full of BS.... . Why would anyone believe your trolling stories?
OD

Because it's the truth, but believe what you want.

Why wouldn't you believe cops are lazy or crooked?

Why do people on here get mad at me just for writing personal examples of cops being crooked or just not doing their jobs correctly?

It's like you people can't believe they have an agenda other than helping or protecting citizens.
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